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TOWN TOPICS 

M Princeton 's Weekly Community Newspaper Since 1 946 P^^ 








f#5T- 






M 



VOL. LVII, NO. 33 



www.towntopics.com 



50c at newsstands 



Wednesday, OCTOBER 15, 2003 



United Way Launches 
Women's Leadership 
Initiative 5 

Graduate Student 
Surveys Princeton 
Political Discourse ... 7 

School Construction 
Update Offered by 
School Board 13 

Princeton Football 
Thrashed 30-3 by 
Colgate as It Hits 0-4 for 
First Time In Its Proud 
History 43 

PHS Alum Matt Levlne In 
Top Gun Role for 
Undefeated Em o r y 
Soccer 46 




Princeton Historical 
Society's Gail Stem Is 
This Week's Princeton 
Personality 28 

INDEX 

Art 40 

Calendar 27 

Cinema 38 

Classified Ads 56 

Clubs 25 

Consumer Bureau .... 52 

Mailbox 18 

Music/Theater 31 [ 

Obituaries 54 

People 53 

Religion 55 

Sports 43 

Topics of the Town ... 3 

Town Talk 9 

Weddings 16 



Institute Donates 
Einstein's Furniture 
To Historical Society 

The Princeton Historical Society 
announced on Thursday that it had 
received a collection of furniture that 
had once belonged to Albert Einstein. 
The furniture, which was part of a 
donation to the Historical Society 
from the Institute for Advanced 
Study, was used by Einstein to fur- 
nish his house at 1 12 Mercer Street. 

"We're just so very excited to be 
custodians of these pieces,'' said Gail 
Stern, director of the Historical Soci- 
ety, at a Thursday afternoon recep- 
tion celebrating the donation. 

Einstein's personal possessions 
have passed through only a handful 
of channels since his death in 1955. 
His stepdaughter, Margo, was the 
primary curator of his residence and 
belongings up to her death in 1986. 
She subsequently left Einstein's 
property and remaining belongings 
to the Institute, which has watched 
over the furniture ever since. 

Sixty-five pieces of Einstein's fur- 
niture make up the donation, includ- 
ing his favorite tub armchair and his 
family's Biedermeir-style grandfather 
clock. All the pieces will be subjected 
to methods of conservation and res- 
toration; Several pieces, however, 
including Einstein's music stand and 
pipe, are already on display at Bain- 
bridge House, at 158 Nassau Street. 

The music stand represents Ein- 
stein's passion for music and devo- 
tion to the art throughout his tenure at 
the Institute. Maureen Smyth, curator 
of the Historical Society, said that 
items like the music stand offer an 
inside look at the "real man behind 
the icon." 

"Einstein found a beautiful and 
intricate order in music, one that 
inspired and informed his scientific 
theories," Ms. Smyth said. 

The furniture ranges from a Queen 
Anne table made in Austria between 
1730 and 1770, to an upholstered 
"throne" chair with brass finials from 
the early 1900s. Ms. Smyth said that 
every item in the collection will be 
subjected to several intensely 
detailed conservation processes. 
These include looking into the pieces 
for insect damage and overall 
cleaning, as many of the pieces have 
dulled with age. 

"All work that our conservators do 

Continued on Page 21 



Borough Passes Anti-Patriot Act Resolution 



On Tuesday, October 7, Prince- 
ton Borough decided to join 182 
other municipalities in the country 
and stand up against the Patriot 
Act. 

Mayor Marvin Reed was forced to 
break a tie twice during the resolu- 
tion discussion in the public portion 
of the Borough Council meeting. 
First, the council was split in half on 
whether the resolution should be 
voted on during the meeting or 
postponed until the following week. 
Then, there was a tie between 
those for and against adopting the 
resolution opposing the govern- 
ment's Patriot Act. 

The issue was not whether or not 
the council was against the Patriot 
Act, but whether or not this was a 
national issue that should be 
acknowledged in a Borough meet- 
ing. In the end the resolution was 
passed, with a vote of 4-3. 

The Borough was the second 
municipality in the state to pass a 



resolution against the bill that was 
passed by Congress 45 days after 
the September 11 attacks. Willing- 
boro Township also passed a reso- 
lution opposing the bill last month. 
The Patriot Act, created to increase 
safety in the country against further 
terrorist attacks, was passed by 
overwhelming margins In both the 
Senate, 98 to 1 , and the House of 
Representatives, 356 to 66. How- 
ever many criticized the 342-page 
bill after it was passed because of 
how it infringes on citizens' rights. 
The Patriot Act allows the 



government to perlorm a more thor- 
ough investigation of those thought 
to be connected with terrorism. The 
bill says the government has the 
legal right to search private medical 
records, library records and student 
records without a warrant, and with- 
out notilymg the individual being 
investigated. All municipalities are 
required to hand over this informa- 
tion if the government demands it 

The Borough's resolution does 
not state that it is against govern- 
ment activity to combat terronsm. 

Continued on Page 20 



Township Residents Voice Their Concern 
Over Chronic Flooding of Harry's Brook 



Residents of the community 
around Harry's Brook publicly 
expressed thetr concerns regarding 
consistent flood conditions around 
their properties at Monday night's 
Township Committee meeting. The 
issue, which was not on the 



scheduled agenda, has been an 
ongoing problem in the area sur- 
rounding Harry's Brook, especlaUy 
in light ot two recent severe rain- 
storms that the area has sustained. 
The flooding of Harry's Brook is 

Continued on PtQt 22 




THE THEORY OF MUSIC ALU Y: Albert Einstein playing his violin on his 50th birthday in 1929. 
The music standi, which he used at his residence at 1 1 2 Mercer Street, is one of 65 pieces of 
Einstein's belongings donated by the Institute for Advanced Study to the Princeton Historical 
Society. The music stand is currently on display at Bainbridge House at 158 Nassau Street. 



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TOWN TOPICS* 

Princeton's weekly community newspaper since 1946 

DONALD C. STUART. 1946-1981 DAN D. COYLE. 1946-1973 Founding Editors! Publishers 
DONALD C. STUART IU. 1981-2001 Editor/Publisher 



LYNN ADAMS SMI I H 
Publisher 

KEN SMITH 
General Manager 

ROBIN SZCZECH 
SARAH GABLER 

Advertising Managers 

CLAUDIA STOY 
Office Manager 

NANCY DOODY 
Circulation Manager 

MARTHA ROSSMAN 
Real Estate 

POLLY BURLINGHAM 
Clas nfied Manager 



LYNN ADAMS SMITH. Managing Editor 

BILL ALDEN. Sports Editor 

CANDACE BRAUN, Reporter / Writer 

MATTHEW HERSH. Reporter - Writer 

REBECCA BLACKWELL. Photographer 

DONALD GILPIN 

NANCY PLUM 
JEAN STRATTON 
BECKY MELVIN 
KAM WILLIAMS 
Contributing Editors 
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For additional information, please wnte or call 

4 Mercer Strwt, Princeton. NJ 08540 lei: 609-924-1200 fax: 609-924-2460 
www .low ntopics.com 

(ISSN 0191-7056) 
Periodicals Pottage Paid ai Princeton. NJ 
Postmaster. Please send address changes to 4 Mercer Street. Princeton. NJ 08540 




SINGING STUDENTS: The Sherekhan A Cappella Group off Princeton Univer- 
sity entertained crowds on Saturday during Community Day. inm^mntsiMh) 



Borough Agrees to Share 
Land With Township 

Borough Council dead- 
locked once again over a pro- 
posal to add Princeton Town- 
ship to the deed for lands on 
River Road that surround a 
former sewer plant. However, 
Mayor Marvin Reed broke the 
tie, leading to passage of the 
ordinance at the Borough 
Council meeting on Tuesday, 
October 7. 

In August when the ordi- 
nance was first introduced, 
Council deadlocked on 
whether or not the land sha- 
ring ordinance should be con- 
sidered. Mayor Reed broke 
the tie at that time as well, 
allowing the the ordinance to 
be introduced. Last Tuesday 
Council members Joseph 
O'Neill, Wendy Benchley and 
Peggy Karcher voted in favor 
of the land-share, while 
Mildred Trotman, Roger Mar- 
tlndell and David Goldfarb 
voted against It. The land will 
now be shared by the Bo- 
rough and Township. 

The land, which is 171 
acres of partially undeveloped 
woods off of River Road, was 
formerly the Borough's sewer 
plant and garbage dump. The 
title to the land was adminis- 
tered by Princeton Sewer 
Operating Committee, and 
signed In 1932 by the Bo- 
rough. Township and Prince- 



ton University. The agree- 
ment said that all three would 
share in the costs of the 
plant. The sewer plant was 
abandoned after construction 
of the Stony Brook Regional 
Sewerage Authority treatment 
plant. 

The land must be used in a 
manner agreed upon by both 
parties. 



Rotary Club's weekly meeting 
on Tuesday, October 21 at 
12:15 p.m. at the Nassau 
Inn. 

For more information, call 
(609)720-5173. 



Stem Cell Research to Be 
Discussed at Rotary Club 

Dr. Fred Ferrari will 
address the Rotary Club of 
Princeton on the latest 
advances in stem cell 
research and the impact that 
legislation has on the 
research. 

Dr. Feirari, of the Friends 
of Spinal Cord Injury Project 
at Rutgers, will speak at the 



Mini-Rummage Sale 
At Trinity Church 

Trinity Church, located at 
33 Mercer Street, will hold a 
mini-rummage sale on Satur- 
day, October 25 from 9 a.m. 
to 12:30 p.m. The event will 
be held inside the church and 
is not to be confused with 
their March rummage sale. 

Some of the items included 
in the sale are: furniture, pic- 
tures, winter bedding, toys, 
games, sports equipment, 
luggage, pet supplies, tools, 
and building materials. 



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A GENERAL'S LAST STAND: The Thomas Clarke House, at the Princeton 
Battlefield State Park, was the site of General Hugh Mercer's ultimate 
demise after being wounded in the Battle of Princeton in January 1777. The 
Battlefield area also serves as the burial grounds for several British and 
American Revolutionary War soldiers. 

Princeton Haunts Keep the Fables Alive 



As Halloween approaches 
and the leaves begin to 
change into their amber and 
ruddy autumn hues, we can 
surely begin to think about 
the age-old October inquiry: 
what am I going to be for 
Halloween? For many, this 
can be a daunting task requir- 
ing several weeks of thought 
and consideration. However, 
for residents of the Princeton 
area, there are plenty of 
fabled tales of ghosts and 
hauntings to give inspiration 



to even the most severe case 
of "Halloween Block." 

For the next three issues up 
until Halloween, we will 
explore three of Princeton's 
most notable haunts. While 
some may not necessarily be 
"haunted" by paranormal 
beings, the history alone can 
offer enough of a treat to 
even the most sinister trick- 
sters, and offer some valuable 



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TOPICS 

Of the Town 



Fredericksburg, Congress had 
a monument erected in his 
honor with an inscription say- 
ing that General Mercer had 
died "bravely defending the 
liberties of America." 

However, It Is the Thomas 
Clarke House where General 
Mercer passed. The house, 
which now serves as a muse- 
um, is frequented by visitors 
who are still welcome to see 
the blood stains on the floor 
that serve as reminders of one 
of the fiercest battles of the 
American Revolution. 

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insight into Princetons 
and historical past. 

We start with the famed 
Thomas Clarke House at the 
Princeton Battlefield. Two 
men, William and Thomas 
Clarke, built the house 
around 1770 In the heart of 
the sun-oundlng fields and 
orchards. Unfortunately for 
the Clarkes, the house and 
property were soon consumed 
with the conflict between 
American and British forces 
that would later be known a< 
the Battle of Princeton. Th< 
battle was a gory one, whlcl 
resulted In 14 American 
deaths and over 100 British 
casualties. 

The site serves as a burial I 
ground for these departed sol- 
diers. There are no monu-l 
ments that designate thelrl 
graves. 

The most historically nota-| 
ble of these casualties was 
General Hugh Mercer. In the 
January 3, 1777 battle, It 
recorded that General Mer-I 
cer*s horse was wounded byl 
enemy fire leaving him dls-l 
mounted and alone In the 
field. The animal soon suc- 
cumbed to British combat and 
perished. Colonel Hazlet, 
another figure of the revolu- 
tion, died in the battle as well. 
However, it was Mercer 
who survived long enough to 
be found by Major Armstrong, 
the General's aide. He was 
then brought to Thomas 
Clarke's house where he was 
housed for several days. Gen- 
eral Mercer died In the house 
on January 12 in the arms of 
Major George Lewis, a 
nephew of General Washing- 1 
ton. 

In addition to surviving nlnel 
days after he fell to British 
bayonets, a testament to Gen- 
eral Mercer's stamina was his 
ability to help in his own sur- 
gical process. He was trained 
to the point of army surgeon 
while In Europe, and assessed 
the severity and possible dam- 
ages of his wounds to the two 
surgeons who were dls 
patched to assist him. 

General Mercer was ulti- 
mately buried at Laurel Hill In 
Virginia. In nearby 




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BLOCK PARTY FUN: Moriah Akrong, gets her face painted at the Prospect 
Avenue block party on Saturday. (photon, vow smnr,) 



Media Personalities 
To Discuss Cold War 

Media personalities Phil 
Donahue and Vladimir 
Pozner will be featured In a 
program entitled. "Control- 
ling the Message: How the 
Media Framed the War," at 
7:30 p.m. on Thursday, 
November 6, In Dodds Audi- 
torium In Princeton Universi- 
ty's Robertson Hall. 

Mr. Donahue has been a 
major talk-show host In the 
United States for many years; 
Mr. Pozner played a similar 
role on Soviet television In 
the era leading up to the end 
of the Cold War. Starting In 
the mid-1980s, the two did a 
number of joint programs via 
satellite, linking audiences of 
average citizens In Russia and 
the US who were able to ask 
honest questions and talk 
with each other as the Cold 
War was winding down. 

The program is co- 
sponsored by the Inter- 
national Citizen Diplomacy 
Committee of the Princeton- 
based Coalition for Peace 
Action, and Princeton Univer- 
sity's Woodrow Wilson 
School. The discussion will be 
moderated by Jeffrey Laureti, 
senior advisor to the United 
Nations Foundation, and 
former executive director for 
policy studies of the UN Asso- 
ciation of the USA. 

The program will examine 
who controls the media in the 
US and Internationally, par- 
ticularly regarding how issues 
of the war and peace are pre- 



sented. It will also address 
how average citizens can get 
involved In Impacting that 
control. After the presenta- 
tion, Mr. Donahue and Mr. 
Pozner will interact with the 
audience and answer 
questions. 

The event is free and open 
to the public, and those 
attending are asked to arrive 
early. Overflow audience may 
view the program via closed 
circuit television In neighbor- 
ing rooms. For more informa- 
tion call (609) 924-5022 or 
visit www. peace coalition.org. 



War of Worlds Re-Enacted 
At Sarnoff Library 

Saturday, November 1 , at 6 
p.m., the David Sarnoff 
Library will perform a staged 
theatrical presentation of 
Orson Welles' s 65-year-old 
radio broadcast of War of the 
Worlds. 

The original broadcast took 
place on October 30, 1938 
when Orson Welles and his 



Mercury Theater on the air 
gave the nation a Halloween 
scare. 

The re-enactment Is the 
result of a joint effort 
between the Institute for Arts 
and Humanities Education 
and the New Jersey Antique 
Radio Club. 

The actors and sound 
effects will be transmitted 
through 1930s velocity 
microphones to 1930s radi- 
os, provided by members of 
the Radio Club. Historian 
William Hart will set the stage 
for the performance with a 
brief description on the state 
of life and mind In West 
Windsor in 1938, and repre- 
sentatives of the Mars Society 
will be on hand. 

A fund raising dessert 
reception to meet and greet 
the artists will follow the per- 
formance. Seating Is limited 
and advance reservations can 
be made by calling (732) 
422-7438. Ticket prices 
range from $10-$35. 



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Women's Leadership initiative 
Unites Mercer County Women 



A new organization has 
started in Mercer County, led 
solely by women. The Wo- 
men's Leadership Initiative 
(WU) was developed last May 
by board members of the 
United Way. The organization 
is comprised of Mercer 
County women who want to 
use their money and talents 
to help out those less fortu- 
nate in the area. 

According to Lilly Palmleri, 
co-chair for WU, the forming 
of the organization mostly 
came from the passion of the 
women. U A lot of these 
women wanted to get 
involved, but they didn't 
know where the needs were," 
she said. "This is a central 
place for them to come." 

Last Friday, October 10, 
the new organization held a 
"Rise and Shine" breakfast, 
to help interested members 
and non-members get more 
information about their first 
project, "Children-At-Risk." 
Approximately 50 women 
came to the event, and many 
additional who couldn't 
attend sent letters asking how 
they could get involved. 
According to Janice Carson, 
senior vice president of the 
United Way, almost 300 
women in total are now on 
the mailing list for the 
organization. 

"Chlldren-At-Risk" was cho- 
sen as the group's first 
project at its initial meeting in 
May. Approximately 70 
women attended the break- 
fast, showing interest in the 
different areas of involvement 
the new organization offers. 

At the end of the breakfast, 
women had the opportunity 
to choose what they'd like the 
group to focus on first: chil- 
dren in poverty, low-income 
families, seniors In need, or 
children at risk. The latter 
had the most responses. 

Now, after establishing its 
current goal, the group is pre- 
paring for various projects 



throughout the holiday sea- 
son that will help children in 
poverty areas, such as Tren- 
ton. At their most recent 
breakfast, the WLI board 
members asked women to 
sign up for various action 
teams, such as the Conflict 
Resolution Workshop, 
Children-at-Risk, and the Ho- 
liday Project. 



The Children-at-Risk Action 
Team plans activities for the 
organization to take part in 
that will help youth in poor 
living conditions. The group 
will help young teenage girls 
living in poverty conditions, 
some with children, to find a 
way to support themselves, or 
to find a place that they can 
receive the support they 
need. While the team Is just 
beginning to brainstorm, 
short- and long-term projects 
are now in the planning 
stages. 

The Holiday Project en- 
ables women without a lot of 
time to commit to participate 
in one portion of a project at 
Thanksgiving or Christmas . 
Thanksgiving volunteer activi- 
ties include adopting a family, 
or donating time or food for a 
family that can't afford a 
Thanksgiving dinner. The 
project has many different 
areas In which volunteers are 
needed, such as collecting, 
sorting and dropping off the 
food, putting food baskets 
together, and delivering the 
baskets to various agencies. 

At Christmas volunteers will 
also adopt families, only 
instead of collecting food, 
they will collect gifts. 
Different responsibilities will 
include picking up, sorting 
and wrapping toys, and drop- 
ping them off at agencies. 

The biggest project the 
group is working on is the 
Conflict Resolution Work- 
shop. Chaired by Jane Kozin- 
skl, a group of women will 
leam how to conduct a work- 



shop for the Trenton City 
Girls/Studio 2B Club, whose 
members are 11 to 17 years 
old. The first half of the work- 
shop will teach the women 
how to instruct the girls on 
making the right choices, and 
how to deal with different 
conflicts. The second half, 
which will take place in the 
latter part of November, will 
Involve the volunteers teach- 
ing the young girls how to 
become good listeners, how 
to cope with peer pressure, 
how to control anger in con- 
flict situations and how to 
prevent conflict from escala- 
ting. Each of the workshop's 
four parts will run approxi- 
mately two hours. 
"1 can't wait to do this, I'll 

Continued on Next Page 




HELPING CHILDREN AT RISK: Women from Mercer County have joined 
together to form the Women's Leadership Initiative of the United Way. 
Shown are members of the Steering Committee, from left, back row, Fran* 
cis Blanco, Jane Kozinski, Steering Committee co-chair, Zuline Gray 
Wilkinson, Christine Lokhammer, Janice A. Carson, vice president of Deve- 
lopment for United Way of Greater Mercer County; front row , Cindy Chen, 
Carolyn J. Anderson, Lilly Palmieri, Steering Committee co-chair, Joyce L. 
McGlynn, Natasha Acevedo, and Margaret Creede. 



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learn so much," said Ms. 
Palmieri. 

Finding the Funds 

One of the problems the 
United Way is currently 
fighting to overcome is the 
economic strain on the orga- 
nization. According to Janice 
Carson, senior vice president 
of development for the United 
Way, the organization has 
received less money this year 
than it has the past two 
years. Because the United 
Way gives money to several 
agencies, she says it has been 
difficult to meet the basic 
needs in the community. 

"These are difficult eco- 
nomic times," said Ms. Car- 
son. "People just aren't able 
to give as much." 

Over 70 volunteers in the 
community decide together 
where the funds raised will 
go. "We fund all the mental 
health and treatment pro- 
grams for children at risk," 
said Kitty Krider, one of the 
group's members. "The prob- 
lem is, we can't fund preven- 
tative programs." 

Preventative programs are 
programs that prevent poor 
living conditions before they 
start, explained Richard 
O'Grady, an employee of the 
N.J. Association of Children's 
Residential Facilities. "Our 
society as a whole seems to 
be reactive when it comes to 
children," he said at the 
recent WU breakfast. Mr. 
Grady talked about families 
with young teenage mothers 
who need guidance, but often 
end up in poor conditions 
because they don't have it. 

However, the Women's 
Leadership Initiative is work- 
ing on correcting this prob- 
lem. "We have ideas we 
haven't taken off the drawing 
board yet," said Ms. Palmieri. 
"There are so many things 
that can be funded by an 
umbrella organization like the 
United Way." 

For information on how to 
Join the Women's Leadership 
Initiative or the United Way, 
email Janice Carson at 
Janice. carson@u wgmc . org . 

— Candace Braun 



Global Cinema Cafe 
To Hold Free Screening 

The Global Cinema Cafe at 
Princeton University will 
present a free screening of, 
"T-Shirt Travels" on Sunday, 
October 19 at 4 p.m., at the 
Carl A. Fields Center for 
Equality and Cultural Under- 
standing, at the comer of 
Olden and Prospect streets. 

"T-Shirt Travels" is a story 
about remote fishing villages 
In South Africa, where resi- 



dents are desperate to make 
ends meet. Focusing on Zam- 
bia, the film investigates the 
second-hand clothes business 
and shows the growing ine- 
qualities that exist between 
first and third world coun- 
tries. The documentary 
reveals how poverty is tied to 
obstacles imposed by third 
world debt and the harsh eco- 
nomic conditions dictated by 
the World Bank and the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund. 

This award-winning film 
was directed and produced by 
Shantha Bloemen, who 
worked in Zambia for six 
months in 1994 and spent 
1997 working as a press 
officer in Liberia. As a com- 
munications consultant for 
UNICEF. Ms. Bloemen has 
worked on a number of differ- 
ent video projects and been 
actively involved in getting 



media attention to child rights 
and third world poverty. 



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even with a plastic bag. 
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a free, fresh and dry 
replacement paper 
if you 
stop by 
our office at 
4 Mercer 
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Political Discourse in Princeton 
Spurred by Graduate Student 






Initial findings of a recent 
survey of how people feel 
about Princeton as a commu- 
nity and about downtown 
development show that resi- 
dents feel deeply and emo- 
tions run high on the subject. 

The survey also finds that 
reactions of citizens involved 
in the process are of two 
extremes, either highly posi- 
tive or highly frustrated. 

In-depth findings have yet 
to be concluded, but are 
expected to be ready for pub- 
lication following the Novem- 
ber 4 elections, said Christo- 
pher Karpowitz, a graduate 
student in Princeton Universi- 
ty's department of political 
science. 

Mr. Karpowitz is conduc- 
ting the survey and plans to 
use it as part of his Ph.D. 
dissertation on political 
psychology. 

"I am interested in how citi- 
zens experience the political 
process," he said. "I am not 
attempting to influence the 
debate one way or another 
and have worked very hard 
not to appear to be doing 
so." 

"What has surprised me is 
how deeply people (in Prince- 
ton] feel about the issue and 
how it touches people's emo- 
tions so deeply," he said. 

The depth of feeling is 
probably due to several fac- 
tors, Mr. Karpowitz surmised. 
"It probably has to do with 
the fact that Princeton has a 
long history and a long tradi- 
tion of being an interesting 
place, full of interesting ideas; 
and, that people enjoy living 
here," he said. 

Many Borough and Town- 
ship residents received the 
survey In the mail this sum- 
mer, and it has been followed 
up since then with at least 
three or four mailed requests 
for participation. 



Specifically, the sample 
included 500 Borough resi- 
dents, 500 Township resi- 
dents, and an additional 250 
Princeton Future participants, 
250 Concerned Citizens of 
Princeton participants, and 
100 people who had spoken 
recently at Princeton Borough 
Council meetings. 

Of the 1,600 surveys 
mailed, Mr. Karpowitz has 
received back 650. He said 
it's not too late to return sur- 
veys, and, in fact, a web site 
has been added to make it 
more convenient to do so. 

Kansas Native 

Mr. Karpowitz, a Lawrence, 
Kansas, native, studying and 
living here with his wife and 
three children, said he isn't 
ready yet to reveal too much 
about his hypothesis. But he 
explained that three different 
approaches of how people 
perceive the political process 
are currently being debated in 
political science. 

In layman's terms, the three 
approaches include 1) the 
mere act of speaking makes 
citizens feel better and that's 
the most important thing, 2) 
even if the citizen's desired 
outcome isn't realized, the 
responsiveness and empathy 
of elected officials is the most 
important thing, 3) having the 
desired outcome met is the 
most important thing. 

Mr. Karpowitz believes that 
while people care strongly 
about outcome, responsive- 
ness also plays an Important 
role. 

The letter that accompa- 
nied the survey was written in 
English and Spanish, and 
Spanish-speaking respon- 
dents were able to obtain sur- 
veys written in Spanish. 

It explained that the survey 
is being used to help better 
understand what residents of 
Princeton think about the 




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ways important community 
decisions are made. 

Mr. Karpowitz, 34. said his 
advisor first suggested the 
idea of using Princeton as 
part of his research. 

"It was serendipitous that 
my own back yard was a 
place where people were talk- 
ing and talking a lot. And 1 
wanted to find out what peo- 
ple were thinking about the 
process," Mr. Karpowitz said. 

Opening questions of the 
survey, which takes a half 
hour to one hour to com- 
plete, have to do with 
whether people see American 
government working more as 
a pure democracy, where 
ordinary people make deci- 
sions, or as a republic, when 
elected officials make all deci- 
sions. 

It moves quickly to the local 
level asking respondents 
things like whether Princeton 
should preserve its small- 
town atmosphere, whether 
the university wields too 
much power in local politics, 
and whether people who 
attended recent Princeton 
Future meetings found them 
neutral and balanced or 
biased and closed to differing 
opinions. 

If respondents didn't attend 
Princeton Future meetings 
they could skip about a fifth 
of the survey. 

Other "cases" for Mr. Kar- 
powitz" research will Include a 
controversy over library 
books in a Virginia school 
district and whether citizens' 
ideas and input in plans for 
the World Trade Center site 
really contributed to what Is 
going to be built. 

Mr. Karpowitz hasn't yet 
settled on a name for his dis- 
sertation. But currently It's 
going under the title, "Having 
a Say: Public Hearings, Deli- 
beration and American 
Democracy." 

—Becky Melvin 



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lor it is in giving that we receive- 

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P RINCETON 1PARTY 

Challenge the Status Quo! 

Insular, unresponsive, and ineffective government 

• Arrogant and complacent Council that precludes 
good government. 

• Unwillingness to acknowledge opposing views and 
ideas. 

• Inability to solve problems (e.g., participatory 
relationship with tax-exempts, senior housing, 
parking). 

Unfettered Development Agenda 

• Vertical evolution of downtown's landscape. 

• Soulless "urban village" along eastern Nassau 
Street. 

• Advocacy the wholesale replacement of "old" with 
"new". 

• Defiles our "distinctive" neighborhoods with 
unsuitable structures. 

Fiscal Quagmire 



12% 
9% 
6% 
3% 
0% 







/ 













■ (mm 

m ' 







1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 
Property Tax Increases ■ Consumer Prices 



The Princeton Party seeks to: 

• Tackle to our decaying financial condition. 

• Institute a sound and accountable decision-making 
process. 

• Diversify the partisan dialogue on Borough Council 
and the Planning Boards. 

• Reverse the misguided pro-development agenda. 

• Embrace public debate on all issues. 

Vote 

Hegedus and Alexandridis 

for Borough Council 

Meet the candidates every Sunday night from 
5:00 - 7:00 pm at The Annex 




Paid for by Hegedus and Alexandndis for Borough Council 

Robert Finnegan. Treasurer. 46 Murray Place. Pnnceton, NJ 08540 

PrincetonParty@aol.com 




COMMUNITY MINDED SCOUTS: Girl Scouts, from left, Nicole Gabauer, 
Marina Thome, and Rachel Smith were participating in Community Day at 
Princeton Stadium on Saturday. iphowbyvn&iesmtw) 



Kelsey Theatre Announces 
Auditions for Winter Play 

Mercer County Community 
College's Kelsey Theater will 
host open auditions for 
"Twas the Night Before 
Christmas" on Saturday, 
November 1 from 11 a.m. to 
1 p.m. Auditions will be held 
in the Kelsey Theatre at the 
College's West Windsor cam- 
pus at 1200 Old Trenton 
Road. 

Auditioners should prepare 
a short monologue and 
Christmas carol, and should 
supply a resume and head- 
shot. Available roles Include 
Santa Claus, townspeople, 
narrators, and dancers. Audi- 
tioners should be at least 8 
years and older: 

The play will be directed by 
Diane Wargo and will be pre- 
sented by trie Kelsey Players. 
Performances are scheduled 
to take place in Friday, 
December 12 at 7 p.m., Sa- 
turday, December 13 at 11 
a.m., 2 p.m., and 4 p.m., and 
Sunday December 14 at 2 
and 4 p.m. 

An audition appointment is 
suggested. For an appoint- 
ment and more information, 
call (609; 530-0912. 




I 



Licensed Professional Counselor 
Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselor 

Specializing in: 

Addiction Issues • Women's Issues 

Depression • Divorce • Dream Work 

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Call 609-924-1474 



JULIUS H. GROSS 



Hussein Ibish 

Communications Director, 
The American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee 



"From Cakewalk to Quagmire: 

The Bush Doctrine and Its Discontents" 
A lecture open to the public 



Sunday, October 19 at 4 p.m. 

Frist Campus Center, Room 302 



Co-Sponsored h\ 

The Pnnceton Middle East Societv 

Princeton Universm International Center. 

The Program in Near Eastern Studies, and 

The Institute for the Transregional Study of the 

Contemporary Middle East, North Africa, and Central Asia 

For more information: call 248-5006 or email: intlct@princeton.edu 



s 



TOWN TALK 

A forum for Princeton residents to express 
opinions about local and national issues 



Q uestion of the Week; 

What do you think about the recall of 

California Governor Gray Davis and 

the election of Arnold Schwarzenegger? 




"I think it's a sham. It sets a bad precedent. We elect 
people and then if they don't do exactly what we want, 
we say they are out. Give them a chance. Gray Davis 
said one very important thing, and that is if the recall 
had to be done just because of the economy, something 
like 38 governors would have had to be recalled and so 
would the president." — Jan Trabb, Sayre Drive 




;"It the people of California want [Schwarzenegger] in, 
|he should be in. They have the freedom to vote, they 
J their rights, and now he's the Governor. It's all 
fair." — Karlene Bethea, Greenbriar Row 







"Gray Davis was incompetent. Whether Arnold 
Schwarzenegger can do better ... maybe he can. It's a 
strange spin on American politics, the whole recall 
idea. If Schwarzenegger is confident and maybe if he 
has the right advisors, he can come up with a plan that 
is better than what Gray Davis had." 

— Steven Turcus, Mount Lucas Road 





M 




' t& 


SB* 


**^H 



u l think it represents politics as usual these days. It 
seems that politics is a lot of surface glitz lately. Arnold 
Schwarzenegger is probably a very smart guy. But it's 
all superficial. People get moved on these tides based 
on what is being packaged very nicely for them and 
substance gets left behind. It's hard for a regular person 
to understand all the meat that goes behind any issue, so 
it's all sold on taglines." 

— Alissa Bronsteen, Baldwin Lane 



> Town Topics « 

ONLINE 

www. 
towntopics.com 



Borough to Ask County The cost ,s $85 P« r person 
To Fund Road Repairs 3^^. & J£ 

With many roads In the information visit www.sps 
Borough In need of repairs, princeton.org or contact Var- 
Princeton Borough Council Is sity Liquors at (609) 
considering turning over 924-0836. 
some municipal streets to 
Mercer County. Cun-endy, the 
only road owned by the 
County is Dm Road, however ' 
the Borough Is considering 
handing over both Mercer 
and Harrison streets. 

Each year the County sends 
the Borough a letter, asking if 
there are any Borough 
projects that could be 
Included In the County's capi- 
tal budget. However, accord- 
ing to Borough Administrator , 
Robert Bruschl, their requests 
are often overlooked. 

Mercer Street, between 
Nassau Street and Springdale 
Road, has many Ill-repaired 
potholes that need to be 
fixed. However, according to 
some Council members, some 
Borough residents prefer the 
road remain as is so that driv- 
ers are deterred from driving 
fast. 

Some precautions have 
been made to correct the 
speed problem between 
Springdale Road and Lover's 
Lane, where speed humps 
were Installed that require 
drivers to drive below 15 
m.p.h. This portion of the 
road was also resurfaced four 
years ago. Mercer Street may 
be considered a County road 
because It turns into Prince- 
ton Pike in Lawrence Town- 
ship, which Is already 
County-owned. 




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The Borough will also ask 
that Harrison Street, located 
between Nassau Street and 
Hamilton Avenue, to be con- 
sidered u for County road 
status. 

Councilwoman Wendy 
Benchley objected to the 
request because she said she 
felt the Borough would lose 
control of the roads. However 
the mayor was in strong 
agreement with the request. 

"We pay the most taxes (in 
the Countyl and should have 
them take care of our roads," 
the mayor said. 

The matter will continue to 
be discussed by the Borough, 
particularly after the change 
in leadership In the County 
after the November 4 elec- 
tion. Current Mercer County 
Executive Robert Prunettl has 
decllrted to run for re- 
election, which leaves Mercer 
County Freeholder and 
Princeton resident Brian 
Hughes, a Democrat and 
Mercer County Clerk Cathy 
DlCostanzo, a Republican, as 
the two potential future 
County executives. 




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St. Paul School To Hold 
Annual Fall Wine Tasting 

St. Paul School will hold Its 
Second Annual Fall Wine 
Tasting on October 25 at the 
Nassau Club. This year the 
proceeds will benefit the new 
science lab at the school. 

Selections at this year's 
wine tasting have been 
expanded to Include offerings 
from Spain and Portugal, and 
the Pacific Northwest. These 
selections will round out the 
remainder of the evening's 
list of value and high-end 
wines from regions of France, 
Italy and California. Varsity 
Liquors of Princeton will sup- 
ply the wines. Door prizes, 
and a buffet dinner served 
among the traditional ele- 
gance of the Nassau Club will 
also be part of the annual 
event. 




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PARTY FOOD: Kelly Gaydos and Loni Greenberg, greet the community and 
offer them food from the Princeton Charter Club during the Prospect Ave- 
nue block party on Saturday. iPhMobfVuemSmnit) 



Carrier Clinic to Host 
Annual Fashion Event 

The Carrier Clinic, a not- 
for-profit behavioral health- 
care system, will host their 
second Annual Fashion Show 
sponsored by the Carrier 
Foundation Auxiliary. The 
show will take place on Octo- 
ber 25 at noon in McAteers 
Restaurant and Caterers on 
Easton Avenue in Somerset. 

All proceeds from the event 
will be donated to the Bright 
Futures for Kids Program. 
The program serves children 
ages 4 through 12 in families 
affected by substance abuse 
and addiction. The program 
offers education, counseling, 
and support to children at 
high risk. The program Is 
designed to help children 
express feelings, learn coping 
skills, Instill cooperation, 



responsibility, maintain a 
drug-free lifestyle, and resist 
peer pressure. 

The event's fashions are 
coordinated by Barbara O' 
Conner Productions Fashion 
Show Services. The fashions 
are by Marlene and Vere- 
nique Collingswood. Mer- 
chandise can be purchased at 
the end of the show and a 
$50 coupon will be given to 
all participants. Tickets are 
$45. 

For more information, call 
(908) 281-1538. 



Seminar registration and 
reception begin at 5:30 p.m.. 
with the seminar beginning at 
7 p.m. There is no charge for 
the seminar, but registration 
is required. To register, write 
to zannetti@amper.com, or 
request by fax at (732) 287- 
3200. For more Information, 
call (732) 287-1000, ext. 
362. 



1946: Americans start to speak of 
the "Iron Curtain." penicillin is synthe- 
sized, and TOWN TOPICS begins 
publication 



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Issues 

Prenuptial Agreements 

Marital Agreements 

Separation Agreements 

Cohabitation 
Agreements 

Dissolution of 

Domestic Partnerships 

Palimony 

Domestic Violence 

Grandparent Visitation 

Post-Judgment Issues 

Adoption 

Mediation 

Appeals 



Trenton 
t-609.396.2l2l 

Morriitown 
c973.S38.0800 

New York 

c 2113016574 

www.nker.com 



Tax Seminar Offered 
By Area Accounting Firm 

Amper. Politziner & Mattia, 
Certified Public Accontants & 
Consultants will host their 
annual tax seminar and 
reception on Wednesday, 
October 22 at the Princeton 
Hyatt at Carnegie Center. 
The Hyatt event, is one in five 
dates and locations organized 
by the accounting firm, but 
the only one located in the 
Princeton area. 

Topics addressed will 
include the child tax credit, 
AMT exemption amounts,, 
increases in bonus deprecia- 
tion for businesses, and 
increases in the expensing 
deduction for capital invest- 
ments by businesses. 




Where 

enhanced 

supportive services 

are part of the 

every day routine... 

Discover 

the Acorn Glen 

difference! 

Call 609-430-4000 

775 Mt. Lucas Road ^^ 

Princeton, NJ fsf 

08540 ^= 




FREE GIFT* 

Last four days for 
this fantastic promotion... 
ends Saturday October 18. 

the 

PICCADILLY 

Do Your Holiday Shopping Now! 

Patterns retiring as of Dec. 1: 

Anastasia/Ming 

Hope/Red Bandana 

'The limited edition Swing Wallet 

(a $24 value) is yours with a 

purchase of $75 or more 

200 nassau street ... prlnceton, nj ... 609-924-5196 



Try One Of Our Beautiful 

EASY-CARE PLANTS 



PLANT SALE 

• Soil-Free 

• Water Once a Month 

• Leak-Proof 

• Allergy Free 

Friday & Saturday 
Oct. 17-18 & 25-26 



50-70%°" 




• Palms • Exotic Foliage 

• Waterfalls • Cacti 

• Large Trees for Home/Office 
Moving to Gardener/Gardener 10/28 

Creative Hydroponics 

379 Amwell Rd • Hillsborough • (v« mile east of Route 206) 
Friday & Saturday 9-4 
www.sotl-FREE.com 



908-359-7171 



«. 






99th Anniversary Sale 

for members 

20% off 

Almost ever/thing in the store* 



3 

n 



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o 



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O 
o 

-4 

o 

CB 
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3 

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Wed. Oct. 1 5-Sun. Oct. 1 9 

PLUS: 33% off a Huge Assortment of 
INSIGNIA APPAREL for adults and children! 

*Except Textbooks, Pequod, Olive's, Pharmacy, Clinique, 

special orders, computer hardware & software, tobacco, stamps. 

(New York Times Bestsellers are 25% off- 

with members getting an additional 5% off 1 .) 



99 



th 



anniversary 



Sale 



36 University Place • Princeton NJ 08540* 609-921-8500 • www.pustore.com 





Fall into white lotus 



o 

E 

o 

z 

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a. 

(A 
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Q. 
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handmade futons and fine furnishings 

i 20 nnceton 191 hamilton si. new bruns. 

tmA'jnooo www.whitelotus.net 732828.2m 



Shop Here... 
...Live Longer! 

With all the great news 

about seafood and 

produce in your diet, 

you'll add years 

to your life every 

time you come to see us! 

Nassau St. Seafood & Produce Co. 

"Good for Body and Sole" 

(609) 921-0620 • Catering: 924-8406 

256 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 
Mon-Fri 8:30-7:00; Sat 9-6; Sun 9-3. (We deliver, too.) 
15 min. courteHy parking in front of store • FREE parking in our lot. 





Trenton High School 
Seeks Writing Coaches 

The Writers' Room Pro- 
gram at Trenton Central High 
School supports student wri- 
ting through its corps of vo- 
lunteer writing coaches. 
Training programs will take 
place this fall and again In 
the winter to help volunteers 
become writing coaches. An 
appreciation of reading and 
writing is required. 

Writing coaches work with 
students in the classroom and 
in the Writers' Room equip- 
ped with computers. Coaches 
are assigned to particular 
classrooms and work with 
students on essays, reports, 
and journals. They work col- 
laboratively with classroom 
teachers to maximize the 
effectiveness of the effort. 

The program is based on a 
highly successful volunteer- 
driven Writers' Room in the 
Montdair school system. For 
more Information, call Mea 
Kaemmerlen, Writers' Room 
coordinator, at (609) 989- 
2485. 

Junior State of America 
To Host Fall Event 

The Junior State of Amer- 
ica (JSA), the largest student- 
run organization in the coun- 
try, will be hosting a fall 
regional event on Saturday, 
October 25, from 9 a.m. to 4 
p.m. at Princeton University. 
The event will give high 
school students from all over 
New Jersey the opportunity 
to debate and discuss contro- 
versial political issues. 

The regional conference, 
"Talking 'Bout My Genera- 
tion," will focus on Issues fac- 
ing America's youth today. 
Students will be debating 
issues such as condom distri- 
bution in high schools, 
taxation without representa- 
tion for minors, and the 
responsibility of the United 
States to police the world. 
Guest speakers, open discus- 
sions and a crossfire debate 
session will all be part of the 
event. 

For more Information about 
the Junior State, visit 
www.jsa.org. 




TURNING NEW CORNERS: Leslie Straut Ward, 
seated left, president of the Corner House Foun- 
dation, with the newest members of the board of 
directors. From left are Thomas Pinneo, Ms. Ward, 
Leslie Pell Linnehan, and Staley Sednaoui. The 
foundation is preparing for its annual fundraiser 
which supports the foundation's programs for 
adolescents, young adults, and their families. Cor 
ner House has offered substance abuse treatment 
services, mental health counseling, and preven- 
tion education programs for 32 years. For more 
information, call (609) 924-8018. 



w 



Recycling 

MONDAY 

For Borough 

and Township 



You're Invited to a 



Charity Fall Rummage Sale 

To Benefit the Family of Madeline Benoff 

k A Sponsor ( \i by the residents, families 
ami staff of Buckingham Place Assisted Living 

•All proceed* to \xn- Rl Utfc Bnintwick teacher. 

»nh jii idvanced IUf iHtfc ihe expemr* <>t medical treatment 



Friday, October 17 

9am to 4pm 

Saturday, October 18 

9am to 3pm 

.u Buckingham Place Assisted I iving (outside) 
I >> Raymond RJ . in Smith Brunswick 



Family Fun, Refreshments, Pumpkin 

Fainting, and More! Plenty of Parking.... 

Cider & Donuts Served All Day! 

Wc arc Collecting Items 

to Sell at the Rummage 

tunuchuld iirmi, tnull-o irt work. ,;i!t 

item*. htng pHHI^MHto dean X in good 

rrpji' s -»i 10-3 front enu 



Questions? Call 732-329-8888. Thank you! 




BUCKINGHAM 



PLACE 



BOOK 1S5 Ra»mond Rd. m SQQtfc HrumwuV Si 2". ftm l>utch Farmer'* Market, next light nuke a leil ooto Raymond Rd. 
1/4 mile on right it Buckingham. Rt. 1 touth make a right on Rayroood Rd. (after Dart Inn on right* 1 block on left. 



Cafe 
Seating 

enjoy 
a relaxing coffee, 

cappuccino, 

breakfast pastry, 

soup, 

sandwich 

or any selection 

from our store 

in a relaxing 

European atmosphere... 

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Princeton Shopping Center, North Harrison Street 



609.924.7755 

Corporate Accounts Welcome 




School Construction Projects 
Are Going Well, Says Board 



satisfied and looking forward 
to the high school 
construction." 

— Candacc Braun 



PRINCETON RESIDENTS 

read, read TOWN TOPICS 



plete one year after the initial j 
start, two years after for the 
middle school, and three 
years after for the high 

Construction on the three middle school. The basement masonry is complete. The scno °' 

elementary schools and the area has been completed and school's roof construction. Overall, School Board 

middle school Is well under- the boilers have been which the board received mcmD€TS said that they are 

way, said Lewis Goldstein, installed In the boiler room, complaints about from both satisfied with the current 

Princeton Regional School which is 90 percent com- teachers and parents, has P r °9 rcss on the schools. 

Districts assistant superlnten- plcte. Temporary boUers wUl ceased for the time being, but We're going along well, 

dent for human relations, be used until the room Is fin- will continue very soon. ™*V re working hard, said 

public and community affairs, Ished. In addition, the cafete- "1 cannot overemphasize ^Lm ^ ^J!? Char ' 

hii a d^l ay uK> C on XJ ^ "l 1 ^ ^^ Wt t Ch A ** *» r °° fln9 WUI * d ° ne i- ft - i- lLS^LSS 
held as an update on school were the only areas worked in the least Invasive way," 

construction. Mr. Goldstein on over the summer, are 90 said Mr. Goldstein. He said 
also announced that a percent complete. that an understanding has 

groundbreaking ceremony for F - M4 ,. n n| , . nn|f been reached between the 
the high school construction Elementary School* ^^ ^ ^ constructk)n 
is due to take place around At Johnson Park, office compan and roofm ^ 
the third week In November, space and boiler renovations start work around 6 am 

The high schools new foot- shou,d *>« completed by the each day tQ avo , d botnerl 
ball field was enjoyed for the w , cek ° f October 20. Shortly students 
first time on Saturday, when aftcr > Acuity will be allowed 

Princeton High School played ^Z^^e^^m school Zd d£u* a fme 
West Windsor Plainsboro ^J^* '^* h ~J schedule." said Mr. DelMar. 
North at homecoming, where s 85 percent complete, and 

they lost 16 to 3. However *" sumrner renovations of lwor Ljnar ' 

the stadium was full, said Mr. *" classrooms were finished wiM sto P l workln 9l- 

Goldstein. on time - Roo » n 9 on the 

school, which started at the At Riverside, several areas 

end of the summer, will be have been demolished and 

"It was great weather, there completed within the next reconfigured, including the 
was a lot of enthusiasm," he month on the existing school nurse's area, faculty toilets, 
said. "It was one of the big- and new additions. student toilets, and plumbing 

gest o-owds In Princeton his- When construction on the and electrical wiring. A new 
tory." The next game set to high school begins, the field staff lounge and parking lot 
be played on the field is a at Johnson Park will be have also been completed, 
girls' soccer game on paved over for high school Roofing and exterior masonry 
Thursday. faculty parking. The area will work will begin soon at the 

Overall, the Board said be returned to a field after school. ^ 
construction has been pro- construction is over. In addition, changes to the 

gressing well at the four Health and Safety Plan for 

schools. However, one large At Commun ^ p ark> me the district are now being 

setback due to weather has ^^ , s |eted and looking Into by a six-person 

taken place at John Wl th er- atlonaI at ^ timc . j^ j^,. committee. 

spoon Middle School, where prob , em wh|ch ocamed Th e $81.3 million project 

groundwater reached approx- a| ^ ^^ at ^ b Innln m mc district has been under- 

imately dght feet In ti!e base- oftheschoo , ycarhas becn way slnce the spr , n g. 

ment. This required design correcte6 A sewet inspecting Recently the School Board 

and Installation of an engi- an(J c |e anlng company awarded a construction bid to 

neered bracing system to pro- ^p^^ me i^ with a fiber Ernest Bock and Sons, Inc., 

tect the existing building, Qptic xo and deaned , t f or the amount of $32.8 mll- 

whlch held up construction ^ a hlgh prcssure jet . lion for the high school con- 
on the school by approxl- Jhere has bem nQ n q{ sbructlon project. This was 

mately six weeks. problems since the Inspec- almost $3 million over bud- 

"Because of the weather, a Q on i^ addition, asbestos get, and funds set aside for 

lot of changes needed to be problems have also been furniture and fixtures In the 

made," said Dan DelMar, a cleared up. other four schools will be 

representative who spoke on used to offset the difference. 

behalf of Epic Construction, Ljttlebrook s staff lounge Constructlon on mc c lemen- 

lnc, the school's construction and parlung lot expansion 

company. were both „ com P \ ei ** thls . 

\m r u_* i xa ™«««, summer. All new toilets and 
Mr Goldstein said money ^ ^ ^ ^^ , n 

was taken out of the school s xJst| cIassrooms> and 
contingency fund to correct ^^ (Ues naye bcen 
the problem. replaced with new vinyl corn- 

Gym and pool construction position tile. Currently, 90 
Is currently underway at the percent of the exterior 




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tary schools Is due to be com- 




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Princeton area! 

• 7,000 sq. ft. 

• furniture 

• accessories 

• oriental rugs 

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•8 miles from 
Princeton; 
52 Railroad Place, 
Hopewell, NJ 

609-466-4400 



TIIE DECORATOR'S 
CONSIGNMENT GALLERY 




330 COLD SOIL ROAD 
PRINCETON, NJ 08540 



www.terhuneorchards.com 



FALL HARVEST FESTIVAL ON THE FARM 




No Admission Charge 
►Country Music 

►Barn Full of Legends and Lore 
►Pumpkin Picking & Painting 
►Farm Wagon Rides 
►Pony Rides 
►Corn Stalk Maze 
►Country Food • Pies • Cider 
►Country Store 
►Parking at the Farm 
Pick-Your-Own Apples, 
Van Kirk Farm Every Day 9-5 



FALL MUSIC ON THE FARM 
Between noon and 4 p.m. 



Saturday, 10/18: Eco Del Sur 

Sunday10/19: Eastwind 

Saturday, 10/25 Thomas Church Ensemble 
Sunday, 10/26 Mountain Laurel 



Molly Pitcher This Weekend! 



Mon-Fn 9 am-7 pm * Sat & Sun 9 am-6 pm 



g 



00 






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Kill deaiung with » differeoa 

"Change the quality 
of your life." 

Renate Yunque 
(609) 683-5889 



RIGGSTOW 

Jarnhjiarkct 



908-359-5218 




Your 

Halloween 

Pumpkin 

Now 



Fresh Poultry 

USDA Processed 

• Chickens • Poussins • Pheasants 

•Turkeys •Ducks •Quail 

• Rotisserie Chicken 

Fresh Produce 

•Vegetables •Fruit 

Pies 

Baked Fresh Daily 
•Fruit •Chicken* Turkey 

Specialty Items 
GRIGGSTOWN FARM MARKET 

986 CANAL RD. PRINCETON, NJ 08540 

Market: 908-359-5218 • Located at Bunker Hill/Canal Rd 

Monday-Friday, 10 to 6 • Saturday & Sunday 12 to 5 




PUMPKIN PAINTING: Getting into the Halloween spirit at Terhune Orchards 
are from left, Renee Perelmann, Jason Perelmann, Mrs. Landow holding her 
daughter Carly, and watching her son Chad Landow. tpmnvvumesmnh) 



M Ml I 



Princeton Senior Center 
To Offer Financial Advice 

The Princeton Senior 
Resource Center (PSRC) will 
host Plans for the Future Day 
2003 on Saturday, October 
25 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at 
its Suzanne Patterson Cen- 
ter. The seminar will address 
questions and problems that 
face individuals as they age. 

The event is jointly spon- 
sored by PSRC, N.P. Morith, 
Inc., the MeTcer County Bar 
Association, the American 
Society on Aging, and the 
National Council on the 
Aging. The day will begin 
with a continental breakfast, 
followed by keynote speaker, 
PriclUa Thayier Brandon, edi- 
tor of Kiplinger's Retirement 
Report. 

Seminar registration in- 
cludes a choice of three out 
of ten workshops, one work- 
shop in the morning, and two 
in the afternoon. Workshops 
include; Protecting and Plan- 
ning Retirement Income; The 
Basics of Medicare and Social 
Security; Financing Long 



W N 



Term Care; Understanding 
Senior Living and Care Con- 
tracts; The Basics of Wills, 
Trusts, and Probate; Legal 
and Advocacy Issues Related 
to Long Term Care Facilities; 
The Basics of Estate Planning 
Issues; Finding Your Retire- 
ment Paradise; Useful Retire- 
ment Planning Tips; and 
Medicaid Issues— A Sensible 
Planning Approach. Each ses- 
sion will be led by a profes- 
sional in the respective field. 

During the lunch hour, 
partners In arranging the 
event will set up displays and 
will answer questions. Sche- 
dule partners are Acorn Glen 
Assisted Living, Bear Creek 
Assisted Living, Buckingham 
Race Assisted Living and Day 



Care Center, Butrym, Cas- 
savell & Hammett, P.C., 
Family Homecare Services, 
Halberstadt Financial Con- 
sultants, Inc., Edward Jones 
Investments, Mason, Griffin & 
Pierson, P.C., Mass Mutual 
Life Insurance Co., PNC 
Bank, The Pavilions at Forr- 
estal, The Residence, and 
Presbyterian Homes & Servi- 
ces, Inc. 

Space will be limited to 
200 registrants. Registration 
is $35 in advance or $40 at 
the door. Registration will be 
accepted In person, by mail 
or phone with a valid credit 
card. For more information, 
visit www.princetonol.com/ 
groups/senior or call (609) 
924-7108. 



Sandra Grundfest, Ed.D. 

Licensed Psychologist — Career Counselor 

609-921-8401 



farmland 
"Pre$e«?vaticm ^?LctS 



Government dollars aren't the only ones that 
preserve open space. The way we choose 
to spend our food dollars goes a long way 
toward determining the quality of our 
landscape and the future viability of New 
Jersey's small farms. Y One of the best 
ways to help preserve farmland in the 
Garden State is to buy your food from local, 
organic farms. You'll 
help to protect the py «— ^ 

environment, support EL*R« 




the local economy, and keep small-scale 
farming viable in the nation's most densely 
populated state. In return you'll get fresh, 
delicious produce that has traveled a few 
short minutes — not a few thousand miles. 

i The Whole Earth Center has a long history 
of offering our customers the products of 

New Jersey's finest organic farms. We invite 
you to stop in today and 

£m savor the best of the 

to^C^ll Organic Garden State. 



ORGANIC PRODUCE • JAMESBURG. NJ 



*" CONSTRUCTION 

Home Improvements 

924-6777 

Remodeling • Renovations • Small Jobs 

Additions • Woodworking • Decks 

Flooring • Design • Ceramic Tile 

FREE ESTIMATES • RT. 206, PRINCETON 



This week, Farmer Ed Lidzbarski 
is our featured local producer 

FROM OCTOBER 1STN TO 21ST, CRT 15% OFF ED'S EGGPLANT, RRD CHARD A LEEKS* • 



hole Earth Center 



NATURAL FOODS GROCERY • SINCI 1*70 



360 NASSAU STREET (NEAR CORNER OF HARRISON STREET) • PRINCETON • 924-7429 
MON0AY-WE0NES0AY 9-7 • THURSDAY-f RIOAY 9-9 • SATURDAY 9-7 • SUNDAY 10-5 

'QUANTITIES AND SELECTION MAY VARY DEPENDING ON THE WEATHER 






The Ven. Carol Stoy 

Archdeacon, Diocese ofNJ 

Apple Pudding 

1 egg 

V* c. sugar 

Vj c. flour 

1 tsp. vanilla 

Va tsp salt 

1 ! : tsp baking powder 

s h c. chopped walnuts 

1 large apple, cored and finely chopped 

Vi tsp cinnamon 

Beat sugar and egg together and add remaining 

ingredients. 

Bake in 9" cake pan in 350 oven for 30 mm 

Serve with whipped cream or vanilla ice cream. 

More to Come ... Watch this space weekly for Princeton's 
favorite recipes... Provided by Claudia Sloy. Town Topics 

Sponsored by 




♦ 



MCCAFFREY'S 

Princeton • West Windsor • Yardley 



F^LL DECORATING TIME 

Mums • Kale 

Pumpkins, Plain & Painted 

Gourds • Indian Corn, 

2& « Scarecrows • Corn Stalks 

- And Decorator's Wreaths 

Perna's Plant & Flower Sho p 

189 Washington Rd. (Vz Mile East of Rt. 1) • 452-1383 




2 GREAT SEWING EVENTS! 



I 



Come at 10:00, stay for lunch and finish at 
4:00! Bring a friend and Experience a day, 
filled with innovative tips and techniques! 

j Sewing Adventure 2003 

I Husqvarna Viking Sewing Star Julie Mallory 
is coming to Stony Brook Sew & Vac -^ 
' for a day of fun, and Sewing Adventure! 

I Garment construction the easy* wayM^fceanij 
new twists in quilting! * GiVe^youfTTome a 
fresh sophisticated, or cozy^ook with clever 

■ home decorating ideas! * Exciting but prac- 

Itical craft projects that will delight all! 
Sat Oct 25th $1 5 includes lunch 

- Home Dec Adventure 2003 

I Husqvarna Viking Sewing Star 
Judith McHenry is coming 
. to Stony Brook Sew & Vac for 

I a day of fun, and Home Adventure! 
All types of Home Decorating ideas to re- 
decorate your home quickly and easily From 

■ pillows to window treatments, and kitchen or 

I dining room to bedroom and bathroom. See 
the latest books, notions, and gadgets to make 
your redecorating more fun than ever! 



Thurs Nov 6th $15 Includes lunch 




TONYJ3ROOK 



THtSfWe VBC SUPER STORf 



onmniMiNiA'iiiteipi mmm 



Kahneman to Present 
Einstein Memorial Lecture 

The Princeton Regional 
Chamber of Commerce will 
host the Albert Einstein 
Memorial Lecture on Thurs- 
day, October 30, at Dodds 
Auditorium, Robertson Hall 
at 5 p.m. 

Professor Daniel Kahne- 
man, Eugene Hlggins Profes- 
sor of Psychology and Profes- 
sor of Public Affairs at 
Princeton University will 
speak about "Toward A Sci- 
ence of Well-Being" . 

In addition to being hon- 
ored with 2002 Nobel Laure- 
ate In Economics, Professor 
Kahneman has received many 
other prestigious awards 
including the Distinguished 
Scientific Contribution Award 
of the American Psychologi- 
cal Society in 1982, the Hll- 
gard Award for Lifetime Con- 
tribution to General 
Psychology In 1995, and the 
Career Achievement Award 
from the Society for Medical 
Decision Making in 2002. 

The event is free but seat- 
ing is limited and reservations 
are required by calling the 
Princeton Chamber of Com- 
merce at 520-1776. 



r~- , 

All open house activities 
will take place at the Waldorf 
School's main campus, 1063 
Cherry Hill Road. Reglstra 
tion is requested, and those 
Interested may call (6091 
466-1970. ext. 15. emal' 
wspadmlsslons@aol.com. oi 
visit www.princetonwal- 
dorf.org. 



Copies of TOWN TOPICS 

dating back to 1946 

are now available on microfilm 

at the 

Princeton Public Library. 



Waldorf School To Hold 
Open House Activities 

The Waldorf School will 
host several open house 
activities this fall. On Tues- 
day, October 28, an Early 
Childhood Information Eve : 
nlng will take place at 7 p.m. 
On Wednesday, November 
12, a Grade School Observa- 
tion Morning will be held. 

On Saturday, November 15 
at 10 a.m., a "hands-on" 
open house for parents and 
their young children will be 
offered by the Early Child- 
hood faculty. Programs for 
the children Include parent/ 
child classes, nursery school, 
and kindergarten. In addition 
to the main campus, satellite 
locations for these programs 
will take place in Princeton 
and Hopewell boroughs. 

The school will also host a 
Grade School Open House on 
November 15 at 11:30 a.m. 
This activity will be held for 
adults. 



the 

cloak&Dagger 

"a mystery bookshop" 




Paperbacks, 

Tradebacks 

Children's & Young 

Adult Mysteries, 

Audtos, Videos, 

Games, Puzzles 

and More! 

349 Nassau St 
Princeton, NJ 
. 609-688-9840 

Tues-Sat 

10am to 6pm 

www thecloakanddagger com 



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Family Owned for Three Generations 

Over 70 Brand Names In Our Showroom 



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999-997-1444 
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Aim for us. ..for all 
things special. 

At the Winged Pig wi an as 

|)[oiul "i "in in' 1 1« Mmi. . . iM. I 

i i i-.i I i Si rvicc as wc an "' 0U1 

great merchandise. The Winged 

eatures home accessor 
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mix oi styles from classic to 
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Not your typical name... 
Not your typical srorC. 

609.924.1212 

The Princeton Shopping Center 

301 N. Harrison Street, Princeton 
www.thcwingcdpigonline.com 









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FORMAL & CASUAL < ATERING 

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The security of farm fresh products daily 
and seasonally- 
Large and small groups treated with the 
same concern 

His "soul event" of the day. your food experience 
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• mi down dim 

• buffets 

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Reservations 609430-8543 

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Trees & Shrubs • Packaged Firewood 
Grass Seed & Fertilizer • Bird Seed 
■ Peer, Animal & Slug Controls 




FRIENDLY S. EXPERT SERVICE 
Hours: Mon-Fni 8-5; Sat &-A; Sun 11-3 



OBAL'S 




Introducing Assisted Living and Skilled Nursing 
at Stonebridge at Montgomery 

• Stonebridge ai Montgomery offer! independent living 
apartments and cottages and is now accepting reservations 
i«m assisted living, memory i are, and skilled nursing, 

• ah assisted living residents enjoy complete access to 

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African Theologian to 
Lecture at Seminary 

Dr. Kwame Bediako will 
deliver the annual Stone Lec- 
tures at Princeton Theological 
Seminary to take place Octo- 
ber 20 through October 23. 

Dr. Bediako. a native of 
Ghana, is the exectutive 
director of the Akrofi- 
Christaller Memorial Centre 
for Mission Research and 
Applied Theology in Ghana. 
He is also the director of the 
Oxford Centre for Mission 
Studies in Oxford. England. 

The theme of the lecture- 
ship is "Christian History and 
the Kingdom of God: Res- 
cuing Our Memories and Dis- 
cerning Some Temptations of 
Our Time." Dr. Bediako will 
address the argument that 
westernization is not a factor 
in Christianity. He will also 
lecture on Christianity's rela- 
tionship with Islam on the 
African continent. 

Dr. Bediako's lectures 
include "A New Christian 
World." Monday. October 20 
at 7 p.m.; "'Animists' as 
Christians," Tuesday. Octo- 
ber 21 at 1:15 p.m.; "Chris- 
tianity, Islam, and the King- 
dom of God," Tuesday, Octo- 
ber 21 at 7 p.m.; "Africa and 
the Christian Identity," 
Wednesday, October 22 at 7 
p.m.; and "What Kind of 
People Should We Be?" 
Thursday, October 23 at 
1:15 p.m. 

For more information, call 
(609) 497-7760. 




Copies of 

TOWN TOPICS 

dating back 

to 1946 

are now available 

on microfilm at the 

Princeton 

Public Library. 



liana Witten and Jake Brenner 

Witten-BrenneT liana Witten, daughter of Edward Wit- 
ten and Chiara Nappi of Princeton, has married Jake Bren- 
ner, son of Libby and Paul Brenner of Burke, Va. Ms. Witten 
is a graduate of Princeton High School and Princeton Uni- 
versity. She is currently a graduate student In the Ph.D. 
program In Neuroscience at Stanford University. 

Mr. Brenner is a graduate of Thomas Jefferson High 
School in Virginia and of Princeton University. He is cur- 
rently an M.D.-Ph.D. student at Stanford University. Mr. 
Brenner and Ms. Witten met as underclassmen at Princeton 
University. 

The wedding took place on August 31, 2003, beside the 
pond at the Institute for Advanced Study. A great blue heron 
was in attendance. Rabbi Edward Feld officiated. 



b*b 

CCLCE STUDIO 

Wearable Hair Color 
49 State Road, Princeton • 609-683-4455 



Hours: MtmdayFriday MOa* J 00 fm • Whfcs s jfc aarfadsn fts«sn fry ■Ifrnifii 




The Hunter Douglas Country Woods* collection is the 
perfect choice for homeowners who appreciate the solid look and warmth of 
real hardwoods, and want the practical advantages offered by horizontal blinds. 
Superior quality, selection, and attention to detail... 

every detail, have made Country Woods the best HimtPf DflllfllftS 

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selling wood blinds in America' 



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eriorS 

Finf FviNirirar • brrtftioi Design &. Decoeating 
Where Princeton Gets Its Good Looks. 
162 Nassau Street, Princeton 924-2561 



Special pricing 

on window shades 

and shutters. 



Ricchard's 

Shoes for the discriminating 
men and women 

148 Nassau St • Princeton • 924-6785 
Mon-Fri 9:30-6; Thurs 9:30-8; Sat 9-5 




Deborah Leamann 
INTERIORS 

ANNUAL UPSCALE 

TAG SALE 



Lamps 

Mirrors 
Prints 

Window 
Treatments 

Bedding 
Accessories 




Furniture 

Pillows 

Fabrics by 

The Yard 

Shades 

Showhouse 

Items 



SPRUCE UP FOR THE HOLIDAYS! 

OCTOBER 

Friday 24th 12pm 'til 5pm 
Saturday 25th 10am 'til 3pm 

~ BRING YOUR MEASUREMENTS ~ 
7 CASH and CARRY ~ 

Win a complimentary design consultation! 

250 South Main Street, Pennington, NJ 08534 

609.737.3330 

www.deborahleamanninterior.com 



SENIOR CITIZENS CALENDAR 

Wednesday, October 15- Wednesday, October 22 

Information Provided by Senior Resource Center, 924-7108 

SENIOR RESOURCE CENTER at Spruce Circle (SC) and 

SUZANNE PATTERSON CENTER (SPC). on Monument Drive. 

Need Guidance? Information about resources 
tor the older adult. Call 924-7108 

Wednesday, October 15: 

9:30 a.m. Aerobics; SPC. 

10:00 a.m. Islam IV, Clay Street Learning Center. 

10:00 a.m. Makers of Science; Borough Hall Conference Rm. 

10:00 a.m. Studio Time. SPC. 

10.30 a.m. Lefs Talk; RC 

1 1 :00 am Lefs Talk in English, SC 

100 pm. BloodPressure.SC 

1:00 p.m. Our Town; SPC. 

3:00 pm. Let's Talk Too; SC. 

Thursday, October 16: 

9:30 a.m. Yoga; SPC 

10:00 a.m Urban Planning for Suburban Seniors; 

Borough Hall. 
10.00 a.m. Three Irishmen off the Page; PCV. 

I 00 p m. FLU SHOTS (A-L); SPC 
1:00 p.m. Art. SPC. 

2:00 p.m. "Faces & Figures in Western Art" - Pr. U. Museum 

Friday, October 17: 

9.30 a.m. Aerobics; SPC. 

1045am. Ping-Pong; SPC. 

Monday, October 20: 

9:30 a.m. Aerobics; SPC. 

10:00 a.m. Islam in the 20th Century. Clay Street Learning C. 

II 15 a.m. Chair Exercise; SPC 

1 .00 p.m. Coping with Bereavement, SPC. 

1.00 p.m. Strength Training; SPC. 

1 30 p.m. Introductory Spanish, SPC. 

1 :30 p.m. The Wonder of Wordplay w/Rice Lyons, SPC 

2.00 p.m. Founding Fathers of Jazz. Call for location 

2:30 p.m Intermediate Spanish; SPC 

Tuesday, October 21: 

9 00 a.m. Blood Pressure; RC 

10:00 a.m Tai Chi; SPC. 

10.00 a.m. Contemporary Dilemmas; SPC 

11:00 a.m. Art, SPC. 

12 30pm Social Bridge; SPC 

V00 p.m. Art/Painting; SPC 

1:00 p.m Lighten Up Princeton; SPC. 

1 :00 p.m. From the Civil War to the Present Day; SC. 

I 00 p.m James Joyce — Short Fiction. SPC 
1.00 p.m. Playing Music, SPC 
Wednesday, October 22: 

9 30 a.m. Aerobics, SPC 

10:00 a.m. Islam IV; Clay Street Learning Center. 

1000 a.m. Makers of Science; Borough Hall Conference Rm 

10:00 a.m. Studio Time. SPC 

10 30am Lets Talk, RC 

I I 00 a.m. Let's Talk in English; SC 
1 -00 p.m. Our Town. SPC 

3:00 p.m. Let s Talk Too; SC 



Drumthuacket Foundation 
Acquires Mahogany Desk 

The Drumthuacket Founda- 
tion announced that the 
mahogany secretary desk 
owned by Charles Smith Old- 
en, who build Drumthuacket. 
has just been restored to the 
house. 

With its original glass doors 
and restored writing surface, 
the circa 1855 desk came 
back to Drumthwacket via 
Jean Bruyere Kell of North 
Carolina, a direct descendent 
of Mr. Oldens sister, Ruth. 
Mr. Olden was governor of 
New Jersey during the Civil 
War, becoming the first gov- 
ernor to live at Drum- 
thwacket. It Is possible that 
he corresponded with Abra- 
ham Lincoln at this desk. 

Drumthwacket is open for 
guided public tours on 
Wednesdays. Reservations 
are required and on site park- 
ing is available. For more 
information, call (609) 683- 
0591 or visit www. drum 
thwacket.org. 




A FAMILY HEIRLOOM RETURNS: Many Olden family member arrived at 
Drumthwacket, the home of New Jersey's governor, to celebrate the return 
of a mahogany desk owned by the first governor to live in the house. 
Shown center, front, is Jean Bruyere Kell, the desk's most recent owner. 



Spooky Saturday 
On October 25 

The Arts Council of Prince- 
ton is hosting its third annual 
Spooky Saturday as part of 
its Family Fun Series on 
October 25 at 2:30 p.m. 
Children and adults will take 
a trip through time, back to 
ancient Egypt to leam how 
mummies were made. Partici- 
pants will also discover where 
mummies live by touring a 
replica of an ancient Egyptian 
tomb, complete with replica 
artifacts and sarcophagus. 

Children will receive a 
workbook filled with interest- 
ing mummy facts and activi- 
ties. They also will be invited 
to the art tables where they 
can construct a mummy head 
sculpture using clay, paint, 
gauze, and popcorn. 

Space is limited and pre- 
registration Is required by 
calling 924-8777 or visiting 
www.artscouncilofprinceton.- 
org. The Arts Council is 
located at 102 Witherspoon 
Street and admission of $7 Is 
payable at the door. 




The Lewis School of Princeton 

53 Bayard I ane, Princeton, NJ 08540 (609)924-81 20 
www lewisschool org 

OPEN HOUSE 

Sunday, November 2nd, 1 -3 pm 



Currently Accepting 

Applications for 

January '04 and Fall '04 



\ .i nationally recognized educational n lourci Hit Lewis ichool has 
successfully educated bright students with lani d li arning difference* o 

loi three decades Since 1973 rhi Lewis School has provided integj 
curriculum-wide, multisensor) education based on the philosophy that learning dif- 
ferent students who need to repair academic weaknesses also demonstrate remarkable 
intellei tUftl .m<l IDtifudi S 



For information regarding Admissions, 
Please contact David Young (609)924-8120 

TJie Lrwls School Jou not Jllcriniincji ihubamo national origin w disability 01 

mis (Vic/ a livilii 




At most animal shelters, 
this kitten wouldn't see the light of day. 





Ten things you need 
to know about SAVE. 

Safe Haven 

Nurture 

Second Chances 

Population Control 

Rehabilitate 

Outreach 

Educate 



Wouidn 't it be great 

//SAVE could do more? 



98 percent of all motherless newborn kittens 
are euthanized, 
at US shelters, because they are simply not staffed lo care for ihem 
At SAVE, when we say we're a no-kill shelter, we mean no kill, no 
mailer how much work is involved. Kiltens as young as this one need 
bottlefeeding every two hours oround me clock, a duty unflinchingly 
carried oul by SAVE's stoff and volunteers. This kitten thrived and sur- 
vived at SAVE Today, she spends her days getting inlo kittenly mis- 
chief at the new home SAVE found for her. 



Find Homes 
Success 

Tradition 

SAVE 

Princeton 'S Animal Shelter 

established 1941 

OCX) Henontc/wn R | n NJ 08540 

CO9-92I-0I22 www saveonimalj org 



m 



MAILBOX 



i 



A Heartfelt Word of Thanks Expressed by 
The Crisis Ministry of Princeton and Trenton 

To the Editor: 

The Crisis Ministry of Princeton and Trenton want to 
express a heartfelt thanks to the Jewish Communities of 
Princeton and Trenton. We received an amazing abundance 
of food from The Jewish Center of Princeton, thanks to 
Rabbi Elklns and the Social Concerns Committee. Food was 
also collected by Princeton University Center for Jewish Life 
and Har Sinai Temple In Trenton. 

The Yom Klppur Holiday comes to us during a time when 
we Axe seeing an Increase In families served on a monthly 
basis (1,100 households per month), which Is a 30 percent 
increase from last year. We are so thankful for the generos- 
ity of tho BOguei who fast and experience hunger, 
while they are collecting food for their vulnerable nelghl 
in need! Thank You! 

SALLY OSMER 

Director 

MARCIA K. MACK1LLOP 

Assistant Director 





Upcoming Author Events at the U-Store 


10/M 


700 pm 1 tflfd Champlln, Nero 


10/16 


7 00 pm inSfd Cole, The Anthrax letter* 


10/18 


1 00 S 00 pm NJ Poetry Society. "Poetry t\ SocUl 




Contclouinesi" Seminar led by Salvatore A. Buttacl 


10/20 


7 00 pm Paul Leggett. Terence Fisher: Horror, 




Myth and Religion 


10/22 


7:00 pm John Wllmerding. Signs of the 


Artltt 








U Store I 


16 Univcruty Place • 92I-8S00 • wwwpimore com 



Resident Appreciates Clarification 
Of the Leaf Collection Schedule 

To the Editor: 

It Is good that Town Topics has published information 
about municipal leaf collection in Princeton (Autumn's 
Chore Made Easier With Leaf Collection Primer, Town Top- 
ics. October 8). Perhaps now we can get the township to 
correct its confusing advice. For years ' have been advising 
township officials that its definition of area one did not 
make sense, but haven't found anyone to take the trouble to 
correct it. It reads In part, that area one "is bordered by 
Route 27 to the north. It includes the Little Brook neighbor- 
hood." Since the Little Brook neighborhood, as well as 
others believed to be included in area one, are north of 
Route 27. something is wrong. Perhaps next year they will 
get it right. 

JEROME KURSHAN 
Random Road 



Group Effort Made University Medical Center's 
85th White Elephant Rummage Sale a Success 

To the Editor: 

How many events in our community have been taking 
place for 85 years? The Auxiliary of the University Medical 
Center at Princeton's White Elephant Rummage Sale is one 
of them! It took place this past weekend at Princeton Air- 
port. It was a fabulous success due to the generosity of our 
volunteers, donors, shoppers, and the gracious cooperation 
of the Princeton Airport. We needed an under-cover space 
to hold our sale and the Princeton Airport's maintenance 
hangar proved to be a perfect solution. We greatly appreci- 
ate the generosity, flexibility, and participation of the air- 
port. We thank all those who donated and purchased items, 
and, of course, the dozens of volunteers who make our 
White Elephant possible year after year. 

LAVERNE HEBERT 

Dodds Lane 

ROSEMAR1E HUNNINGHAKE 

Kendal Park 



Building Community 

with creativity, ener g y and vision 




Bill Hearon has set his goals for Princeton: 

* Actively participate in regional planning while preserving and 
protecting Princeton's environment. 

* Provide a wide spectrum of housing to meet the needs of our 
diverse community. 

* Continue increased road maintenance and improve our safe walk- 
ways and bike paths. 

* Expand opportunities for active and passive recreation for the entire 
Princeton community. 

* Promote greater traffic control and work for increased alternative 
transportation. 

Vote Democratic on Nov. 4th 

Bill Hearon 

for Princeton Township Committee 

Let Bill hear from you at www.billhearon.com 

Paid for by Bill Hearon Campaign; Bruce Kemp, Treasurer. 




nnity 

ounseling 

"*ervice 



22 Stockton Street 

Princeton 

609-924-0060 



QUALITY, CARING, COMMITMENT 

Sliding Scale • Evening Hours 
Managed Care Approved 





The Rev. Peter K. Stlmpson 



Advice for daily living 
Family Advice Column: 

YOUTH SUICIDE 

By the Rev. Peter K. Stimpson 

QUESTION: / have read that 
the rate of suicide among chil- 
dren has increased. Is that 
true? If a child commits suicide, 
how can people help? 

ANSWER: To say the least, 
this is a complex, upsetting 
issue, about which we are only 
scratching the surface. But, 
here goes. 

1. PREVALENCE: Centers for 
Disease Control and Preven- 
tion released statistics in 1995 
that suicide rates increased 120% for children aged 
10-14 and 28% for youth aged 15-19. Also, over half a 
million children each year attempt suicide. 
2. WHY: There is no one reason. The pressure of school 
performance, glamorizing suicide in the media, a child's 
changing perception of death, personal or family emo- 
tional difficulties, drug abuse, and biochemical changes 
in the child are but a few reasons. But in discussing 
reasons, seek to understand, not blame. And, try to face 
vs. explain away what is so upsetting. 
3 COMMON REACTIONS & HOW TO HELP: You can 
help children cope with the suicide of a classmate by 
acknowledging how much they hurt, encouraging them 
to express their feelings, and letting them know what to 
expect as they grieve. Remember yourself that it is a 
process, and so strong feelings can be triggered not 
only by television coverage of the suicide days after the 
loss, but also by a movie months later about death or 
suicide. Some specific reactions and how you can help 
are: 

a. Denial: Communicate facts in a clear and concise 
way. Realize that the younger the child, the more gradu- 
ally ihey will be able to mourn their loss. So, be patient 
and available; do not push. 

b. Anger: Allow kids to express it, but avoid scape- 
goating parents or society. 

c. Guilt: Reassure kids that they did not cause the 
death, and give permission to enjoy life amidst their 
grief. 

d. Sadness: Listen with empathy, encourage discus- 
sion, and validate feelings. What might assist children to 
express their feelings is artwork if they are young, and 
writing in journals if they are older. 

e. Shame: Reassure kids that crying and talking about 
feelings is healthy and a sign of strength. A support 
group of peers will help, as will adults (especially men) 
being vulnerable in sharing their own feelings. 

4. COMMUNITY RESOURCES: You are not alone. Help 
your child cope with the death of a friend by using your 
school, church, and local counseling service. Schools, 
for example, often have organized plans and crisis 
response teams, which help children express their feel- 
ings in a controlled and organized manner, identify and 
work with the families of children thought to be at-risk, 
and help faculty through their own process of grieving. 

5. AT-RISK CHILDREN: Among children who deserve 
special attention after a suicide are: close fnends or 
"enemies" of the deceased, those who have experi- 
enced recent losses (moved to a new home away from 
fnends and family), those fascinated with death or sui- 
cide, and children who have exhibited problem behav- 
iors (depression, drug abuse, or suicide attempts of their 
own). Parents should also be watchful should there be 
an increase in physical ailments and/or a decrease in 
academic performance. 

6. NEED FURTHER HELP? I have taken many of these 
ideas from a wonderful, local resource: The New Jersey 
Adolescent Suicide Prevention Project at UNDNJ, Office 
of Prevention Services. P.O. Box 1392. Piscataway, N.J. 
08855-1392 (732-235-9250). 

This Wellness column is funded through the generosity 
of a grant from the J. Seward Johnson, Sr. Charitable 
Trusts. If you would like Father Stimpson to answer a 
question of yours on family life, daily living or emotional 
health, you can wnte to him at: Trinity Counseling Ser- 
vice, 22 Stockton Street. Pnnceton. NJ 08540. Tnnity 
Counseling Service provides clinical or pastoral counsel- 
ing on a sliding fee scale for all who need help and 
support. Phone Tnnity Counseling Service at 609-924- 
0060 to set an appointment 



Institute Scholar Receives 
Presidential Fermi Award 

Dr. John Bahcall, a profes- 
sor of natural sciences at the 
Institute for Advanced Study, 
was named Thursday as one 
of three winners of the Enrico 
Fermi Award. The presiden- 
tial award recognizes scien- 
tists of international stature 
for their lifetimes of achieve- 
ment In the development, 
use. or production of energy. 

Secretary of Energy Spen- 
cer Abraham named Dr. Bah- 
call, Dt. Raymond Davis Jr., 
and Dr. Seymour Sack as the 
recipients for the award. 

Drs. Bahcall and Davis will 
receive the award for their 
research in neutrino physics 
at a conference on October 
22 in Washington, DC. They 
will receive a gold medal and 
a citation signed by Secretary 
Abraham and President Bush. 
The two scientists will share 
an honorarium of $187,500. 

"The contributions these 
distinguished scientists have 
made to understanding the 
world around us and to our 
national security are Im- 
mense," Secretary Abraham 
said in a statement. "Their 
lifetime of innovative research 
follows in the tradition of 
Enrico Fermi, the great scien- 
tist we commemorate with 
this award." 

Enrico Fermi is credited as 
leading the first group of 
scientists who achieved the 
first self-sustained, controlled 
nuclear reaction in a lab at 
the University of Chicago in 
1942. 

Dr. Bahcall, 68, received a 
bachelors of science in phy- 
sics from the University of 
California at Berkeley in 
1956, a masters of physics 
from the University of Chi- 
cago in 1957, and a PhD 
from Harvard in 1961. Since 
1971, he has been a profes- 
sor of natural sciences at the 
Institute and a visiting lec- 
turer with the rank of profes- 
sor at Princeton University. 



20 minutes. Refreshments 
will be provided by CheTry 
Grove Farm and two local 
Girl Scout troops. The cost to 
participate is $10 and all pro- 
ceeds will benefit the shelter's 
core programs of rescue, 
shelter, health/welfare, spay/ 
neuter, adoption and humane 
education. Participants are 
encouraged to register in 
advance by calling 921-6122. 



Annual Dog Parade 
Scheduled October 19 

SAVE, Princeton's animal 
shelter, Is hosting its annual 
dog parade on Sunday, from 
1-3 p.m. Halloween costumes 
are optional. Registration Is 
at noon in front of the Gar- 
den Theater on Nassau 
Street. All participants will 
receive a bandana designed 
by Temple Dog Graphics 
Design, a doggie bag filled 
with donated treats, and two 
free passes to the Garden 
Theater. 

The walk ends at Borough 
Hall and is expected to last 




PATRICIA'S 

HAIR D£SIGfl 

357 flassau Street 
683-4114 

Tuesday-Saturday 8am-5pm 



Free Guitar Lessons 
For Beginners 

Guitarist Ed Hermann Jr. 
will be conducting a free, 
hands-on clinic for beginning 
guitarists on October 1 7 from 
7 to 9 p.m. at the Music & 
Arts Center, located on Route 
1 in the Mercer Mall. Mr. 
Hermann is a musician, song- 
writer and guitar instructor. 



The workshop will be 
geared towards students who 
have been playing guitar for 
just a few months or who 
have never played at all. The 
material covered will be 
appropriate for both electric 
and acoustic guitars. To re- 
gister or Inquire about renting 
a guitar for the clinic, call 
9879595. 




A-DOOR-A-PET I 

I 



t 



Adonng Daily, 

Overnight or Long Term 

Care Available 

(or your Pels 

Lisa Watson 
609-921-2471 






o 

n 

M 

j 
x 



Dedicated ~ Insightful 
Responsive ~ Experienced 




Joe O'Neill for Mayor, Princeton Borough 

Borough Council (2 years) 

Princeton Regional Planning Board ( 1 6 years) 

Public Works Committee 
Liaison to: 

Joint Recreation Board 
Human Services Commission 
Princeton Housing Authority 



Wendy Benchley for Borough Council 

Borough Council (4 years) 
Princeton Regional Planning Board (6 years) 
Circulation Committee 
Master Plan Committee 
Ad Hoc Committee on High School Parking 
Plaza Art Committee 
Liaison to: 

Traffic and Transportation Committee 
Joint Environmental Commission 
Borough Shade Tree Commission 
Central Jersey Transportation Planning Commission 

Peggy Karcher for Borough Council 

Borough Council (3 years) 

Borough Finance Committee 

Public Safety Committee 
Fire Commissioner 

Borough Housing and Redevelopment (Corporation 

Liaison to: 

Princeton Regional Health Commission 
Princeton Alcohol and Drug Alliance 
Borough Affordable Housing Board 

Paid for by Princeton Borough Campaign, David Gotdfarb. Treasurer, PO Box 481. Prinoelon, NJ 08540. 




WRITERS TALK: Three of Princeton's authors spoke to a full house at 
Barnes & Noble on Friday night. Emily Mann, (standing), read from a new 
script, Joyce Carol Oates read a children's book she authored and Paul 
Muldoon shared some of his poetry. <«»/<> *w*«s/ww 



Frank the Barber 

Complete Hair Care 
for Men & Women 

We Do Roller Sets 




863 l(t«* 206, Princeton (rear entran< 
921-1834 






Patriot Act Resolution 

Conlnued Irom Page 1 

but that the borough is 
against certain aspects of the 
Patriot Act. "The mayor and 
Council reaffirm their support 
for Increased security mea- 
sures to protect our citizenry 
from terrorist attacks, but 
also believe that such security 
must be provided only in a 
manner which will not unduly 
and unneccesarily infringe 
upon the constitutional and 
other rights and liberties of 
the American people," reads 
the resolution. 




Approximately 15 Borough 
residents came to the meeting 
to present the resolution to 
Council. These residents are 
part of an organization they 
call Citizens Opposed to the 
Patriot Act Formed in July 
by Peter Wolanin, group 
members have met regularly 
to research the Patriot Act 
and find ways in which they 
can combat it. 

Karen Pizarro, one of the 
organization's members, said 
she was happy the council 
decided to pass the resolu- 
tion. "I am proud that Prince- 
ton, a world-class learning 
community, Is now among 
those communities challeng- 
ing and opposing the Patriot 
Act," she said. During the 
meeting she cited three other 
similar college towns that 
have passed a resolution 
against the Act, Cambridge, 
Ann Arbor and Amherst. 

Four women from the orga- 
nization, including Ms. 
Plzairo, spoke in front of 
Council to argue why the res- 
olution should be passed. 
While the Borough adopted 
resolutions opposing the war 
In Iraq and the Impeachment 
of President Bill Clinton, the 
resolution was discussed and 
debated by Council for 
approximately an hour. 

"If (the resolution) doesn't 
directly affect the work of 
Princeton Borough, we 
shouldn't address It here," 
said Council member David 
Goldfarb. 

Councllwoman Peggy 
Karcher agreed. "I'm not 
going to support (the resolu- 
tion], not because I'm for the 
Patriot Act, because I'm not," 
she said. "This is just not the 
best forum for us to vote on 
these Issues." 

However other Borough 
Council members said that 
what was Important was what 
the resolution stood for. 
Councilman Roger Martlndell 
said that while the Patriot Act 
Is a national Issue, it affects 
the community and families 
that live In Princeton. 



Mayor Reed said he was 
recendy affected by the works 
of the Patriot Act when he 
received a letter from the 
State Office of CounterteTTor- 
ism warning against domestic 
terrorists. However the letter 
asked that the mayor keep 
the information private. 
"What really got me was that 
it said that under no circum- 
stances should this [letter) be 
distributed to the public," he 
said. 

The resolution passed, with 
three votes against, Peggy 
Karcher, David Goldfarb and 
Mildred Trotman, and three 
votes in favor, Roger 
Martindell, Wendy Benchley 
and Joseph O'Neill. The 
mayor voted in favor of the 
resolution, breaking the tie. 

Ms. Pizarro said the organi- 
zation's next step will be to 
take the resolution to the 
state, and convince New Jer- 
sey to pass a state resolution 
against the Patriot Act, just 
as Alaska, Hawaii, New Mexi- 
co, and Vermont have done. 

"This sends a message to 
Congress that ordinary citi- 
zens are extremely concerned 
about any infringement upon 
our liberties," she said. 

— Candace Braun 



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Councllwoman Wendy 
Benchley, who appeared to 
be the strongest advocate of 
the resolution, spoke up sev- 
eral times in favor of passing 
It. "I will support this," she 
said. "If there Is any (Issue) 
that affects us on a local lev- 
el, this does." 



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Historical Society 

Continued from Page 1 

is reversible, and no harsh 
chemical treatments are done 
— everything is water- 
soluble," she said. 

The conservation process is 
not cheap, however. The His- 
torical Society has hired a 
professional conservator to 
begin work on selected items. 
Preliminary estimates put the 
cost of cleaning and conser- 
vation of the entire collection 
at roughly $60,000. In light 
of these costs, the Historical 
Society has received an 
$18,000 grant from the New 
Jersey Historical Commission 
to facilitate the conservation 
process. 

Concerns Quelled 

Ms. Smyth tried to quell the 
concerns of antique furniture 
connoisseurs who recognize a 
definitive difference between 
processes of conservation 
and restoration by emphasiz- 
ing the Historical Society's 
time, money, and effort that 
will be expended in dealing 
with a project of this magni- 
tude and importance. 

"We totally have our eyes 
on the ball," she said before 
concluding her comments 
with a general sentiment 
regarding the project. "This is 
a big deal for us." 



The donation is an impor- 
tant event for the Princeton 
community, as well as visitors 
to the area. Dee Patberg, 
president of the Historical 
Society, said that in the four 
years the organizations 
website has been active, 60 
percent of the inquiries com- 
ing in online have been 
"about Einstein and his life in 
[Princeton]." 

"This is a gift which we will 
be privileged to restore and 
preserve for the community," 
Ms; Patberg said. 

Anyone familiar with Bain- 
bridge House and its spatial 
capacities will wonder where 
an additional 65 pieces of 
furniture and artifacts will be 
stored. According to Ms. 
Stem, most of the furniture 
will be kept in an "undis- 
closed space for safety pur- 
poses." She added that the 
storage space is climate con- 
trolled, safe, and secure. The 
Historical Society Is planning 
on using the second floor of 
Bainbrldge for a room 
devoted to Einstein. Current- 
ly, that space is used for offic- 
es, a conference area, and 
the Historical Society Library. 
Conversion of this second 
floor space will take some 
time and a considerable 
amount of fundraising, Ms. 
Stern said. 




EINSTEIN'S ARMCHAIR: This upholstered tub arm- 
chair from Albert Einstein's home will be part of 
the "Einstein Room" exhibit at the Princeton His- 
torical Society. The Historical Society will need to 
make room on the second floor of Bainbridge 
House in order to showcase the furniture. 

(Pelv C Cook, o Hislonal Society ol Punceton) 



Let 

Democratic Candidate 

for Township Committee 

Bill Hearon 

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www.billhearon.com 

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Einstein Room 

The planned 'Einstein 
Room' itself is not going to 
be so much a recreation of 
his Princeton domicile, but 
more of a representation of 
the man. his achievements, 
and a look into his private 
life. 

"We're not going to try to 
recreate a room In his 
house," Ms. Stem said. "We 
plan to use some furnishings 
and artifacts to interpret his 
life." 

The Historical Society's 
acquisition represents a tri- 
umph for a Princeton commu- 
nity that, while having an 
impact on the outside world, 
likes to keep its legacies local 
as well. At Thursday 
evening's reception, Ms. 
Stem offered the seemingly 
obvious but overlooked alter- 
nate destination for Mr. Ein- 
stein's possessions. 

"We know the Smithsonian 
would have been very happy 
with (the furniture)," she said 
before a both jovial and 
thankful ovation. 

—Matthew Hersh 



Princeton Library to Host 
Teen Poetry Slam 

In honor of Teen Read 
Week, Princeton Public 
Library will host a poetry 
slam for students grades six 
through 12 on Friday, Octo- 
ber 17 at 7:30 p.m. 

Middle school students will 
be Invited to read from 7:30- 
8:30 p.m. and high school 
students from 8:30-10 p.m. 
While the poetry slam will 
continue until 10 p.m.. the 
library will close for all other 
patrons at 9 p.m. Poet Noah 
Hertz-Bunzl, a Princeton High 
School student, will serve as 
slam master for the event. 

Princeton Public Library is 
located at 301 North Harri- 
son Street In Princeton Shop- 
ping Center. For additional 
Information call 924-9529. 



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Coalition for Peace Action 
Hosts Annual Conference 

The Princeton-based Coali- 
tion for Peace Action will 
host the 2003 Peace Action 
National Congress. The three- 
day conference will begin Fri- 
day, November 7 and will fea- 
ture peace and justice 
activists from across the 
country. The conference will 
conclude on Sunday, Novem- 
ber 9 with an Interfaith Ser- 
vice for Peace sponsored by 
the Peace Action Education 
Fund and the Princeton Uni- 
versity Chapel. 

Scheduled for Friday are 
the Woman's Caucus, and 
Afternoon Plenary and Mini- 
Plenary Sessions on National 
Strategy, and an evening 
book-signing event. 

Saturday's events Include 
panel discussions on a cam- 
paign for a new foreign poli- 
cy, peace and justice leader- 
ship workshops, and evening 
music supplied by Stephan 
Smith. 

Sunday's Interfaith service 
will feature preaching by the 
immediate past Archbishop of 
Canterbury, the Most Rev. 
George Carey. Afternoon 
speakers include U.S. Repre- 
sentative Barbara Lee of the 
9th District of California. Ms. 
Lee was the only dissenting 
member of the House's action 
on Afghanistan roll-call vote; 
Dr. Cornel West, professor of 
religion at Princeton Universi- 
ty, will speak on the issues of 
race and religion; and Dr. 
Richard Falk, a professor 
emeritus of International law 
at Princeton University and 
the chair of the Nuclear Age 
Peace Foundation, will speak 
on International law and 
peacemaking, and human 
rights. 

Registration for all three 
days Is $85 for members, and 
$25 for students. Registration 
for Sunday's Interfaith Ser- 
vice only Is $ 1 5 for members, 
$20 for non-members, and 
m $10 for individuals with lim- 

■ ited Income. Online reglstra- 
I tlon can be found at 
| www.peacecoaltion.com. For 

■ more Information, call (609) 
i 924-5022. 




Watershed to Conduct 
Wildflower Search 

The Stony Brook-Millstone 
Watershed Association Is con- 
ducting a hike and fall wild- 
flower search for children 
ages 6-9 on Thursday. Octo- 
ber 16 from 4-5:30 p.m. The 
children will make crafts with 
the wildflowers they gather. 

The fee is $6 for Watershed THEORIES OF FENG SHUI: This late 19th century 
members and $9 for non- German oak cabinet was a piece that Einstein 
members. To register or for used to furnish his home in Princeton. It is now 
additional Information, call part of the Albert Einstein furniture collection at 
the Buttinger Nature Center the Historical Society of Princeton. 

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Harry's Brook Flooding 

C^rtrurtfccmPaof ' 

due. in part, to water runoff 
from new construction 
upstream and recent road 
improvements along the Har- 
ry s Brook Basin. Committee 
members listened as Olivia 
Applegate of Random Road 
spoke of saturated grounds, 
irreversible damage to prop- 
erties, and potentially hazard- 
ous situations for children. 

"We are concerned with fur- 
ther unregulated development 
upstream, and massive devel- 
opment on environmentally 
sensitive lots within the 
Basin," Ms. Applegate said In 
her opening statement to the 
committee. 



The development issue is a 
relatively new aspect to the 
Issue, the flooding, however, 
is not. The topography of 
Harry's Basin is more than 
400,000 years old, and 
floods had consistently 
occurred in the region before 
substantial development exist- 
ed. The brook originates at 
Lake Carnegie, which is the 
site of the current state DOT 
construction of the new Har- 
ry's Brook Bridge, and sepa- 
rates into two main tributar- 
ies. Harry's Brook ends Just 
west of Harrison Street, and 
the North Branch tributary 
travels north toward Terhune 
Road. 

Ms. Applegate said that her 
property falls below the con- 
fluence of the two streams 
and that properties in that 
region are subjected to sud- 
den flood areas approxi- 
mately 300 feet wide. 

She also asked the Commit- 
tee to look into Immediate 
solutions to improve current 
conditions of the area. 

The Township must first 
Implement the protection of 
environmentally sensitive 
areas, find ways to alleviate 
present flooding conditions 
along Harry's Brook, and 
Immediately impose strict 
rules to control runoff from 
all construction," she said. 

Deputy Mayor Bill Enslln, 
who presided over the meet- 
ing In Mayor Phyllis March- 
and's absence, backed Ms. 
Applegate's concerns, saying 
that the area needs constant 
supervision to prevent further 
damage. 

"A stream corridor In a 
built-out community needs 
focus," he said. 



Princeton Township Engi- 
neer Robert KiseT said that 
certain plans of action pro- 
posed by the Township, while 
not eliminating the threat of 
flooding completely, can dras- 
tically reduce the worries of 
residents each time storm 
clouds appear on the horizon. 
The Township Engineering 
Department recommends lim- 
iting impervious surfaces on 
new expansions added to 
single-family lots. This would 
limit surface area on drive- 
ways, patios, pools, tennis 
courts, and other surfaces 
that can lead to higher-than- 
normal amounts of rainwater 
run-off during rainstorms. 

Mr. Riser has said that 
while there is no quick fix to 
the flooding problems, the 
Township Is "looking ahead" 
to regulate construction on 
what appears to be a "large 
subdivision occurring in the 
Township." 

"The Township will look to 
the future to see what can be 
done to prevent this flooding 
from getting significantly 
worse," Mr. Riser said Tues- 
day. In addition to expansion 



limitations, he cited purchases 
of land parcels made by the 
Township to stave off over- 
development in the area. 

In the meantime, residents 
will have to deal with the 
flooding, but it is no easy 
task. Madeleine Wallmark. of 
Littlebrook Road, described 
the task of water removal 
after a storm. 

"You can't get rid of six feet 
of water with a sump pump," 
she said. 

—Matthew Hersh 



Middle of the Night 

Can't find your 
TOWN TOPICS! 

Take a stroll 

down lo our office 

at 4 mercer street where 

you can now purchase a copy 

from our new coin-operated 

paper box, 

24 hours/7 days a week. 

(P.S. two quarters required) 



FALL 

IS FOR 

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PRINCETON NASSAU PEDIATRICS, P.A. 

is pleased to announce 
the opening of its 

NEW WEST WINDSOR OFFICE 

at 

196 Princeton-Hightstown Road 

Windsor Business Park 

West Windsor, NJ 08550 

609-799-5335 




gional Study of the Contcm- formed by the Miracle of 

porary Middle East, North Fatima Touring Company on 

Africa and Central Asia. For Saturday, November 22 at 8 

additional information call p.m., and Sunday, November 

Letitia Ufford at 921-8085. 23 at 3 p.m.. at Notre Dame 

High School. 601 Lawrence 

Road. Lawrenceville. 

St. Paul Parish To Hold ,. Th f,? la & k wlf S! an , d 

•Ei« i t r *• » directed by Barbara Oleynick- 

Miracle of ratima d^^ is bas€d on me 0ctf> . 

St. Paul Parish Church Is ber 13. 1917 Miracle of the 
sponsoring The Miracle of Sun. which was foretold by 
Fatima." a musical play per- three children and witnessed 



by nearly 70.000 people In 
Fatima. The play conveys the 
message of peace from this 
prophetic event through a 
musical reenactment. 

Tickets are $25 for adults 
and $15 for children, and can 
be purchased by calling (609) 
924-7587. ext. 122. More 
information can also be found 
by visiting www. fatima 
musical.net. 



THE LIBRARY SALE DATE IS BOOKED: The Friends of the Princeton Public 
Library Annual Book Sale will take place from Friday, October 17 through 
Sunday, October 19. Members of the Friends Council and volunteers will 
staff the event. From left are committee-members Paul Budline, Nancy 
Klath, Chairperson Barbara Freedman, Bruce Kemp, Pam Wakefield, and 
Stuart Mitchner. Committeewoman Meg Michael is not pictured. 



Donated Books, Records 
To Be Sold at Library 

The Friends of the Prince- 
ton Public Library Annual 
Book Sale will take place In 
the meeting room at the 
library's temporary Princeton 
Shopping Center location 
from Friday, October 17 
through Sunday, October 19. 

The sale will feature nearly 
1,000 jazz records and 
approximately 10,000 used, 
donated books. Sale proceeds 
are part of the Friends contri- 
bution to the library for the 
purchase of books, eds, and 
audio and video cassettes to 
support programs for chil- 
dren and adults. 

The records were donated 
by an area jazz fan with a 
specialized interest in the 
period between 1920 and 
1950. The collection includes 
several imports and features 
most of the major jazz figures 
of the time. 

A preview sale is scheduled 
for Friday, October 17, from 
12 noon to 2 p.m. Admission 
is free for members of the 
Friends, $5 for non-members. 
Numbered admission tickets 
will be available starting at 
10 a.m. 

From 2 to 5:30 p.m., and 
for the subsequent two days 
of the sale, there will be no 
admission fee. Hours for the 
Saturday sale are 9 a.m. to 
5:30 p.m., and for Sunday's 



Annual Half Price Day, hours 
are 1 to 5 p.m. 

Donations of books in good 
condition may be made at 
any time during the year by 
leaving them at the Library's 
Returns Desk. Textbooks, 
encyclopedias, and magazines 
cannot be accepted. Because 
of limited storage space at 
the temporary Shopping Cen- 
ter location, call (609) 924- 
9529, ext. 255 before deliv- 
ering any large donations. 

For more Information on 
the Annual Book Sale, call 
(609)924-1209. 



Author Paul Watkins 
To Read at Library 

Wednesday, October 22, 
Paul Watkins will be at the 
Princeton Public Library at 
7:30 p.m. Mr. Watkins is the 
accomplished author of seven 
novels and a memoir. His first 
novel, Night Over Day Over 
Night, was nominated for the 
Booker Prize. Calm at Sun- 
set, Calm at Dawn won the 
Encore Prize for best second 
novel. He was short listed for 
the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize 
in 1992 and 1996 and won 
the Winifred Holtby Prize for 
Best Regional Novel of the 
Year In 1996. His latest nov- 
el, The Forger, is a tale of 
World War II In Paris and the 
secret battle to save the city's 
masterpieces from the Nazis. 

Mr. Watkins is Writer-in- 



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Residence at the Peddle 
School in Hightstown and has 
traveled extensively research- 
ing for his books. 

At the library, Mr. Watkins 
will be reading from his book 
Stand Before Your God: An 
American Schoolboy in 
England. The book is an 
autobiographical account of 
his years at The Dragon 
School and Eton. 

A question and answer 
period will follow his reading, 
and several of his books will 
be available for purchase and 
signing. 

Princeton Public Library is 
located at 301 North Harri- 
son Street in the Princeton 
Shopping Center. 



Arab-American to 
Speak on Foreign Policy 

Dr. Hussein Ibish, commu- 
nications director of the 
American-Arab Anti-Discri- 
mination Committee and vice 
president of the National 
Coalition to Protect Political 
Freedom, is giving a talk on 
October 19 at 4 p.m. 

The talk is titled "A Critique 
of United States' Foreign Pol- 
Icy." The event will be held at 
the Frist Campus Center and 
Is co-sponsored by the 
Princeton Middle East Society 
and Princeton University's 
International Center, Pro- 
gram in Near Eastern Studies, 
and Institute for the Transre- 



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Franklin Park Man 
Dies After Collision 
On Route 27 

A Franklin Park man died 
of injuries sustained after his 
motorcycle apparently 
crossed into the oncoming 
lane of traffic on Route 27 
near Poe Road, and crashed 
with a Subaru Wagon. 

David Vena. 39. of FrankJin 
Park, sustained fatal internal 
and head injuries when his 
Harley Davidson motorcycle 
crashed head-on with the 
le driven by Mark L. 
Autln, 55. of Riverside Drive. 
Princeton. The accident 
occurred at about 1:30 a.m. 
Friday. 

When patrols arrived at the 
scene. Mr. Vena was unres- 
ponsive and located on the 
southbound shoulder of 
Route 27. Lifesaving mea- 
sures were initiated by both 
Princeton Township police 
officers and members of the 
Princeton first Aid Squad. 
Mr. Vena was transported to 
the University Medical Center 
at Princeton, and although 
lifesaving measures contin- 
ued, Mr. Vena's injuries 
proved fatal and he was pro- 
nounced dead at 2:20 a.m. 

No charges have been 
m.ide, and the incident 
remains under investigation. 



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READY, SET, GO: Fred Samara, head track coach at Princeton University, 
shoots the starter pistol to begin the children's' race during Community 

a y . i ptK "° & V)ltnt Sn """ 



In a separate Route 27 traf- 
fic accident, Anne Brachelli, 
38, of Franklin Park, was 
charged with DWI and care- 
less driving after she lost con- 
trol of her car and struck 
sand-filled construction bar- 
rels that were on the right 
side of the roadway. Ms. 
Brachelli was travelling south- 
bound near Shadybrook Lane 
at about 11 p.m. on Thurs- 
day. 

A three-car collision 
occurred on State Road at 
Ewing Street on Tuesday, 
October 7, at mid-afternoon 
when the driver of a Honda 
Civic was struck from behind 
and pushed into the path of 
oncoming traffic. Dana 
Hawryluk, 26, of Franklin 
Lakes, stopped her car on 
State Road to make a left- 
hand turn when she was 
struck by a 2001 Ford van 
driven by Alfredo Altamiran- 
da, 43, of Furlong, Pa. 

The force of the impact 
pushed her vehicle into the 
path of northbound traffic, 
and Fabio Lorenzotu, 45, of 
Genoa. Italy, driving a 2004 
GMC van, struck the vehicle. 

Two people were trans- 
ported to University Medical 
Center at Princeton for non- 
life threatening injuries. Mr. 
Altamiranda was issued a 
summons for careless driving. 



and providing alcohol to a The victim backed away 
minor. and let the suspect flee after 

He was transported to he got up and placed his 
police headquarters and band on his waistband as if 
released with several com- he had a weapon. The victim 
plaint summonses. found shoes in the vicinity 

Four Princeton University mat were P resumab, V stolen 
students were arrested on Fri- b V me suspect. 

day after police responded to 

a call of an unresponsive Pan sweaters an(J Qther 
male at Spelman Hall The jtems va|ued about $3 00Q 
students were Alex Ryder, 



were stolen from the Ann 

, Taylor retail store on Palmer 

vaughan, 21, of Gar and, c m * c *. j 

t« u *u i oi to Square west on Saturday. 

Tx., Heath Jones, 21, of Bur- -ru • -j * ^ j 

\\r- j d en The incident was reported 

gaw, N.C., and Bruce Self, c j j a 

' Sunday, and no suspects 

have been identified. 



21, of Salem, Ore., Jason 



21, of Independence, Va. 



Mr. Ryder and Mr. Vaughan 
were charged with possession 



A $450 Trek 4500 bike 



of a controlled dangerous was reported stolen from a 
substance (marijuana) and Princeton University student 
being under the influence of a parking lot on Thursday 
controlled dangerous sub- between 1:15 p.m. and 10 
stance. And Mr. Jones and 
Mr. Self were charged with 
possession of a controlled 
dangerous substance (mari- 
juana), being under the influ 



p.m. 



Anthony Hagler of Ewing 
was stopped by Borough 
Police Sgt. Robert Currier for 
a motor vehicle violation on 
John Street late Sunday. 

Mr. Hagler, 44, presented a 
fictitious Insurance card to 
the officer, for which he was 
placed under arrest. Then, 
the contractor was found to 
be In possession of marijua- 
na. He was charged with pos- 
session of a controlled dan- 
gerous substance and 
possession of a fictitious 
Insurance card. 

Subsequently, at police 
headquarters. It was found 
that Mr. Hagler was wanted 
on warrants from Princeton 
Township. Hamilton Town- 
ship, and Trenton Municipal 
Courts. 

Princeton saw a number of 
other arrests for drug posses- 
sion last week. After bike 
Patrolmen John Furyk and 
William Perez observed him 
and others drinking alcohol in 
the Woodrow Wilson School 
fountain area off Washington 
Road. Garrick Leenhouts. 18. 
of Snowden Lane, was 
arrested Friday and charged 
with possession of a con- 
trolled dangerous substance 
(marijuana), possession of 
drug paraphernalia, posses- 
sion of alcohol by a minor. 



A report of lewdness was 
made by a jogger who was oh 
the D&R Canal tow path near 
ence of a controlled danger- Alexander Road. The jogger 
ous substance, and ooserveo « a male standing 
possession of drug parapher- naked undcr the ral | roa 5 
nalla. bridge. Police were notified 

but were unable to identify 

Alex Alexidze, of Brooklyn, any suspects. 

N.Y., was arrested Thursday 

for shoplifting and harass- Following a verbal argu- 
ment after the 28-year-old m ent on Clay Street, police 
allegedly left the Princeton arrested a Newark man, 
University Store with music employed as a laborer in Lin- 
compact discs for which he den. After arriving on the 
hadn't paid. scene it was found that David 

Mr. Alexidze was observed Brown, 28, had an active 
by a store-loss prevention warrant from the East Wind- 
officer, who followed Mr. sor Township Municipal 
Alexidze and confronted him Court for his arrest. He was 
on campus. But Mr. Alexidze turned over to the East Wind- 
pushed the store employee sor police In default of ball 
and ran. The store worker set at $970. 
caught up with him again, but Several other warrant 
was pushed and threatened arrests were made last week 
verbally. Eventually, Mr. Alex- in relation to moving viola- 
Idze ran off campus, only to tions. Carlton Jay Evans, 24, 
be stopped by Princeton Uni- f Sklllman, was stopped on 
verslty security department Q m Road and arrested on an 
officers, who arrested Mr. active motor vehicle warrant 
Alexidze with assistance from from the Franklin Township 
Borough Police Ptl. Courtney Municipal Court. Westmin- 
Heller. ster Choir College student 

After processing, Mr. Alex- Youn Hong, 27, of Plains- 
Idze was released on $1,500 boro, was stopped on Harri- 
bail and a court date was set son Street, and arrested on 
for October 20. The music an active motor vehicle war- 
CDs were worth $119.82. rant from the Highland Park 

Municipal Court. And David 

Princeton Borough Police Craparotta, 28, of Hamilton. 

responded to a call from a was stopped on Stockton 
Stanworth Lane resident Street, and arrested on an 
reporting a burglary early active motor vehicle warrant 
Sunday. The victim was at from the Belmar Municipal 
home when he heard his Court, 
kitchen door open and close. 
Upon Investigating the sound, 
he saw a suspect standing in 
his kitchen and asked what 
he was doing. The suspect, 
reported to be about 5 8 and 
195 lbs., fled the house with 
the victim in pursuit. After 
chasing the suspect, the vic- 
tim tackled him. and the pair 
WTestled briefly. 



Tell Them 

You Saw 

Their Ad 

in Town Topics 




Mothers and More. 

Princeton area chapter meet 
the first and third Thursday of 
every month at Lawrence Day 
School on Carter Road. For 
additional information call 
333-8913 or log 
www.princetonol.com/ 
groups/female. 



Library. 2751 Brunswick 
Pike. Lawrenceville. 

The topic will be 
announced at the time of the 
meeting. Members, families, 
friends, and the general pub- 
lic are invited to attend 

The meeting is free and 
open to the public. For fur- 
ther information call (201) 
791-7868. 



sub-tropical to arctic condi- 
tions in the mountains. Mrs. 
Horn's knowledge of wild- 
flowers, nature and birds will 
help bring Nepal to life. For 
reservations and additional 
information call Joan 
Schluter at 409-7277. 



on 



Gay People of Princeton 

meet the first and third 
Thursday of every month 
from 8 to 10 p.m. at the 
Princeton Unitarian Church 
on Cherry Hill Road. For 
additional information call 
410-7129 or log on 
www.gaypeopleprinceton.co- 
m 



Princeton Family YMCA 
Executive Club is having 
their 42nd annual dinner at 6 
p.m. on October 16, at 
YMCA of Princeton. The 
guest speaker will be Art 
Buchwald. For additional 
information call 497-9622 
extension 210. 



Princeton Singles will 
meet for breakfast on Octo- 
ber 17 at 9 a.m at Friendly 's 
Restaurant on Route 206 
North in Montgomery. 



Princeton Singles will 

meet for a canal walk on Sat- 
urday. October 18 at 10 a.m. 
at the Winepress Restaurant 
in Kingston. For additional 
Information call 896-1170. 



The Mercer Branch of 
the Lupus Foundation of 
America, Inc/New Jersey 
Chapter, will hold Its 
monthly meeting on Wednes- 
day, October 16, at 7:30 
p.m. at Mercer County 



The Woman's Club of 
Princeton is hosting a free 
lecture by Betty Horn titled 
"Trekking in Nepal". The pre- 
sentation will be held on 
October 16 at 1p.m. at Buck- 
ingham Place, 155 Raymond 
Road in Princeton Located 
near Tibet and India, Nepal is 
a land of extreme contrast in 
climate and geography, from 




CHESSforum 



The Bayonet Attack is the 
most formidable response 
to the King's Indian 
Defense. When I was play- 
ing in the World Open this 
summer, I attended a lec- 
ture by GM Jon Fedorowicz. 
He is one of several devoted 
KID players who had 
decided to give it up 
because of the Bayonet. 

Like the Sicilian Defense, 
the KID Bayonet Attack 
usually results in a sector 
war. Black attempts to 
expand on the kingside with 
...f5, ...f4, ...g5, etc. and 
white initiates the attack 
with his expansion 10.b4. 

The reason why white's 
queenside expansion Is so 
strong Is because It is usu- 
ally easier for white's pawns 
to break down black's 
queenside than it Is for 
black's pawns to break 
down white's kingside. They 
simply get there faster. 

The open files and bad 
pawn structure lead to a 
white initiative. 1 believe 
that the only way black has 
a legitimate chance against 
the Bayonet is if he Is will- 
ing to sacrifice some queen- 
side pieces in return for 
time. If he can break down 
the white kingside defense 
while black Is busy scooping 
up useless queenside piec- 
es, then black may have a 
chance at a quick check- 
mate. Although I must 
admit, white has several 
methods of stifling an 
attack. 

In this week's featured 
game, black attempts to 
seek compensation through 
an open f-file by playing 
ll...fxe4 Instead of the 
more normal ll...f4. As H 
turns out, the open file 
never gave him an attack. 
In the end, white's central 
domination and superior 
piece placement, coupled 
with black's poor queenside 
pawn structure resulted in a 
lost game for black. 

The lesson here is before 
you decide to play the KID, 
make sure you know that 
somebody is Just waiting to 
stab with the Bayonet. 

—Chad lieberman 

Sberbakov, R. (2570) • 
McDonald. N. 

Hastings, 1993 




Solution at bottom 
White to mate in two. 



3.Nc3 

4.e4 

5Be2 

6.Nf3 

7.0-0 

8.d5 

9.Nd2 

10.b4 

ll.Qc2 

12.Ncxe4 

13.M3 

14Bg5 

15.Bxf6 

16.c5 

17.Radl 

18Bc4 

19c6 

20.cxb7 

21.Rfel 

22Bb3 

23.Rcl 

24Ba4 

25a3 

26Qd2 

27.Nxd4 

28Bc2 

29Bd3 

30Ng3 

31Re2 

32Bxg6 

33.Be4 

34Rxe4 

35.Rxf4 

36Qxf4 

37.Nh5 

38.Nxg7 

39Rxc7+ 

40.Kfl 

41Rcl 

42Rdl 

43Rxd3 

44Ke2 

45Re3+ 

46Re7 

47Rxa7 

48Kf3 

49g4 

50Rh7 

51.Rxh6 

52g5 

53Ke4 

54Rd6 

55 g6 

56f4 

57f5 

58g7 

59Ke3 



Bg7 
d6 
0-0 

e5 
Nc6 
Ne7 
Nd7 

f5 
fxe4 
Nf5 
Nf6 
Qe8 
Bxf6 
Bg7 
Bd7 

h6 

Bc8 

Bxb7 

Bc8 

Qd8 

Rf7 

Rb8 

Ba6 

Nd4 

exd4 

Qh4 

Bb7 

Rbf8 

Bxd5 

Rf6 

Bxe4 

Rf4 

Qxf4 

Rxf4 

Re4 

Kxg7 

Kf6 

d3 

Rh4 

Rxh2 

RhW 

Ke5 

Kd4 

Rbl 

Rb2* 

d5 
Kd3 
Rb3 

d4 
Kc2+ 

d3 

Rxa3 

Ra8 

Rb8 

d2 
Rxb4+ 
Black Resigns 



Carolyn Yoder will speak 
on the writing of history for 

children at the October 20 WORKING AND CELEBRATING TOGETHER: Single People Contributing to 
meeting of the Women's Society (SIPECOS) is having a fundraising gala at Princeton Westin Hotel on 
College Club of Princeton, October 25 to benefit the affordable housing programs of Habitat For 
at 1 p.m. in the Parish Hall of Humanity. Six hundred people are expected to attend for dining, dancing, 
All Saints' Church, 16 All an( j ot her party activities. Pictured from left to right are Habitat volunteers: 
Saints Road A club member, Jessica Miranda, Peter Madison, Richard Miranda and John Finnegan. For 
Ms. Yoder is currently senior additional information go to www.SIPECOS.com 

editor of history for the chil- 

dren's magazine Highlights 
and writer/editor for Jersey 
Journeys, the student publica- 
tion of the New Jersey Histo- 
rical Society. In her talk, she 
will discuss her latest book, 
George Washington, the 
Writer: A Treasury of Let- 
ters, Diaries, and Public 
Documents, which will be 
available for purchase and 
signing. 

There will be light refresh- 
ments after the talk. The 
meeting is open to the public. 

The Women's College Club 
offers a variety of programs 
and awards scholarships to 
young women graduates of 
Princeton-area secondary 
schools. For Information 
about club activities and 
membership, call 609-924- 
2598 or 609-921-8575. 



NAM1 Mercer NJ, Inc., 

the Mercer County affiliate of 
the National Alliance for the 
Mentally 111, will hold a talk, 
"How the Family Can Help," 
led by Dr. Michael P. Glantl- 
nl, at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, 
October 21 In the Lawrence- 
ville branch of the Mercer 
County Library. 

Dr. Giantini is an adjunct 
assistant professor at LaSalle 
University In Philadelphia, 
and has a private practice in 
Trenton, covering mental Ill- 
ness, family therapy and 
addictions. He will discuss 
approaches to two common, 
Important and difficult chal- 
lenges families face when 
dealing with a mentally III 
family member. 

Dr. Giantlnl's talk will high- 
light the importance of family 
education and support in the 
treatment of brain disorders, 
a factor that is becoming 
Increasingly well researched 
and documented by therapists 
and psychiatrists. 

Admission Is free and 
everyone is welcome to 
attend. For more information 
call (609) 777-9766. 



space. Special recognition 
will also be given to the Law- 
rence Township and City of 
Trenton Police Departments 
and their Domestic Violence 
Victim Response Teams. 

Ms. Gibson began her 
involvement with Woman- 
space as a staff member In 
1990; she was elected to the 
board of directors In 1995. 
Andrew Strauss, her hus- 
band, shares her commitment 
to Womanspace. He designed 
and helped implement the 
main database for members 
and donors In 1995. 

After moving to Ohio In 
1996, Ms. Gibson and Mr. 
Strauss remained In touch 
with Womanspace. Returning 
to Mercer County In 1999, 
they accepted the responsibil- 
ity of co-chalring the Cam- 
paign for Womanspace, and 
Ms. Gibson was again elected 
to the Board of Directors. 

Cost of the Annual Meeting 
Is $30 per person. For reser- 
vations and information call 
394-0136. 



Fifties Plus Singles 

meets at 7 p.m. for conversa- ' 
tlon and a bite to eat on the 
second and fourth Thursday 1 
of every month at Princeton 
YMCA on Paul Robeson 
Place. $1 If you bring a cov- 
ered dish to share, $5 If you 
do not. 



Recycling 

MONDAY 

For 
Borough 

and 
Township 



Sail Away Cruises & lours 
609-799-6313 

Nikki Epstein MCC 

Serving discerning travelers .. 
|d» more than 10 years 

Cruises - Land lours 
Groups - Fund Raising __ 







^ '^ YOUR FUTURE DOESN'T HAVE TO BE A MYSTERY 



Professional and Busi- 
ness Singles Network Is 

hosting a drop-in cocktail 
social In the Old City Grille In 
the Radlsson Hotel In Prince- 
ton on Sunday, October 26 
from 5:30 to 9 p.m. Member- 
ship not required, admission 
Is $10. 





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Marriage • Career • Health 
Tarot Cards • Crystals 
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Womanspace is celebrat- 
ing new partnerships In the 
community at the 25th 
Annual Meeting, Tuesday, 
October 22 at the Masonic 
Temple on Barracks Street In 
Trenton, from 6:30 to 10 
p.m. 

F. Leigh Gibson and 
Andrew Strauss will be pre- 
sented with the 2002 Presi- 
dent's Award for their sup- 
port of Womanspace as 
volunteers and co-chairs of 
the Campaign for Woman- 



ANOTHER ANGLE 

introduces 
2 New Stylists to Our Design Team... 





Ben 

The former owner of 

Le Meche & Princeton Haircuters. 

He has cut hair in London. Paris. 

Berlin & Stockholm. 

Your Hair Should Have Attitude, 
Not Your Salon! 

Please Call for an Appointment 

Free Perking • 362 Nassau Street • Princeton 

609-924-7733 



Gregory Edwards 

John Freida. NYC. 1 Years 

He made the word creative 

Has worked with the world over 

• Meg Ryan 

• Sarah Jessica Parker 

• Kate Hudson 

• Stephanie Seymore 
Worked with the Duchess of York 

on Morning Show end Larry Krq 

to Fashcn Week with OKNY and 

Gucci trunk Show to megaanes 

hke Bazaar. Vogue 

to Etean Segara n Pans 




CELEBRATING MICHAELMAS: Waldorf School students celebrated the 
Michaelmas Festival on Monday, September 29. Eighth graders dressed up 
as a dragon, moving along the school grounds until finally subdued by St. 
Michael. The annual festival inspires courage, compassion, and the will to 
do good in the children. 



flcprn gCen 

mTn Assisted Livino »yRniDtN(_t_ 

(=} 775 Ml. Lucas Rd, Prim, ton 



Assisted Living should be as 
individual as each person is unique.. 

Discover the Acorn Glen difference! 
Call 609-430-4000 



nospitaJ Keacbes Out to 
Victims of Domestic Abuse 

In observance of National 
Domestic Violence Awareness 
Month, Princeton HealthCare 
System (PHCS) has created a 
partnership with the Toscana 
Fellowship, a Princeton-based 
non-profit organization, to 
raise awareness and preven- 
tion of domestic violence. 

PHCS and the Toscana Fel- 
lowship, an organization that 
educates people about rela- 
tionship violence, will provide 
individuals with a personal 
reference guide that contains 
information such as hotline 
numbers, shelter locations, 
and safety tips. 

The distributed items are 
available in both English and 
Spanish, and all information 
is concealed for the health 
and safety of the individuals 
receiving it. For more infor- 
mation, call 609-497-3300. 



t 



_,_ j The Princeton Institute lor International 
)JJy an< I Regie >nal Studies presents 







The Future of Relations 
between 

Mexico and the U.S. 



Arturo Sarukhan 

( Consul General of Mexico in New York 

Wednesday, October 22, 4:30 p.m 

Dodds Auditorium, Robertson Hall 

Princeton University 



Special Dandelion Store 
To Open on Palmer Square 

Dandelion, a jewelry and 
accessory store, will open at 
47 Palmer Square West on 
October 18. 

The store will be a welcome 
addition to Palmer Square's 
gallery of shops and restau- 
rants, said Palmer Square 
vice president David Newton. 
"Their merchandise will 
attract a broad range of cus- 
tomers that will serve to ben- 
efit not only themselves, but 
all the retailers located in 
their immediate vicinity. Their 
potential in the Princeton 
market is enormous." 



Dandelion will feature je- 
welry by Dillon Rogers, Nomi- 
nation, Jordan Schlanger, 
Druxman, Judith Jack, Chan 
Luu, Mar Mar, and more. In 
addition, the store will carry 
fashionable accessories and 
offer services, such as Bat 
Mitzvah and Birthday regis- 
tries, as well as a Wish List 
program. 

A family-owned business, 
Dandelion was established in 
1969, and has two other 
locations in Pennsylvania. 

Learn about the color 
changes in autumn and take a 
walk through the forest, dis- 
covering and collecting a vari- 
ety of colorful leaves. After- 
wards participants will make 
a fall foliage suncatcher. 




IN CHARGE FOR A DAY: Fourth grader Kelly Byrne 
of Princeton recently enjoyed being Head of the 
Lower School for a day. The day in charge was a 
gift from her parents who bid for the opportunity at 
Stuart's annual fundraising auction last spring. 
Shown is Kelly Byrne, wearing her pajamas, which 
was part of her plan for the day, along with 
extended breaks and a special lunch menu. 



1 



COMPARE PRICE 

ON ANY CAMERA. 

i CALL 609-924-7063 



Any 35mm, Digital, 
APS, or Video Camera 



USED CAMERAS WANTED! 

Trade or Cash 



NEW YORK CAMERA 

173 Nassau St • Princeton • M-F 8:30-6; Sat. 9-5 






TPACERT«TO 

00637 
UC • OA 5298 



EvecarE 

"Dedicated to Quality and Service " 

Presented by Dr. Mary E. Boname 

Optometnc Physician 

CATARACT SURGERY 



The most common type 
of cataract surgery, 
phacoemulsification. 
Involves a small incision 
through the side of the 
cornea. Here, a probe is 
inserted, which breaks 
up the cataract with 
high frquency ultra- 
sound, after which the 
ieces of the clouded 
ens are vacuumed 
away through a small 
tube. Left behind is the 
lens capsule, which can 
accept a replacement 
lens (intraocular lens). 
Made of either silicone 
or acrylic, it is folded to 
fit through the small inci- 
sion made for the pha- 
coemulsification phase 
of the operation. As the 
intraocular lens enters 
the capsule, it unfolds 
and tiny attached plas- 
tic loops hold it in place 
The incision is then 
closed, usually without 
stitches The entire pro- 
cedure takes place in 
less than a half-hour 

V&ouwttsat. 



% 



www.mecnj.com 



Traditional cataract sur- 
ery requires an incision 
at spans a third of the 
circumference of the 
cornea and needs as 
many as eight stitches to 
close. In contrast, the 
phacoemulsification 
technique allows the 
cloudy lens to be 
removed through an 
incision as small as 1/16 
of an inch wide. This 
technique allows many 
patients to experience a 
faster recovery and a 
quicker return to good 
vision. Call MONTGOM- 
ERY EYE CARE at 609-279- 
0005 to arrange an eye 
health exam that 
includes screening for 
cataracts. We are 
located at Montgomery 
Center at 1325 Rt. 206. 
Office hours ate Mon. 
Tues. Thurs. 10-8, Wed 
10-7; Fri 10-6. and Sat 9-3. 



PS. An intraocular lens 
will generally restore a 
cataract patient's vision 
to what it was prior to the 
development of the 
cataract. 



CALENDAR 



Wednesday, October 15 

12:30 to 1 p.m.: Organ 
recital; Princeton University 
Chapel. 

4 p.m.: Book signing by 
celebrity chef, Emeril Lagasse 
at Barnes & Noble in 
Princeton 

7:30 p.m.: Princeton 
Human Services Commission; 
380 Witherspoon Street. 

7:30 p.m.: Talk, "Famine- 
Genocide In Ukraine, 1932- 
1933," by Dr. Taras Hunc- 
zak; Bart Luedeke Student 
Center Theatre, Rider Univer- 
sity, Lawrencevllle. 

7:30 p.m.: Anna in the 
Tropics; Roger S. Berlind 
Theatre. Also Thursday, and 
Friday at 7:30 p.m., Saturday 
at 4 and 8:30 p.m., Sunday 
at 2:30 and 7:30 p.m. 

8 p.m.: Preview perfor- 
mance of Passage Theatre's 
Afghan Women; Mill Hill 
Playhouse, Trenton. Also 
Thursday, Friday and Satur- 
day at 8 p.m., Sunday at 5 
p.m. 

8 p.m.: Wintertime; 
McCarter Theatre. Also 
Thursday and Friday at 8 
p.m., Saturday at 3:30 and 8 
p.m., and Sunday at 2 p.m. 

Thursday, October 16 

12:15 p.m.: Recital, 
Westminster Conservatory at 
Nassau; NUes Chapel, Nassau 
Presbyterian Church. 

1 to 4:30 p.m.: Pneumonia 
and Flu Shots; Suzanne 
Patterson Center, 45 Stock- 
ton Street. 

7 p.m.: Talk, "The Anthrax 
Letters: A Medical Detective 
Story," by Dr. Leonard Cole; 
Princeton University Store. 

7 p.m.: Concert, The Com- 
posers Ensemble at Prince- 
ton; Princeton University 
Chapel. 

7:30 p.m.: McCarter The- 
atre's abridged version of The 
Tempest; New Jersey Per- 
forming Arts Center. Also 
Sunday at 2:30 p.m. 

8 p.m.: The Laramie 
Project; Theatre Intime, 
Hamilton Murray Theater. 
Also Friday at 8 p.m. , Satur- 
day at at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. 

8 p.m.: Passage Theatre's 
Afghan Women; Mill Hill 
Playhouse, Trenton. Also Fri- 
day and Saturday at 8 p.m., 
Sunday at 5 p.m. 

Friday, October 17 

Noon to 2 p.m.: Preview of 
Annual Book Sale; Princeton 
Public Library. 

12:30 p.m.: Gallery Talk, 



"The Flag Painting of Childe 
Hassam"; Princeton Univer- 
sity Art Museum. Also Sun- 
day at 3 p.m. 

2 to 5:30 p.m.: Annual 
Book Sale; Princeton Public 
Library. Also Saturday from 9 
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 
4:30 p.m.: Talk, with Ed 
Moloney, author of The IRA: 
A Secret History; James 
Stewart Theater, 185 Nassau 
Street. 

6 p.m.: Dracula; Kelsey 
Theatre, Mercer County Com- 
munity College. Also Satur- 
day at 2 p.m. and 6 p.m., 
Sunday at 2 p.m. 

8 p.m.: Concert, Princeton 
University Orchestra; Rich- 
ardson Auditorium. 

8 p.m.: Concert, organist 
Diane Blsh; Miller Chapel, 
Princeton Theological 
Seminary. 

8 p.m.: Attacks on the 
Heart; George Street Play- 
house, New Brunswick. 

8 p.m.: Joyful Noise, Off- 
Broadstreet Theatre, 
Hopewell. 

Saturday, October 18 

11 a.m.: Children's Talk, 
"Man's Best Friend"; Prince- 
ton University Art Museum. 

1 to 5 p.m.: Seminar, "Po- 
etry as Social Conscious- 
ness," led by Salvatore A. 
Buttad; Princeton University 
Store. 

Sunday, October 19 

4 p.m.: Princeton Sym- 
phony Orchestra, "Sunday 
Afternoon with Mozart & 
Friends;" Montgomery Center 
for the Arts. 

6 p.m.: Nassau at Six 
Music, church organlsi Janet 
Miller performs Reger, 
Mendelssohn, Bach, and 
Calvin Hampton; Nassau 
Presbyterian Church. 

7 p.m.: Performance and 
discussion of Native American 
flute music; Scheide Hall, 
Princeton Theological 
Seminary. 

Monday, October 20 
Recycling Pickup 

7 p.m.: Talk, "Terence 
Fisher: Horror, Myth and 
Religion," by Paul Leggett; 
Princeton University Store. 

8 p.m.: George Shearing; 
McCarter Theatre. 

Tuesday, October 21 

5:30 p.m.: Meeting, Prince- 
ton Public Library Board of 
Trustees, Library meeting 
room. 

8 p.m.: Vadlm Repln; 
McCarter Theatre. 

Wednesday, October 22 

Noon: Drumthwacket Tour. 
Every Wednesday. Reserva- 



Bring your smile 
to Dr. HuckeL 

A brighter, straighter, more beautiful smile can 

light up your face and your life in the most 

delightful ways. Bring your smile to the Pnnceton 

Center for Dental Aesthetics and discover hi m 

good a really great smile can make you feel. 




A Princeton 
/ \ Center for Dental 



STHETICS 



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at. utttfiMbfisai. ifijitpon 

tlon required: call (609) 
683-0591. 

12.30 to 1 p.m.: Organ 
recital; Princeton University 
Chapel. 

4 p.m.: Lecture and concert 
featuring Beethoven Quar- 
tets, with Prof. Scott Bum- 
ham and Guarnerl String 
Quartet; Taplin Auditorium. 

4:30 p.m.: Talk, with short- 
story writer Nell Freudenberg- 
er, poet Gjertrud Schnacken- 
berg; James Stewart Theater. 
185 Nassau Street. 

7 p.m.: Talk, "Signs of the 
Artist" by Prof. John WUm- 
erding; Princeton University 
Store. 

7:30 p.m.: Township Zon- 
ing Board of Adjustment; 
Township Municipal 
Complex. 

7:30 p.m.: Talk, novelist Paul 
Watkins; Princeton Public 
Library. 

8 p.m.: Wintertime, 
McCarter Theatre. Also 
Thursday and Friday at 8 
p.m., Saturday at 3:30 and 8 
p.m., Sunday at 2 and 7:30 
p.m. 

Thursday, October 23 

8 p.m.: Borough Zoning 
Board of Adjustment; Bor- 
ough Hall. 

8 p.m.: Passage Theatre's 
Afghan Women; Mill Hill 
Playhouse, Trenton. Also Fri- 
day and Saturday at 8 p.m., 
Sunday at 5 p.m. 

8 p.m.: Concert, Guarnerl 
String Quartet; Richardson 
Auditorium. 

Friday, October 24 

12:30 p.m.: Gallery Talk. 
"Kay Sage's / Saw Three 
Cities," Princeton University 
Art Museum. Also Sunday at 
3 p.m. 

7 p.m.: Halloween at the 
YMCA, Princeton Family 
YMCA, Paul Robeson Place. 

7 to 9 p.m.: Art auction 
benefiting Princeton Family 
YMCA; Wllmerdlng Estate. 
Rosedale Road. Call (609) 
497-9622. ext. 210 for 
tickets. 

8 p.m.: Concert, Princeton 
High School Orchestra, 
"Evening with 
Bach. ...Really!"; Princeton 
High School Auditorium. 

8 p.m.: Concert, New Jer- 
sey Symphony Orchestra; 
Richardson Auditorium. 

8 p.m.: Concert, The Com- 
posers Ensemble at Prince- 
ton: Brentano String Quartet; 
Taplin Auditorium. 

Saturday, October 25 

9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.: Mlnl- 
Rummage Sale, Trinity 
Church, 33 Mercer Street. 

10 a.m. to 1 p.m.: Open 
House; McCarter Theatre. 

11 a.m.: Children's Talk, 
"Animals In Art"; Princeton 
University Art Museum. 

2:30 to 4:30 p.m.: 
"Spooky Saturday" Hallow- 
een program; Arts Council of 
Princeton. 102 Witherspoon 
Street. 

7 p.m.: Talk and book sign- 
ing with Edward Tenner, 
author of Our Own Devices; 
Princeton University Store. 

8 p.m.: The Tamburitzans 
of Duquesne University dance 
troupe; Kelsey Theatre, Mer- 
cer County Community Col- 
lege. Also Sunday at 2 p.m. 




Recycling 

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■ ■■— - II ■■ 

PRINCETON ACADEMY GLEANS APPLES: For the fifth consecutive year, the 
entire student body of Princeton Academy engaged in apple gleaning at 
Terhune Orchards. The school participates In this event as part of its 
community service program. Boys in Junior-kindergarten through eighth 
grade picked apples that will be donated by Terhune Orchards to the area 
needy. Shown, from left, are Joseph Gallagher of Princeton Junction and 
Ross Holley of Pennington. 



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"Frontiers of Knowledge" by Prof. 
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S PRINCETON PERSONALITY 



j Historical Society Director Gail Stern Helps Bring Princeton's History to Life 



Gail Stern has not always been pas- 
sionate about history. Early on, art 
was her great love, and an Interest in 
history was not even a glimmer on the 
horizon. 

"Even when I was at Brown, which was in 
Providence, and not far from Boston and all 
that history. I wasn't really that Interested in 
it,' reports Ms. Stem. 



How did such a non-history buff become 
^ director of the Princeton Historical Society, a 
e - position she has held for the past 10 years? 

2 "I think the Interest was probably there. 



o lying just under the surface waiting to be 
5 tapped," she says It just took a little time.' 
a. 



Even In the eighth grade, In fact, she was 
aware of history and Its powerful effect. 

"When I think about growing up in school, 
I think about an upcoming event here at the 
Historical Society on October 16: a panel 
discussion of people's memories of President 
Kennedy's assassination. 

"I vividly remember JFK's assassination," 
continues Ms. Stern. "I was In the eighth 
grade, and Mr. Needham, our teacher, told 
the class. I remember that I Just didn't under- 
stand how it could happen, and that It had a 
very powerful effect." 

Art School 

Bom and brought up In Longport, a suburb 
of Atlantic City, Ms. Stem had a happy child- 
hood with younger brother, Robert and sis- 
ter, Laurie. Her parents, Herb and Faith 
Stem encouraged Gall's Interest In art. 

"I liked to draw, and I especially enjoyed 
art In school, but I had other interests too," 
says Ms. Stem. "I loved the beach, especially 
in the fall when the crowds left. We loved 
growing up near Atlantic City. 



"It was also great to go to the Boardwalk 
and go on the amusement rides. I loved the 
Steel Pier and seeing all the big performers 
there, like Paul Anka and Frankle Avalon. 
livery year, we'd go to the Miss America 
Pageant parade. When I was older, though, 
thJl Itfcame passe — we felt we became Just 
too sophisticated for if!" 

Ms Stem also enjoyed English and French 
at Atlantic City High School, and was active 
In the Student Council and her sorority. Fri- 
day night movies were a regular outing with 
her friends. 



Attending Brown University In 1968, In the 
midst of a turbulent time In American soci- 
ety, Ms. Stem was caught up In the flow of 
events, and In particular, opposition to the 
Vietnam War. 

"I was active In the anti-war movement," 
she explains. "We had a student strike at 
Brown, and 1 stenciled the anti-war T-shirts. 1 
was an activist." 

Academic Experimentation 

It was also a time of academic experimen- 
tation at Brown, and students were given 
wide latitude In choice of studies. 

"I made up a combined major — art, 
archaeology, and anthropology." recalls Ms. 
Stem. "I named It art and society, and took 
all the courses I liked, but not things that 



now I wish I had taken, like politics. 
economics, and history. 



"1 especially enjoyed my art class 
with guest professor Edward Koren. 
a cartoonist," she continues. "It was 
very exciting to be in a class with 
him." 

Also while at college, she worked 
In Brown's Haffenreffer Museum of 
Anthropology. "This really turned 
me on to museums." she notes, 
"and Jim Deetz, Professor of historic 
American archaeology, really got me 
started In this profession. 



History was becoming more than a 
glimmer on the horizon now, and 
her interest piqued. Ms. Stem went 
for a master's degree In American 
civilization at the University of Penn- 
sylvania in 1972. 

"This was a multi-disciplinary 
approach to American society, link- 
ing history, art, and literature," she 
explains. "Looking at history 
society through different facets. 




"The Historical Society of Prince- 
ton (HSP) is a museum and library 
dedicated to interpreting the history 
of Princeton, New Jersey, with 
community support and involve- 
ment. Its activities are inspired by 
the past with the goal of informing 
the future... In all its endeavors, 
HSP continues to be committed to 
a broad and inclusive representa- 
tion of Princeton, to fostering col- 
laborative partnership, and to 
strengthening the community." 

So it was a good fit from the 
start, reports Ms. Stem. 



and 



was 



Archaeological Dig 

"\ enjoyed It very much. It 
hands-on, too. We had an archaeo- 
logical dig at Valley Forge and found Revolu- 
tionary War buttons and bullets and bones of 
pigs and chickens." 

Ms. Stem also found that she liked Phila- 
delphia, and remained there for her first job, 
cataloging the 18th Century and 19th Cen- 
tury American glass collection at the Phila- 
delphia Museum of Art. 



PRESENTING HISTORY: "I feel very good about my 
work here. I've been able to work with some wonder- 
ful board members, staff, and people in the communi- 
ty." Gail Stern, director of the Historical Society of 
Princeton, is shown in front of a section of the Soci- 
ety's current exhibition, "Lost Princeton", encompass- 
ing a variety of entities considered lost to the commu- 
nity. Photos and artifacts relating to former buildings, 
businesses, schools, industries, transportation, 
schools, farms, etc., are on display. 



"I loved It!" she says enthusiastically. "I've 
always had the right kind of work. I have 
been very blessed to work In my field the 
past 30 years." 

After three years at the Philadelphia 
Museum of Art, she moved on to become 
Field Study Coordinator at Temple Universi- 
ty, placing students and Interns In Philadel- 
phia area museums. This was followed by a 
stint as associate director of the Pennsylvania 
Humanities Council, where she oversaw 
grant programs to museums, schools, univer- 
sities, and other non-profits. 



After five years In Jobs emphasizing admin- 
istrative work, Ms. Stem longed for more 
hands-on responsibilities. "I felt 1 had to get 
my hands on some objects and Into a 
museum setting," she explains. 

So, In 1974, she accepted a position as 
curator of the Balch Institute for Ethnic Stud- 
ies, a multi-cultural library and museum In 
Philadelphia. 

Very Powerful 

"It was very Interesting," she recalls. "We 
did exhibitions on stereotyping, using 
objects, photos, and documents relevant to 
ethnic groups In the U.S. Our exhibitions 
traveled nationally. In this series of exhibi- 
tions, we Included as many groups as possi- 
ble and put It In as broad a context as possi- 
ble. It was fascinating, very graphic, and very 
powerful. It got people's attention, and then 
educated them about discrimination." 



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Ms. Stem stayed at the Institute until 
1993, serving as museum director for nine 
years. 



Through this succession of positions relat- 
ing to art, archaeology, and history, Ms. 
Stem was becoming more and more aware 
of the Importance of presenting history 
through the means of exhibits, and also of 
the need to emphasize local history. 

"People need to know about history in 
order to understand their own lives and to 
help them determine their future," she 
explains. "It is very Important to Instill an 
Interest In history through our exhibitions. 
That Is my philosophy, if a child comes In 
and sees his grandfather or cousin In a pho- 
to, he will relate to It. It personalizes It for 
them." 



"For one thing, I really could see 
the difference between a historical 
society like ours and a museum. I 
began to see that a historical soci- 
ety is a group of people interested 
In history. I began to see how 
important people are to the organi- 
zation, and I began to see how 
important local history Is. Every- 
thing stems from local history. It's 
people's lives, their stories. Prince- 
ton Revolutionary War History Is a 
big factor here, of course, but we 

often do exhibits on more recent 

history as well." 

In fact, the first exhibition presented during 
Ms. Stem's directorship — which had actu- 
ally been planned prior to her arrival — was 
focused on Princeton's Italian-American com- 
munity. The first exhibition under her stew- 
ardship was on Albert Einstein, who spent 
the latter part of his life In Princeton. 



The opportunity to head north to Princeton 
and serve as director of the Historical Soci- 
ety of Princeton became available in 1993, 
and Ms. Stem looked forward to the move. 

"I liked the Idea of being In Princeton," she 
says. "It's a lovely place to live and work. 
The University setting appealed to me, and 
Princeton is a stimulating place because of 
the availability of so many opportunities — 
concerts, lectures, events — and because the 
people are so bright." 

Definite Ideas 

In addition, Ms. Stem had definite Ideas 
about the Historical Society's future 
direction. 

"I said at the time that I would be most 
Interested, If I came to the Society, in broad- 
ening Its scope and reaching out to the com- 
munity; doing programs and exhibits with 
segments of the community that had not par- 
ticipated before. The board said that was 
exactly what they wanted." 



The Historical Society features one exhibit 
a year in its historic Balnbridge House head- 
quarters, a pre-Revolutlonary War structure, 
dating to 1766. 

Memorable exhibits for Ms. Stem Include 
the Italian-American collection, 250 years of 
Princeton Jewish history, and Princeton's 
African-American community. 

Great Asset 

Long-time Princeton resident Fannie Floyp 
worked on the African-American exhibit with 
Ms. Stem, helping to gather memorabilia 
from churches and the neighborhood, and 
arranging Interviews. She Is an admirer of 
Ms. Stem's ability to focus on what is Impor- 
tant and to bring everything together. 

"Gail Stem has been a great asset to the 
Historical Society of Princeton, especially 
regarding her continuous Interest emphasiz- 
ing the diversity In Princeton's history and 
Inclusiveness of all people. Gail Is just a great 
person. She is very fair, tries so hard, and is 
a wonderful representative of the Historical 
Society." 



As the Society's mission Statement notes: 



Nick Camevale, who worked with Ms. 
Stern on the Italian-American exhibition, 
agrees, adding, "I have found Gail to be 
extremely persistent and very deliberate. She 
constantly examines things thoroughly and 
sticks with it until the job Is completed. I 
have seen these traits not only in her work at 
the Historical Society, but also at the Rotary 
Club, where she is extremely participative. 

Continued on Next Paoe 



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Gail Stern 

Continued from Preceding Page 

"She has done all these 
things during difficult times 
for the Historical Society 
(with funding problems due to 
cutbacks from the state), and 
she has been very success- 
ful." 






In fact, Ms. Stem wears 
many hats as Historical Soci- 
ety director. Responsibilities 
include financial work, fund- 
raising, meeting with groups 
and organizations and with 
the Society's board of 
trustees. 

"The work requires a lot of 
different skills, and you are 
always using your hands, 
eyes, and brain," she points 
out. "You have to have an 
eye for many things. You 
have to manipulate things 
and envision how it all fits 
together. 

Tangible and Intangible 

"Ideas for exhibits come 
from the program committee 
of the board, and we all dis- 
cuss it," she adds. "It's very 
expensive and time- 
consuming to mount an 
exhibit. Some items we have 
on hand, others are donated. 
We are always trying to get 
more 20th century material." 

The rewards are substan- 
tial, however. Both tangible 
and intangible: tangible in 
seeing the exhibit come to 
life; intangible in the myriad 
of ways visitors are affected 
by what they see, and its ram- 
ifications in their lives. 



Lawrence Selver, who is now 
in his eighties. He has helped 
me In so many ways in deal- 
ing with people and in raising 
funds for non-profits." 

The Historical Society's 
next exhibit, slated for spring 
of 2004, will be based on the 
"Princeton Recollector," adds 
Ms. Stem. "It will have great 
subjects and wonderful arti- 
cles on Princeton from the 
18th through the 20th 
centuries." 

Important Gift 

In addition, the Society was 
recently the beneficiary of a 
very important gift from the 
Institute for Advanced Study. 
Some 65 pieces of late Victo- 
rian furniture belonging to 
Albert Einstein when he lived 
at 112 Mercer Street have 
been given to the Society. 

"This Is an honor," says 
Ms. Stem. "It could have 
been given to the Smithso- 
nian or any museum, but they 
wanted to keep it in Prince- 
ton. We will use It very 
responsibly to Interpret his 
life. Our hope is eventually to 
have an Einstein room on 
permanent display." 



Importance of and need for 
understanding among groups 
and individuals. Something 
she has emphasized through- 
out her career. 



"Most museum people like 

,to see something finished," 

ft notes Ms. Stern. "So much in 

our lives Is unfinished. We 

Illke to see a tangible result of 
what we are working on, and 
the same thing in a book, 
When we publish our journal." 
She says she is very grate- 
ful for the support of so many 
who help to make the dreams 
of the Historical Society a 

{reality. 
"The board members and 
•staff have helped me so 
much. I've learned from 
them, and many have become 
friends. f also have a mentor, 



When not involved in the 
challenges of historical explo- 
ration, Ms. Stem covers a lot 
of ground investigating flea 
markets and garage sales. 
"For fun and relaxation," she 
points out, "and I also read 
mysteries to relax, especially 
Tony HUlerman and Diane 
Davidson. 

"I love to travel, and I have 
visited different parts of the 
world," she continues. "A 
favorite place is Thailand — it 
is so beautiful. Of places I 
haven't been, I especially 
want to see Greece and Scan- 
dinavia. My 14-year-old son 
Jonathan and I are also very 
excited about a cruise my 
brother has arranged to the 
Caribbean next month." 



History Is never very far 
from her mind, however, 
whether she is traveling or at 
her office In Balnbrldge 
House. 

In particular, by means of 
the exhibits at the Historical 
Society, Ms. Stem always 
seeks to demonstrate the 



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"I have been trying to fight 
discrimination as much as 
possible and further toler- 
ance," she explains. "There 
are always so many different 
factors, so many perspec- 
tives. We want to educate 
people and promote toler- 
ance, and history can be such 
an Important way to achieve 
this." 

—Jean Stratton 



Princeton YWCA to Host 
2003 Race for the Cure 

The Breast Cancer Re- 
source Center (BCRC) of the 
YWCA Princeton will host the 
10th Annual Susan G. 
Komen Breast Cancer Foun- 
dation New Jersey Race for 
the Cure on Sunday, October 
19. The race will be held at 
Bristol-Myers Squibb on 
Route 206 in Princeton. 

The Komen Race for the 
Cure Series is the largest 
series of 5K fitness runs/ 
walks in the world. It is the 



largest foot race and the lar- 
gest event to benefit women's 
health in New Jersey. Over 
the past nine years, the series 
has raised over $5 million for 
breast cancer research and 
services for the medically 
underserved. Twenty-five per- 
cent of the net proceeds go 
toward the program's fun- 
ding, and 75 percent goes 
toward helping fund breast 
cancer diagnostics, treatment, 
awareness, and educational 
programs. This year's goal is 
to raise over $1.3 million. 

This year's event will also l 
Include prizes, merchandise, 
food, and live music. Chil- 
dren's activities Include 
clowns, face painting. Jug- 
glers, and more. 

An average of one in eight 
women In the U.S. develop 
breast cancer, and It Is the 
leading cause of cancer death 
In women ages 40-59. Along 
with the Race for the Cure, 
the BCRC helps educate 
women and men on breast 
cancer, and spreads the mes- 
sage encouraging early detec- 
tion of the disease. 



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• Vented & Unvented Gas Logs 





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»m«5S, 



3303 ROUTE 1 SOUTH 

lAcrmt from Qiukrr Bridge M*ll 
Neil frer SUndiruj Building S of Pirr I) 

Lawrenceville. NJ 
(609) 951-8585 



VILLAGE OF NEWTOWN 

SHOPPING CTR 

2844 S. Eagle Rd Newtown. PA 

(Bet. Genuardi's & West Coast Video) 

(215)579-2022 



HOURS M0N THROUGH fRI 1000800. SAT 1 0:00-7 00 & SUN I00O-S0O 



EAST GATE SQUARE II 

11 19 Nixon Drive 

(Across from Home Depot) 

Moorestown. NJ 

(856) 866- 1300 
www.patioworid.com 



Volunteers Needed 
For Park Clean Up 

On Sunday, October 19, 
from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., 
Friends of Princeton Open 
Space needs help to cleanup 
walking trails around Moun- 
tain Lakes Park and along the 
Delaware and Raritan Canal. 
Participants will start from 
Mountain Lakes House or the 
Port Mercer parking lot on 
the Canal, depending on their 
preference. The Canal Park 
cleanup will work its way 
northeast to Turning Basin 
Park on Alexander Road. 
Those who come to Mountain 
Lakes House will work on 
several tr.iil segments in the 
area, depending on the num- 
ber of people available. 

Volunteer! should bring 
work gloves and w»-,ir shoes 
le for wet areas. 
Clippers would also be useful, 
.is would weed whacks If the 
operator Is familiar with their 
safe operation. Refreshments 



will be offered afterward at 
Mountain Lakes House. For 
additional information call 
921-2772. 



Watershed Hosts Talk 
On Aspects of Environment 
On October 16 from 7-9 
p.m., the Stony Brook- 
Millstone Watershed is offer- 
ing a program for adults and 
teens called The Spirit and 
Nature Care for the Earth and 
the Evolution of Religion". 

Rev. Fletcher Harper, an 
Episcopal priest and Execu- 
tive Director of Partners for 
Environmental Quality will 
speak about the spiritual 
aspect* of environmental pro- 
tection, resources within 
world religions that support 
an ethic of environmental 
care, challenges that the envi- 
ronmental crisis poses for 
religious traditions worldwide, 
and the opportunities for spir- 
Itual growth that a relation- 



ship with the natural world 
provides. 

The cost of the program is 
$5 for Watershed members 
and $7 for nonmembers. Pre- 
registration is required. To 
register or for additional 
information call 737-7592. 



Realtor Sponsors Auction 
To Benefit Princeton YMCA 

The Princeton office of Wei- 
del Realtors is sponsoring an 
.,i)< non of fine art and collec- 
tibles on Friday, October 24 
from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Wil- 
merding Estate on Rosedale 
Road. All proceeds from the 
event will be dedicated to re- 
novating the playground at 
the Princeton YMCA. The 
proceeds of the auction will 
aid the YMCA's in light of Its 
loss of a $50,000 state grant. 

The auction, managed by 
Ross Galleries in New York, 
will Include original oils and 
watercolors, limited edition 



Stone Lectures at Princeton Theological Seminary 



Christian History and the Kingdom of God: 

Rescuing Our Memories and Discerning 
Some Temptations of Our Time 

October 20-23 

The Reverend Dr. Kwame Bediako 

Akrofi-Christaller Memorial Centre 
Akrophong, Ghana 




Leetuivl 

Monday, October 20, 7:00 p.m. 

UoturtU 

Tuesday, October 21, 1:15 p.m. 

All lectures will be held in the Main Lounge 
In the Mnckny Campus Centor. For more 
Information, cell 609-497-7760. 



Lecture III 

Tuesday, October 21, 7:00 p.m. 

Lecture IV 

Wednesday, October 22, 7:00 p.m. 

Lecture V 

Thursday, October 23, 1:15 p.m. 



H Prin ceton 
Theological wwwptMm.edu 

Seminary 




People to complete surveys 



Earn $50.00 cash and get feedback 
on your job-related strengths 



(all: 

Caliper Research Department at 

609-524-1445 




ALL WORK AND SOME PLAY: Weidel Realtors is sponsoring an auction of 
fine art and collectibles to support the Princeton YMCA, which recently 
lost a $50,000 state grant. Pictured at far left are Candie VanderWilt and 
Richard Smith of the Princeton Family YMCA, and Judy Moriarty, seated 
center, of Weidel Realtors. Also pictured in the top row from left are Weidel 
Associates Edwin Taylor, Sue Ann and Daniel Snyder and bottom row from 
left next to Mr. Smith are Mergelie Moodley, Barbara Dressier, Mary Ann 
Ryker, Louis Rouleau, Jessica Ornstein, Cindy Goldsmith, Priscilla Waring, 
Donald Moore of Princeton Mortgage, Judy Brickman, Linda Feldstein, 
Rebecca Larsen, Abby Weidel, and Rashmi Bhanot. 



scrigraphs, lithographs and 
etchings, sculpture and art 
glass. Authentic autographed 
sports memorabilia and 
estate jewelry will also be 
offered. Hors d'oeuvres, 
wines and dessert will be 
served. 

Tickets are $35 per person 
and $50 per couple. For 
more information and ticket 
purchasing, call (609) 497- 
9622, ext 210. 



includes breakfast and lunch. 
For further information or to 
make a reservation, call 
586-9446. 



Women in Business 
Workshop October 23 

Women who are starting or 
expanding a small business 
are invited to a one day work- 
shop called, "Women In Busl- 
ness: Powerhouse 
Strategies". 

The conference will be held 
on October 23 from 8:30-3 
p.m. at the Mercer County 
Community College confer- 
ence center. The event is a 
cooperative effort between 
the College of New Jersey's 
Business Development Center 
and the New Jersey Associa- 
tion of Women Business 
Owners. 

The workshop will focus on 
strategies that help build a 
leading edge completive busi- 
ness. Professionals In their 
fields will give presentation 
on topics such as the effective 
use of web sites, choosing a 
legal form of business, busi- 
ness law, using financial 
statements, converting a 
prospect to a sale, and find- 
ing hidden markets. 

Presenters will Include 
Sarah E. Miller, president of 
Set Now Solutions, Lynn 
Blessing MDougal, an attor- 
ney, Sherise D. Rltter, CPA 
with Mount Ritter Group and 
Arnold Rlntzler of Mid Atlan- 
tic Development. 

The workshop fee of $125 



Church Thrift Sale 
Helps Charities 

The United Methodist 
Women of Princeton will hold 
their fall thrift sale on Thurs- 
day, October 16 from 5 to 8 
p.m., Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 
p.m., and Saturday, from 9 
a.m. to 1 p.m. at the United 
Methodist Church located on 
the corner of Nassau Street 
and Vandeventer Avenue. 

Items for sale include clo- 
thing, shoes. Jewelry, acces- 
sories, housewares, light fur- 
niture, books, CDs, electro- 
nics, and linens. All items are 
in excellent condition. Satur- 
day will be bag sale day when 
a shopping bag full of items 
will cost $3. 

All proceeds from the sale 
will go to charitable organiza- 
tions such as Crisis Ministry, 
Trenton Soup Kitchen, Tren- 
ton Rescue Mission, Girl 
Scouting Beyond Bars, 
United Methodist Committee 
on Relief, United Methodist 
Homes, and Appalachia Ser- 
vice Project. 



Public Invited to Walk 
For Diabetes Awareness 

The University Medical 
Center at Princeton, presen- 
ting sponsor of America's 
Walk for Diabetes, invites 
members of the community to 
join them in the Princeton 
walk. The event, a six-mile 
stroll around Princeton, is 
designed to increase local 
awareness of the American 
Diabetes Association while 
raising funds that are used in 
the fight to find a cure for 
diabetes. 

The University Medical 
Center's walking team will be 
led by team captain Paulina 
Duker and supported by 
employees, volunteers and 
friends of Princeton Health- 
Care System. The walk 'will 
be held on Sunday, October 
19 at 10 a.m., rain or shine, 
and will start at Princeton 
University's Observatory. 
Anyone who would like to 
walk with the team 0£ make a 
donation is encouraged to 
visit www.diabetes.org/walk 
or call 497-4372. 



IS YOUR PLUMBING cranky & 
out ol dale'' Plumbers who advertise 
in TOWN TOPICS never are 



Senior Care Management 

A Private Agency 

for Home Care and Care Management 

Ewing 737-8398 




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Watch "Community Corner" — the talk show featuring people from around here. Sunday - Friday 
at 9 pm. Exclusively on Patriot 8. the local TV channel of Patriot Media cable customers. 

For more information, log on to www.patmedia.net. 



MUSIC REVIEW 



Rarely Heard Light French Music Is Presented 
In an Engaging, Entertaining, and Skillful Manner 



Halloween is coming soon, and the 
Richardson Chamber Players have 
wasted no time getting into the 
mood by exploiting early 20th century 
French musical humor. Apparently, Erik 
Satie had very strong opinions about audi- 
ence behavior during performances, and at 
one time issued explicit instructions on 
audience decorum during the performance 
of his music. As part of their Sunday after- 
noon concert in Richardson Auditorium, 
the Chamber Players took these instruc- 
tions one step further by printing in the 
program a roadmap of clapping behavior, 
further emphasizing the humor which 
underscored the music performed. Demi- 
Sec, itself a play-on-words reference to 
champagne, was dedicated to the music of 
Satie and his devoted follower, Francis Pou- 
lenc. Like an a la carte menu at a fine 
French restaurant, this concert offered a 
variety of excellence, some small and light 
and some substantial. 

For this performance, the Richardson 
Chamber Players pulled from its pool of 
fine musicians nine fine instrumentalists 
and one singer, conducted in the ensemble 
pieces by Richard Tang Yuk. The Chamber 
Players pulled its first "fast one" of the 
afternoon in the opening piece by having 
two instrumentalists walk on to one side of 
the stage, when the opening work was actu- 
ally to be played by a pianist on the other 
side of the stage at another piano. The first 
half of the concert was constructed with 
two major Poulenc chamber works, inter- 
spersed with short piano pieces by Satie, as 
if to clear the musical palette. Satie was 
once characterized by Debussy as a "fine 
medieval musician who wandered into the 
20th century," and the clarity with which 
pianist Margaret Kampmeier played the 
three short Satie works in the first half 
clearly elucidated the simplicity of Satle's 
music. Ms. Kampmeier's keyboard style 
was precise, with the music punctuated well 
when necessary. 

Francis Poulenc was part of a group of 
six French composers in the early 20th cen- 
tury who were devoted to keeping the musi- 
cal philosophies of Satie alive. Sonate pour 
Hautbois et Piano, performed by pianist 
Elizabeth Dl Felice and oboist Matthew Sul- 
livan, paid homage to Satie's lyricism and 
clarity, yet was permeated with the French 
cabaret and nightclub character so preva- 
lent at the time Poulenc was writing. Mr. 
Sullivan's program biography includes ref- 
erences to playing in Broadway pit 



orchestras, and this experienced served 
him well as his playing transported the 
audience back to the Paris of the early 
20th century, with its smoky club atmo- 
sphere. As usual, Ms. Di Felices playing 
was exact and precise, timed perfectly with 
the oboe's nuances. 

Baritone Thomas Meglioranza joined Ms. 
Dl Felice and Mr. Sullivan, as well as cor- 
netist Brian McWhorter, bassoonist Brian 
Kershner, clarinetist Evan Spritzer, cellist 
Sophie Shao, violinist Sunghae Anna Lim 
and percussionist Tom Kolor for Poulenc s 
secular Cantata La Ball Masqu6. The 
poetry set in this cantata is farcical and it 
was stylishly presented by Mr. Meglioranza, 
although the audience's full appreciation of 
the text was hampered by not having a 
translation. The humorous and light 
orchestration, incorporating saucy jazz ele- 
ments and unusual percussion instruments, 
was also reminiscent of a Parisian setting, 
and Mr. Tang Yuk cleanly kept the instru- 
mentalists together and on track In a good 
flow, as the work ended in a French carni- 
val style. The oboe and clarinet played 
extremely well together, and effective con- 
trast was found between the lowest notes 
of the piano and the upper register of the 
violin. Overshadowed at times by the 
ensemble, Mr. Meglioranza was a bit easier 
to hear in the later movements, with lighter 
and less forceful orchestration. 

Ms. Di Felice again showed the 
exquislteness of her playing in 
Poulencs Novelette M in C 
Major, which opened the second half of the 
concert much as Masterpiece Theater's 
fireside opening set the stage. Mr. Sullivan 
and Mr. Kershner contrasted this work with 
the jarring but precisely played Sonate 
Pour Clarinette et Basson. Most Impres- 
sive between these two players was the 
coordination of their phrase and movement 
cadences. The other most Impressive pair- 
ing of players was the two-piano rendition 
of Satie's La Belle Excentrique, in which 
part of the humor of the piece was In 
watching Ms. Dl Felice and Ms. Kampmeier 
successfully tangle loglstically in the 
crossed hands between players. 

Like a fine French meal, Sunday after- 
noon's concert was concise: just the right 
amount was served with time to linger in 
between. This music Is rarely heard, and 
the refined playing of the Richardson 
Chamber Players created an entertaining 
and engaging afternoon. 

—Nancy Plum 



Oct 7, 8, 14 & 15 at 8pm, Nov. 9 at 2pm 
$10 ad ults, $8 seniors/students/children 

Mercer County Community College 

West Windsor, \ I 



Km Call (609) 584-9444 




PRINCETON 
BALLET SCHOOL 

Classes in ballet, modern, 

jazz & Spanish dance. 

609-921-7758 






M 



irU Mastrosltn 

Directed Dy Jonatluui Bernstein * 

PREVIEWS: 

Thurs Oct 9 thru Sun Oct 12 
Tickets: $20 

PERFORMANCES: 

Thurs Oct 16 thru Sun Nov 2 
Tickets: $25 



fc*v^c*vi 




Call about discount prices for 
students, seniors and group*. 




SHOWTIMES: 

Thurs, Fri, Sat at 8pm • Sun at 5pi^ 

For tickets, call 

609-392-0766 

or visit our website at 
www.passagetheatre.org 



Performances take place at the historic 
Mill Hill Playhouse at the intersection of 
Front & Montgomery Streets in Trenton 



7A 



FREE, SECURE PARKING is available 
across the street from the theatre. 




jyy c;;Jij:' 




ffcift 



ARTS 



=* Fleet 
£hc forties 



Organ Concert Planned 
At Princeton Seminary 

Concert and recording art- 
ist Diane Blsh will present the 
Joe R. Engle Organ Concert 
at Princeton Theological 
Seminarys Miller Chapel on 
Friday. October 17 at 8 p.m. 

She received the National 
Citation from the National 
Federation of Music Clubs of 
America in 1989. the first 
organist to receive the award. 
The Boston Globe called her 
playing 'virtuoslc and solidly 
musical." 

She will perform a program 
of organ favorites, traditional 
classics, and some of her own 
hymn arrangements. 

The concert is free. Howev- 
er, admission tickets are 
required as seating is limited. 
For a free admission ticket or 
information, call (609) 
497-7890. 



L 7 M-W-TH-MO-6 
/ MS 12-8 

HAIR CUTTERS SA ™ 

lO Moore Street • 608-924-6696 



?o7 * 



ICHARDSON 

U D I T O R I U M 

IN ALEXANDER HALL 



October 17 & 18, 2003 
8:00 pm 

University On hestra 

n rfa by S\ 

nckOlS S I . >n. SS Sludents 

For ticket information and ■> Ml schedule ol owns, ph^se visit the R*ha«dv>n 
Auditorium mb U ll www pi inc«lon •du/nchaud I a i dl (609) 2S8S000 
htaMoMU 

* 



the Pennington Difference 



a 
> 
■< 

O 
n 

— 
o 





THE PENNINGTON SCHOOL 

When Stuilftm ami Jiachtn Partner i» turning 

Coeducational day and boarding lor grades 6-12 
1 1? Wesl Delaware Avenue. Penninglon, NJ 08S34 
wvvwpennlngtonwg* 609-737-6128 



Come meet our faculty team. A team committed 
to making ■> difference In the lives of our 
students every day 

Grades 6-8 Open House - 
Sunday November 2nd, 2pm 

Grades 9-12 Open House - 
Sunday November 9th, 2pm 



"The MoWmi' 



Bra 

Symphony No.4 
in E Minor 

Grieg 

Piano Concerto 
in A Minor 

Ffflico Kuan '04, Piano 



8 p.m. 

Friday 

\ rl7 

Saturday 

October 18 



David Arrivee 

Guest Conductor 



•rftaoMtaa M* »Tlni»tn — CiWin 



%f> J*m T«m «« TiaXwi f iMi (U«» ■■* •»» C*» v» Timton OtfiUrm* 
it *« Umt- Cow** 0«c« o* Cm*** •*««»• 



University 
Orchestra 



Tlek.t. tit. $S »tud.nt» 

(Tl(«r P»*» kc*»M) 
Box Olllc. (SO*) 2SS-S000 




BACH ENTHUSIASTS: Robert Loughran, director of the Princeton High 
School Orchestra it rehearsing for a family concert titled, "An Evening with 
Bach. ..Really!" The performance it tcheduled for Friday, October 24 at 8 
p.m., in the Princeton High School Auditorium. Tickets are $5 and can be 
purchated by calling the high school's orchettra office at 806-4280. Ticket 
talet will help fund the orchestra's April, 2004 performance tour of 
Switzerland. 



Concert Is Scheduled 
At Shopping Center 

Guy Mendilow will perform 
Friday, October 24 at Ten 
Thousand Villages at the 
Princeton Shopping Center, 
beginning at 6 p.m. 

Featuring voice, guitar, ber- 
Imbau, and percussion, Guy 
Mendllow's performances 
draw on an extensive vocabu- 
lary, from Brazilian and 
Israeli to Hindustani, folk and 
blues. 

Some of the music to be 
performed Is recorded on his 
album, Soar Away Home. 
Copies of the album will be 
sold at the concert. 



SCHOOL BAND 

RENTALS 



flute ■ sax • trombone 

• clarinet • trumpet • violin 

609-897-0032 L t O O w IM O 
PRINCETON JCT 609-924-8282 609-448-7170 609-387-9631 
Loton. Only PRINCETON HIGHTSTOWN BURLINGTON 



Princeton University 

Space Extravaganza 2003 

Presented By The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and 
The Princeton American Society of Mechanical Engineers Student Section 

"The Future of Humans in Space" 

Captain LeeMorin, USAF 
NASA Astronaut 
Thursday, ( tetober 16 

3:30 pm, Vricmi Center 101 
Social to follow - J223 E-Quad 





"50 Years of Space Exploration" 

vel avery 
Directoi Solar ami Interplanetary Exploration, NASA 
Friday, October 17 

omputer Science 104 ' 

Social to Fo Quad 





Theological Seminary 
To Hold Music Event 

Princeton Theological Sem- 
inary will hold a performance 
and discussion entitled. "Mu- 
sic and Healing: A Native 
American Perspective" in the 
Gambrell Room in Scheide 
Hall at 7 p.m. on Sunday, 
October 19. 

The performance will 
include Native American flute 
music by internationally- 
known flute player, Gary 
Stroustos, and Paul Thomp- 
son, a Navajo flute maker and 
performer. The presentation 
and discussion will focus on 
Native American perspectives 
of spirituality, music and 
healing. Mr. Stroustos and 
Mr. Thompson will be joined 
by Dr. Doug Ziedonis, profes- 
sor of psychiatry at Robert 
Wood Johnson Medical Cen- 
ter. He is also a frequent lec- 
turer at the Seminary. 

The event is co-sponsored 
by Princeton Seminary and 
UMDNJ Robert Wood 
Johnson Medical School's 
Division of Addiction Psychia- 
try. The event is free and 
open to the public. For more 
Information, call (609) 
497-7890. 



Youth Symphony Orchestra 
and taught Music Theory at 
Northwestern University. 
Before moving to Chicago, he 
received a bachelors degree 
from Princeton University, 
where he played clarinet in 
the University Orchestra and 
served as assistant conductor. 

Featured soloist Felice 
Kuan, is pursuing a degree in 
mathematics from Princeton 
University and a certificate in 
Piano Performance. She is a 
graduate of the Juilliard 
School Pre-College Program. 

Tickets for the performance 
are $15, students $5. Tickets 
may be purchased in person 
or by calling the Richardson 
Auditorium Box Office at 
(609) 258-5000. 



on Sunday, November 2 at 3 
p.m. GPYO consists of 21 
young musicians from the 
Princeton area. 

GPYO, conducted by Mae- 
stro Fernando Raucci, will 
perform four orchestral 
pieces for string chamber 
orchestra, featuring George 
Philipp Telemann's Suite in 
A Minor for Chamber 
Orchestra and Flute. Melissa 
Cavagnaro-Wong of Belle 
Mead will perform on solo 
flute. 

Tickets to the show are 
$15 for general admission 
and $10 for seniors and stu- 
dents. For advance ticket pur- 
chase and for more informa- 
tion on upcoming concerts, 
call (609) 936-8700. 



Youth Orchestra to Hold 

Church Chamber Series 

The Greater Princeton 
Youth Orchestra (GPYO) will 
perform at the St. Charles 
Borromeo Church in Skillman 



Micawber Books 

new, used and rare 

110-114 Nassau Street 

Princeton, New Jersey 

(609)921-8454 

Mon-Sat 9-8; Sun 11-5 




Nelson Glass & Aluminum Co. 

Mirrors installed in your frame 

45 Spring St •Downtown Princeton • 924-2880 



University Orchestra 
Opens Concert Season 

The Princeton University 
Orchestra, under the direc- 
tion of guest conductor David 
Arrivee, will open its 2003- 
04 season with concerts on 
Friday, October 17 and Sat- 
urday, October 18, at 8 p.m. 
in Richardson Auditorium on 
the University campus. 

For his program, Mr. 
Arrivee has chosen Bedrich 
Smetana's The Moldau, the 
second tone poem from the 
series, My Country, the 
Piano Concerto in A minor by 
Edvard Grieg and Johannes 
Brahms' last symphony, No. 
4 in E minor. The soloist for 
the Grieg will be Felice Kuan, 
the co-winner of the 2003 
University Concerto 
Competition. 

David Arrivee Is the guest 
conductor for the Princeton 
University Orchestra while 
Conductor Michael Pratt is on 
sabbatical leave. Mr. Arrivee 
has worked with a variety of 
ensembles as conductor, pia- 
nist, and clarinetist. In Chica- 
go, he served as assistant 
conductor of the Chicago 



Princeton 
day school 

A coeducational junior kiiulergiineu - twelfth grade day school 



Open Houses 



Junior Kindergarten - Fourth Grade 

Wednesday, November 5 • 8:30 a.m. 

Guided tours 8:30 - 9:15 ] ajn. 

Classroom visits ami an informational session to follow. 

Fifth - Twelfth Grade 

Sunday, November 9 # 2:00 p.m. 
Guided tours 2:00 - 2:30pm. 
Presentation/ sample classes to follow. 

609-924-6700, Ext. 234 

The Great Road, Princeton, NJ 

www.pds.org 

Princeton Day School does oof discriminate on the basis of race, 
religion or gender, and is an equal opportunity employer 




Trm 



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THEATER REVIEW 



"The Laramie Project" Examines a Troubled Town in Crisis; 
Theatrical Mosaic Portrays the Murder of Matthew Shepard 



m m TjeW horizons 

MONTESSORI 

Programs for Children: 18 months-Kindergc^e- 

■GrxJwgoteo eoftcrwnenf program ova*ab»« oVrrg the Kftool y«or 

We oner rte«©t* tchecfcjet inoer eip«nenc«d Monieuon cerMea teoctwi 



On October 6, 1998, Matthew Shepard, an openly 
gay 21 -year-old University of Wyoming student, was 
kidnapped from a Laramie bar by two men about 
his age, severely beaten, robbed, taken to a remote area 
outside of town, tied to a fence and abandoned. He was 
found the next day in critical condition. He died in the 
hospital several days later. 

Over the ensuing year and a half. New York playwright 
and director Moises Kaufman, 
along with the actors and 
writers who comprise his Tec- 
tonic Theater Project, visited 
Laramie six times and con- 
ducted more than 200 inter- 
views. Those interviews — 
transcribed, edited and 
shaped by Mr. Kaufman, head 
writer Leigh Fondakowskl and 
others — became The 
Laramie Project, a remarkably 
gripping and earnest work of fk 
journalistic theater that 
opened in Denver in 2000 
and subsequently moved to 

the Union Square Theatre in VOICES FROM LARAMIE 
New York for 




housewives, police detectives, friends and family of Matthew 
Shepard and of the criminals, and dozens of others. The 
Laramie Project portrays how ordinary people are affected 
by extraordinary events. It tells a story and seeks to under- 
stand the meaning of that story. Many of the play's Issues 
— of gay rights and homophobia, of community responsibili- 
ty, violence and class — have, due in part to the death of 
Matthew Shepard, become critical Issues in our national 

dialogue over the past five 
years. 

Mr. Jacobs-Jenkins has 
directed with intelligence and 
a deft sense of pacing. The 
actors are well rehearsed. 
The scenes, or "moments," 
flow swiftly, with the assis- 
tance of Scot Grzenczyk's 
functional lighting design. 
The members of Mr. Jacobs- 
Jenkins" company vividly cre- 
ate a fascinating panorama 
of characters. 

Charif Shanahan, stem and 

focused with sharp, clean-cut 

of features, delivers a moving 



— The ensemble cast 



run. 



a successful Moises Kaufman's The Laramie Project, a documen- portrait of a middle-aged gay 
tary drama about the 1998 murder of Matthew Shep- resident of Laramie watching 
Theatre Intime's undergrad- ard, portrays more than sixty different characters, the homecoming parade that 
uate troupe has embraced the Front row (L to R): Jon Ryan, Scott Elmegreen, Artem turns Into a huge rally of sup- 
challenges of this rich and dis- pyatakov. Back row (L to R): Maura Cody, Alexis P°rt for Matthew Shepard. 
turbing ensemble piece, and, Schulman, Charif Shanahan, Aliza Kennerly, Amy Mr. Shanahan then, In the 
under the direction of sopho- Widdowson, Sherry Rujikarn, Ben Cholok. The most stirring moment of the 
more Branden Jacobs- Laramie Project runs through October 18 at the evenln 9. transforms into Mat- 
Jenkins, has mounted a wor- Hamilton Murray Theater on the Princeton University thcw Shepards father In the 
thy production that runs ca mpus. courtroom, directly address- 



through next Saturday at the 

Hamilton Murray Theater on the Princeton University 

campus. 

.In its directness, its voices of ordinary people, its minimal 
staging. The Laramie Project is reminiscent of Thornton 
Wilders 1938 classic Our Town. But in its ^^^^^— 
focus on a crisis and its vast scope in pro- 
viding so many diverse perspectives, it 
more resembles the documentary drama 
tour de force of Anna Deavere Smith's 
Fires in the Mirror (1992) on the clashes 
between Jewish and African-American resi- 
dents of Crown Heights, Brooklyn, or her 
Twilight (1993), which portrays a multi- 
tude of perspectives on the disturbances in 
Los Angeles surrounding the Rodney King »— «^^^^^™ 
verdict. 

Despite its fragmentary structure — with more than 50 
different scenes (called "moments" here) and more than 60 
different characters played by the ten members of the lntlme 
ensemble with little support from set, props or costumes, 
The Laramie Project tells its story and depicts the world of 
Laramie, Wyoming, with striking clarity and engaging theat- 
rical flow. From the opening scene to the final glimpse of 
"the sparkling lights of Laramie" two and a quarter hours 
later, the drama sustains its emotional and intellectual hold, 
taking its audience through the gamut of sorrow, despair, 
shame, anger, and bewilderment, but not without moments 
of humor, sympathy and hope. 

In its efforts to provide, as the local Catholic priest urges, 
a "correct" representation of Laramie, the play maintains an 
objective journalistic approach, letting the voices of Laramie 
speak for themselves. The Laramie Project certainly con- 
fronts the horror of the events of October 1998, but It also 
offers at least the hint of transcendent compassion, love and 
meaning in the death of Matthew Shepard. its consequences 
and the atonement of a whole town, perhaps a whole 
society. 

Through the voices of bartenders, limousine drivers, pro- 
fessors, ministers, actors, surgeons, college students, 



The Laramie Project runs 
through October 18 at the 
Hamilton Murray Theater on 
the Princeton University cam- 
pus. Call (609) 258-1742 or 
visit www.theatreintime.org 
for further information. 



ing one of the murderers: 

"You robbed me of something very precious and I will never 
forgive you for that. Mr. McKlnney, I give you life In the 
memory of one who no longer lives. May you have a long 
life and may you thank Matthew every day for it." 
^ • Jon Ryan provides several high energy, 
good-natured characterizations and a touch 
of levity, especially as a limousine driver 
who had taken Shepard to a gay bar and as 
the bartender at the Fireside Bar. the l<»si 
place Shepard was seen in public on the 
night of October 6. Aliza Kennerly is thor- 
oughly clear and convincing as a longtime 
local resident, a lesbian professor and an 
actor/interviewer and a reporter, among 
■■■■■■^^^^^ other figures. Sherry Rujikarn grows as the 
evening progresses, taking on powerful roles as a Muslim 
university student who has lived most of her life In Laramie 
("These are people trying to distance themselves from this 
crime. And we need to own this crime. Everyone needs to 
own It. We are like this."), then as the policewoman, the first 
officer to arrive at the scene of the crime. 

lexis Schulman delivers a down-to-earth, thoroughly 
credible portrayal as Shepard's best friend, then as a 
lesbian turned activist by the events surrounding the 
murder, while Ben Cholok does first-rate character work In a 
wide variety of roles as the chief Investigating detective, the 
university president and the Tectonic Theater project leader 
Moises Kaufman. Scott Elmegreen presents moving mono- 
logues in the poignant roles of a theater major whose par- 
ents refuse to support him when he plays the part ol <i gay 
character in a production of Angels In America, then the 
young man on a bicycle who first comes upon Matthew 
Shepards beaten body, then as Shepards academic adviftOi 
describing the promising young man and his aspirations. 

Maura Cody Is strong as the University of Wyoming the 
ater professor and as the middle-aged Laramie resident and 
mother of the policewoman who responded to the 911 call 
and worried about contracting HIV. Artem Pyatakov and 
Amy Widdowson round out the cast — less consistently 

Continued on Noxl Page 



oincer 

A 




The 2004 
Lionel R. Driscoll Merit 

L Program | 

The Pennington School is offering two four-year day tuition 
scholarships! Any student currently in eighth grade and not 
presently attending The Pennington School is eligible. 

Test Date & Times : Saturday, Nov 1st, 10am or 2pm 
Stainton Hall (on School campus) 

Call the Admissions Office at 609.737.6151 by October 27th 
a I« test reservation and additional information Spaces an- 1 



%% 



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I HI PENNI • SCHOOl 

When Sfvtsiiti u,td W.m farmer in i/iminr 

11 2 West DrtftAort Avenue. 

femmgton. mj 08S34 • wwwpennington.org 

the Ptnvgion School n m coKJocatorai day and 
boarding school tor yafles f 



THE 

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PRINCETON JCT. 



Montgomery l'r>>u^Monal Center 59Cranbury Road 

>nki VS mile from train station 

609-252-9696 609-275-8666 

WWW NHMonkssori.org 
Member, American Monl 



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^h Princeton^ * 
] String Quartet 

Serenades All Joyous Events 
Holiday Parties & Weddings 

classical music ~ waltzes - rags ~ show tunes 
Also solo piano - trios - duets 

609-683-1112 

visit our website at www.princet0nstrin9quartet.com 



W com ing 

McCARTER SOOl 



t .11*111 CINTII 




PETER CINCOTTI 

Pianisi and incotti 

has taken New York by storm, 

\ sophomore -it ' olumbia 

1 niversity, now on l. a 

absen c to promoti his sell titled 

album, he movi s 1 ffortlessl) from 

innovative ian to deepl) mo> ing 

ballads tot ontemporai \ pop to his own 01 [gin - 

much like his mentor, 1 larrj ( onnii 
Friday, December 1 9 - 8 pm 
Saturday, December 20 - 7:30 pm & 10 pm 
Berllnd Theatre 

GEORGE SHEARING QUINTET 

Grammy Award-winning iau mastei George Shearing 
eai ned intei national recognition as one of th< greati \\ pianisi 
composers of his generation Mosl often associated with his 
innovative, on hestrated fas sound the 'Sharing Sound" 
ln's still making masterful musk al age 8 ( 

Monday, October 20 - 8 pm ^gjjj^g^ 

VADIM REPIN, violin 
Alexander Korsantia, piano 

Program will indude works b) Mozart, Pr 

and R Strai 

Tuesday, October 21 - 8 pm 

BACH PIANO CONCERTO 
FESTIVAL, Part II 
with PETER SERKIN and the Brandenburg 
Ensemble, Jaime Laredo, conductor 

and violin 

i he program will ini lude thi Piano I ona rtot "■■■ ; . ' i &6, 
plus the ( ona no in A foi I lute, \ xolin i ■ Keyboard 
Tuesday, October 28 - 8 pm 

DRUMMERS OF WEST AFRICA 

Renowned nol only in ih 

: .mI hui .in mn. I the world 

1 1, i . I i in. i ml. i ion 

on hestra" combines powerful tra 
. iiihni.il African rhythms with 
instrumental ti i hniques foi a 
. . i.ii, hearl pounding evening of 
miiM. and i" ctacli HHJi 

Tuesday, November 4 - 8 pm A n» cm* #wnt 



HERBIE HANCOCK 

QUARTET 

An icon "i contemporary jazz, this virtu- 
oso pianisi has recorded sui h i lassi< hits 
Vaterm Ion Man and 
< hameleon (from Headhunts I, and 

( iinti'lupc I hind. Winner of l > Grammya 

(and .in ' Iscai tor Round Malm 
Wednesday, November 5 - 8 pm 





91 University Place, Princeton, NJ 
Tickets: 609-258-ARTS (2787) 

^J Order online at www.mccarter.org 

Tt» pragiMn * in*J» pouM m p«rt 6v '«*!• hen »• •*»• J«f»«» &■•• 
Ou*<4<*\V)»An*ft*QWntr*<*SU** m P««1n«« Kgftr, Ol It* MMml 




I OFF TO SEE THE WIZARD: The Belle Mead Ballet Company will be perfomv 
F ing an adaptation of "The Wizard of Oz" on Friday, October 17 at Hillsbor- 
ough High School and Saturday, October 25 at Orchard Hill Elementary. 



Theater Review 

Continued from Preceding Page 

convincing in their character 
stretches, but with some 
memorable moments 
nonetheless. 

Mr. Jacobs-Jenkins stages 
the myriad scenes of this play 
as simply and straightfor- 
wardly as possible, with the 
actors often just sitting or 
standing downstage facing 
the audience. The simplicity 
is appropriate and effective, 
given the nature of the mate- 
rial and the disjointed journal- 
istic style of the text, but a bit 
more staging, using an occa- 
sional prop, furniture item, 
more of the upstage area or 
one or two more costume 
pieces, would have been help- 
ful in contributing texture, 
color and perhaps even more 
clarity to the proceedings. 
There were moments when 
the downstage actors caused 
sightlines problems, obscur- 




Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics, University of Oxford; Francis and Helen 
Pentz Visiting Professor of Physics and Mathematics, Pennsylvania State University 



FASHION, FAITH, AND FANTASY IN 
THE NEW PHYSICS OF THE UNIVERSE 

While experiment, observation, and precise reasoning drive 
scientific knowledge, subjective and social elements also 
play significant roles in its development. Three lectures titled 
"Fashion," "Faith," and "Fantasy" present the importance of such 
elements in current approaches to understanding the universe. 



FASHION F day 



October 17, 2003 

8 p.m. McCosh 50 



FAITH Monday 



October 20, 2003 

8 p.m. Richardson Auditorium 



FANTASY Wednesday 



October 22, 2003 

4:30 p.m. McCosh 10 



LOUIS CLARK VAN 






2003 04 PRINCETON UNIVERSITY PUBLIC LECTURES SERIES 



Ing upstage actors who were 
speaking. 

None of these minor mat- 
ters, however, nor the maca- 
bre set design by Rebecca 
Simson and Edwin Davisson 
— consisting of dark passage- 
ways filled with chains, 
barbed wire, pipes and other 
metallic configurations lead- 
ing to the downstage area — 
detract significantly from the 
overall power and poignancy 
of this moving production. 

Mr. Kaufman's play pro- 
vides an astonishing glimpse 



of a particular place at a par- 
ticularly critical time in its his- 
tory, but as he points out, 
and the dynamic Intime 
troupe affirms, this work is 
"not only about where 
Laramie was at the end of the 
millennium, but wheTe we are 
as a country — not only in 
relationship to homosexuali- 
ty, but in relationship to 
class, economics and educa- 
tion — all the fault lines in 
our society." 

— Donald Gilpin 



Recitals • Voice • Piano • Choral • Orjjan,* Christmas 
Concerts •-Chamher Music • Opera • Children's Concerts 
• And Much More • L 

This season, come see* 7 
what the neighbors are up to. 



WESTMINSTER CHOIR COLLEGE 
OF RIDER UNIVERSITY 



24-hour concert information: 609-219-2001 / Box office: 
609-921-2663 x308 / On the Web: westminster.rider.edu 




THURSDAY 
NOVEMBER 6. 2003 
8:00 P.M. 

RICHARDSON 

AUDITORIUM 

In ALEXANDER HALL 

Princeton University 

609.258.5000 



THE ESCHER TRIO 

of AMSTERDAM 

Haydn: Piano Trio In C Major. Hob.XV:27 
Korngold: Piano Trio In D Major. Opus I 
Schubert Piano Trio In E-flat Major. D.929 

Tickets: $33. $26. $20 
Students. $2 

PRINCETON 

UNIVERSITY CONCERTS 2003-2004 




SPECIAL 4-CONCERT PACKAGE 



NOVEMBER 9, 2003 FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE 
Yuri Mazurfcavkh, violin 

Ka bd levsk y Over tu re to Colas Breugnon 
Shostakovich Violin Concerto 
Piokoftev Symphony No. 7 




JANUARY 18.2004 



▲A 



TAKE LE METRO TO NASSAU STREET 
Peter Odrckhtvtkyy, accordion 

Schumann Overture to Hermann and Dorothea 
Ibert Dtvertmement 
Koprowskl Accordion Concerto 
Bach Toccata and fugue In D Minor 
PcHjknc Smfontetta 




MARCH 14. 2004 QUENCH YOUR THIRST 

Raiko Uchida. piano 
Heinlchen Concerto in Ma/or 
Mozart Piano Concerto No 17 In 6 Major 
Beethoven Symphony Na 7 



APRIL 25. 2004 LOVE FROM A DISTANCE 
Vtadam* OvcMnnakov. piano 
Saint-Saens Overture to La Princeaiaune 
Rachmannofl Piano Concerto Na 2 
Dvorak Symphony No 9 'Prom the New WorkT 



A-OOtKERT PAC KACfc Sl*f $ 1 1 6. $*7. $40 
SINCU TKKETV %J*r>lS $26. $1 2 
A»y i <i i— n «aa wjt p t x a> &amq* 




FOR TlTKFT^ i'AI 



rcijSP/aOjmj 



Princeton Symphony OrckeUra Phone: 16091 497-0020 
RO. ■«■}*• Fax: 1609) 497-0904 

PrtncatoivHI 04.S42 arww prvicetontymphorry.org 



mowotn 

CMuprurraA 



' 



"Joyful Noise" Planned 
At Theatre in Hopewell 

Joyful Noise, a play based 
on the politics and scandals 
behind the creation of Han- 
del's oratorio. The Messiah, 
will open October 17 at the 
Off-Broadstreet Theatre in 
Hopewell for a six-weekend 
run. 

Out of favor with the pub- 
lic, and depending on the 
mercy of the King to pay his 



debts. Handel reluctantly 
agrees to set Charles Jenn- 
ens* libretto to music. A pow- 
erful Bishop tries to stop 
Handel and his efforts, 
declaring scripture should 
come only from the pulpit. 

The Bishop's devious 
efforts to turn the King 
against Handel almost get the 
theatre closed before the 
piece can be heard. Handel's 
business manager and a 
music patron attempt to moti- 
vate Handel and try to keep 



Martin Blackman 

LANDSCAPING 



Princeton, NJ 



609-683-4013 



order during this turbulent 
time. 

The show Is directed by 
Off-Broadstreet Artistic Direc- 
tor Robert Thick with cos- 
tumes by Patricia A. Hibbert. 

It runs weekends from 
October 17 through Novem- 
ber 22. On Friday and Satur- 
day, doors open at 7 p.m. for 
dessert, with curtain at 8. 
Sunday matinees feature des- 
sert at 1:30 p.m. with curtain 
at 2:30. Admission Friday 
and Sunday is $22.50; Satur- 
day, $24. There is a senior 
citizen discount for Sunday 
matinees. 

For reservations, call the 
theatre at (609) 466-2766. 



• 25 years of thoughtful, knowledgeable 
landscape design executed with cane 

• Best-quality, low-maintenance deer 
resistant plantings 

• Terraces and walks 

FREE CONSULTATION 



COSMOBLEU 

SALON 


You are invited 
to join 

CosmoBleu 

in 


170 Nassau Street 
Princeton 


celebrating 

their new home 

in Princeton 


609.497.2538 


with a man's or 
woman's haircut, 


^^^^^ 


you will receive 
FREE 


. 


8oz. Shampoo 



McCarter Troupe Sets 
A Puppet Presentation 

McCarter Theatre Center's 
Education Department will 
present Its abridged version 
of Shakespeare's stormy mas- 
terpiece The Tempest at the 
New Jersey Performing Arts 
Center (NJPAC) for two per- 
formances on Thursday, 
October 16 at 7:30 p.m. and 
Sunday. October 19 at 2:30 
p.m. 

This theatrical offering by 
McCarter's Education Depart- 
ment, reinterpreted for family 
audiences, comes complete 
with life-sized puppets and a 
variety of magical theatrical 
effects. 

This Is being presented as 
part of NJPAC's Other Stages 
Festival, a unique program of 
staged readings, family per- 
formances and New Jersey 
premieres, sponsored by 




The Joe R. Engle Organ Concert 
featuring Diane Bishy organist 



with the Cantate Domino Choir 
Martin Tel, director 

Friday, October 17 
8:00 p.m. 
Miller Chapel 

B Princeton 
Theological 

Seminary 

Limited seating; tickets required. 

For a free ticket, call the Chapel Office at 609-497-7890. 

7& 









K^ 



Joseph R. Pucciacti, Artistic Director 

15th Anniversary Season 

PRESENTS * 

Bizet's 

Exotic... Passionate... Untamable... 

CARMEN 

Friday, October 24- 8 pm 
Sunday, October 26 '3 pm 



Patriots Theater at the War Memorial - Trenton, New Jersey 



Pre-Curtain Talks • English Supertitles 
Opening Night Pre-Opera Spanish-Style Buffet 

Come and see why audiences keep returning 
to the Capital Region's savvy opera company! 



Fsttf tor Befcam Opts HI proyv* s 
nttt pots** m pri by U Hw J«>*y SM» 
CoK*aaffaMrt*ttf ^m^ 
SUeiPwvAgnycft* JOSkX g£ 
lttttri&tio*av« torts Aft rtKO S? 



for tickets & information, call 609-S81-7200 

Pncei:S62.$Si,$4$.$40.$2> 
Vna, MauerCard & Amex Accepted 



BALLERINA COOPERATIVE: Suzanne Farrell, brought her company to the 
Princeton Ballet School for a week of classes and rehearsals in preparation 
for their recent performance at McCarter Theatre. Standing left to right are 
Suzanne Farrell, Shannon Parsley, Vanessa Woods, Jordan Moses, Emily 
Byme, Samantha Gullace, Casey Thome, and Meghan Campbell. Seated are 
Jenna Simon, Laura Fuchs and Ashley Wegmann. 



NJPAC and the New Jersey 
Theater Alliance, the consor- 
tium of professional, not-for- 
profit theaters In New Jersey. 
Tickets are $26. To order 
tickets by phone, call the 
NJPAC Box Office at (888) 
466-5722 or visit 
www.njpac.org. 



N.C. JEFFERSON 

Plumbing & Heating 

• Commercial 

• Residential 

• Free Estimates 

190 Wltherspoon Street 
924-3624 

State License Number 7084 




2003-2004 Season 

atTrinaton 



Fri., Oct. 24 — 8 pm 

The 

Composers Ensemble 

nt Princeton 

presents 

The Brentano 
String Quartet 

with 

Kojiro Umczaki 

shakuhachi 

Ted Coffey 

ceramic tube & vocals 

New Works by: 

Betsey Biggs GS 
Ted Coffey GS 
Prof. Dan Trucman 
Prof. Dmitri Tymoczko 



Taplin Auditorium 
in Fine Hall 
Princeton University 
Free Admission • 258-4239 



OPENS THIS WEEK! 



Too many people, too madly in love. 
A mischievous new comedy about 
warm hearts and cold feet. 



By Charles L. Mee 
Directed by David Schweizer 

Now Through November 2 



"Wacky, elegant 

and amazingly 

buoyant." 

— Variety 





C*rm*n Nicholas Martha Danny Lola 

d*Lavallad* Hormann Mason MaaCrogwrgw Pashalirtsai 



l«F 

McCARTER 

THIATH CtMTU 



Adult comedic situations 

(609) 258-ARTS (2787) 

91 University Place 
Princeton, NJ 

^/ Order online at www.mccarter.org 



4 



This program it mad* potsiofo in pari by funds from in* 
Ntow J*r**y Stato Counol on tn* ArtfD*p*rtm*/7t of Stat*, 
a Partner Ag*ncy of th« NabonaJ Endowment for th* Arts 
and by fund* from th* National Endowment for th* Arts 



m 



40 YEARS 

AND GOING STRONG. 

COME M i 

mi MEW STUART. 



www stiwt V\l nj u» 



1 .11 fol 



- " f. tammriarrt \ 




Martyn Wyndham-Read 

Musk From Australia 
Will Be Heard Here 

Folk singer Martyn 
Wyndham-Rcad will present a 
program of music from Aus- 
tralia and the British Isles at 




8:15 p.m. Friday. October 
17. at Christ Congregation 
Church. 50 Walnut Lane. His 
performance is sponsored by 
the Princeton Folk Music 
Society. 

He is considered by some 
to be the finest living inter- 
preter of Australian folk song. 
English by birth, he first 
developed his great interest in 
folk songs of the outback 
when he went to Australia in 
the early 1960s. 

During his subsequent trav- 
els he spent much of his time 
seeking out and learning old 
songs directly from drovers, 
cane cutters, and other bush 
workers. 

He performs throughout 
the United States. Great Brit- 
ain, and Australia, and has 
been presenting an annual 
workshop series in France. 
The London Daily Mail wrote 
that he is "the best thing to 
come out of Australia since 
tinned peaches." 

Admission is $15, $10 for 
members of the Folk Music 
Society and affiliated organi- 
zations. $3 for children age 
11 and under, and special 
rates for students. 

The next event in the Folk 
Music Society's concert series 
will be a performance by Gor- 
don Bok on November 21. 




BLOODY GOOD SHOW: Damien Daeta, of Hightstown, is featured as Hacker 
in "Dracula," continuing at MCCC's Kelsey Theatre October 17 through 19. 
He Is surrounded, from left, by Dracula's vixens, Kaitlyn Seitz of Yardville, 
Stephanie Lynn of Wrightstown, and Jackie Robinson of West Windsor. 



r 



open house 

sm., October 25 • 10 am - noon 



Co'op Optional 

\ and 4\i(n-dlil elatiti • Minn • Foreign /.miKuugo 

For more information call: (609) 924-9521 
Montgoiru rj We Rock) Hill. NJ 08553 




-Woodwinds 



partners in ecology... 



4492 U.S. Rt. 27. Princeton 



L 609-_924-3500J 




H fiorlion of Die color proceeds mill be 

donaifj hji gour participating culorest to 

the iSnrnerican Cancer Society. Silso. 

as a special thank i/ou, each participant 

will receive a lircast Cancer CPin. 



Color jor the Cause! 

Clo help fight breast cancer) 
October, Chelsea Crimpers will be coloring for the cause... Jiave one of 
yjl6JA£ trained colorest design a special color effect using one of our 
\, including derni color, fashion color, or a special highlighting technique. 

Chelsea Crimpers 

Salon of U^rinceton 

14 Spring Street • Princeton • 60g-g24-l824 

L'OREAL 

I i t 



salon 



UJ 

-J 



Svante 




UJ 



Director, Department of Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig 



Genomic Approaches 
to Human Origins 

Wednesday 
October 15, 2003 
8:00 p.m. 

McCosh 50 



The study of DNA sequence differences within and between species has opened 
new inroads to understanding the history of humans as a species. What have 
studies of genetic variation among humans and between humans and our extinct 
relative, the Neanderthal, told us about human population history? We now 
know more about the evolution of a gene responsible for articulate language in 
humans. While the DNA sequences of humans and chimpanzees differ only slightly, 
activity levels of a sizable proportion of genes differ between them. Does racial 
"classification" of humans have any genetic validity? 




\t\ * truft tkfim. 



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Bordentown 254 Route 130-Route 206 609-298-4050 

East Windsor H 5 Route 1 30 North 609-448-9110 

Ewing Township I860 North Olden Ave 609-882-9220 

Remington 304 Route 202-31 Circle 908-782-2500 

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CINEMA REVIEW 



"The Housekeeper 



39 



A Melancholy Melodrama From Claude Berri 



Claude Berri has enjoyed an enviable fifty-yea'' 
career in French cinema, initially as an actor, 
but later adding writing, producing, and direct- 
ing to his repertoire. The venerable Oscar-winneT (for 
Le Poulet) is probably best known for his captivating 
adaptations of Jean de Florette (1986), and its sequel, 
Manon of the Spring (1987). These French film clas- 
sics were based on Marcel Pagnol's passion plays about 
a bitter, gen- 
eration-spanning r ^ | 
feud over water ™ 
rights fought 
between two family 
patriarchs, one a 
greedy peasant 
farmer (Yves 
Montand) from 
Provence, the oth- 
er, his transplant- 
ed, cosmopolitan 
neighbor (Gerard 
Depardieu), an Ide- 
alistic hunchback 
who Inherited an 
adjoining tract of 
land. MAID IN PARIS: Jacques (Jeanne-Pierre Bacri) and 

The Housekeep- (Emilie Dequenne) share an exuberant intimate moment. 
er, Berrl's latest 

offering, is a relatively civil affair, a mid-life crisis melo- 
drama based on Une Femme de Menage, a novel by 
Christian Oster. The alternately tender and tawdry tale 
trades in such stock themes associated with the genre 
as coupling, betrayal, uncoupling, and confession. The 
action Is all set against familiar French backdrops fea- 
turing characters seemingly steam-pressing their chests 
with cigarette smoke while conversing at an outdoor 
cafe or quaffing carafes of wine at a table with a bowl 
of fruit as a pedestrian passes carrying a shopping bag 
with a bare baguette sticking out. 

Superficially, the storyline reads a little like Lost in 
Translation, where Bill Murray plays a jaded married 
man who has a revivifying romantic romp in Japan with 
an attractive younger woman. Here, at the point of 
departure, we find Jacques (Jeanne-Pierre Bacri), a self- 
pitying, fifty-plus Parisian, abandoned by his wife, 




Constance (Catherine Breillat), and living alone for six 
months in an increasingly messy flat. 

This depressed classical music engineer barely manages 
to muster up the energy to drag himself to work at his 
studio daily. Since he obviously needs help with the piles of 
dirty clothes and dishes growing in his home, he answers 
an advertisement he spots on a bulletin board from a 
woman looking for employment as a housekeeper. 

He hires the attrac- 
tive tweny-year-old 
Laura (Emilie 
Dequenne) even 
though she quickly 
confesses that she 
has no experience. 
Something seduc- 
tively irresistible 
about this carefree 
girl Ignites a spark 
inside the soul of this 
lonely man. Despite 
their distinctly differ- 
ent tastes in music 
and other things, the 
staid Jacques allows 
Laura ^ e desperate bohe- 
mian to move in 
because her boyfriend 
has broken up with her. 

ot surprisingly, the odd couple soon ends up shar- 
ing a bed and a May-November romance blossoms. 
This set-up is simply the tip of the eventual iceberg 
of complications which ensue, given Laura's wandering 
eye, prodigal wife Constance's return after second 
thoughts, and the revelations waiting to be uncovered when 
the couple takes an extended holiday at Jacques' best 
friend's seaside home in scenic Brittany. 

Congratulations to the sage Monseiur Berri, ever the 
meticulous master, for somehow crafting a grimly intro- 
spective, yet undeniably light, mood piece onto a prepos- 
terous sounding premise that would spell disaster in the 
hands of almost any other writer/director. The Housekeep- 
er works, whether taken as an absurdist, escapist fantasy, 
a realistic relationship, or a little of both. 

Excellent {irkitVz). Rated R for sexuality, female frontal 
nudity, and brief profanity. — Kam Williams 



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160 Nassau St • 609-683-7595 



VERONICA GUERIN 

Friday, October 17: 5:00, 7:15. 9:30 

Saturday & Sunday, October 18 & 19: 

12:45.2:45, 5:00.7:15.9:30 

Mon -Thurs: Oct. 20-23: 6:45, 9:15 



(R) 
1:38 



LOST IN TRANSLATION 



Friday, October 17: 5:15, 7:30, 9:45 

Saturday & Sunday, October 18 & 19: 

12:45. 3:00. 5:15.7:30. 9:45 

Mon -Thurs: Oct. 20-23: 6:45. 9:15 



(PG-13) 
1:42 




Casa de Los Babys (R for expletives and drug usage). John Sayles directs this 
drama about a half dozen women who venture from the ITS. to Latin America to adopt 
babies only to learn after their arrival that they cannot live according to local law. In 
English and Spanish with subtitles. 

Cold Creek Manor (R for violence, expletives and sex). Dennis Quaid and Sharon 
Stone share top billing in this thriller about a family that moves to the country only to 
discover that their dream house is haunted by horrifying secrets hidden by the recently- 
paroled previous owneT. 

Duplex (PG-13 for sex, violence and profanity). A Danny DeVlto directed crime 
comedy about a couple (Drew Barrymore and Ben Stiller) who move into the perfect 
N.Y.C. apartment and are told they can buy it once the little old lady (Eileen Essell) 
living upstairs moves out. The overly eager pair decide to eliminate the wait by simply 
killing her. 

Good Bovf (PG for crude humor). A sci-fi kiddie comedy starring Saturday Night Live 
alums Moflie Shannon and Kevin Nealon as the parents of the little boy who unknow- 
ingly adopts a dog from a planet called Sirius sent to hatch a canine plot to take over 

The Housekeeper (Unrated). Erotic escapist melodrama directed by Claude Berrl 
(Jean de Florette) about a lonely, fiftyish classical music engineer who falls for the 
inept, twenty-year-old housekeeper he hires to clean the mess that has accumulated 
since his wife left him. In French with subtitles. 

House of the Dead (R for nudity, profanity and pervasive gore). Halloween season 
horror flick based on the Sega video game features typical teen scream scenario. 
Coeds, who are drawn to an island off Florida for a techno rave party, find themselves 
in a high attrition situation when attacked by an army of ancient zombies who had 
failed to find the fabled fountain of youth there hundreds of years before. 

Intolerable Cruelty (PG-13 for slight sex content, profanity and brief violence). Zany 
revenge comedy, courtesy of the Coen Brothers, about a ruthless divorce lawyer 
(George Clooneyj who finds himself seduced by a satisfied client's (Edward Herrmann) 
vengeful ex-wife (Catherine Zeta-Jones). Big name cast includes Cedric the Entertainer, 
Billy Bob Thornton and Geoffrey Rush. 

Kill Bill: Volume 1 (NR). Uma Thurman stars in this Ouentin Tarantino crime thriller 
about a woman almost murdered at her own wedding who comes out of a coma after 
five years to embark on a bloody rampage against her would be assassins. Live 
action/animation mix with David Carradine, Vivrica A. Fox, Daryl Hannah, Samuel L. 
Jackson, and Lucy Liu. 

Lost in Translation (R for sex content). Drama about an over-the-hlll movie star (Bill 
Murray), in Tokyo to tape a TV commercial, who befriends a bored housewife (Scarlett 
Johansson) neglected by her workaholic husband. 

The Magdalene Sisters (R for cruelty, violence, nudity, sex and expletives). Fiction- 
alized account of true events, set in Ireland in 1964. about four wayward young women 
committed to a convent of sadistic nuns who strip them of their individuality by forcing 
them to work for free in a laundry seven days a week. 

Mystic River (R for profanity and violence). Clint Eastwood directed this labyrinthine 
whodunit starring Sean Penn as a man whose daughter has been murdered. Kevin 
Bacon and Laurence Fishburne co-star as the detectives handling the Investigation, and 
Tim Robbins surfaces as the prime suspect. 

Out of Time (PG-13 for sex, expletives and brief profanity). Denzel Washington as a 
compromised cop with his reputation on the line after he steals some evidence money 
to pay for his married girlfriend's operation only to get implicated In her arson-related 
murder. 

Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl (PG-13 for action/ 
adventure violence). Disney kiddle fright flick based on Its amusement park ride of the 
same name. 17th Century adventure stars Johnny Depp as a dapper outiaw who teams 
up with the young daughter of a governor to thwart the plan oy a band of zombie 
buccaneers to undo the curse that has left them lingering In the Umbo of the undead. 

Runaway Jury (PG-13 for violence, language and adult themes). Adaptation of the 
John Grisnam page-turner starring John Cusack as a mysterious man who manipulates 
his way onto a jury as foreman. Rachel Welsz co-stars as the girlfriend go-between 
willing to deliver the verdict in the multi-million dollar case to the higher bidder. With 
Dustin Hoffman, Gene Hackman and Jennifer Beals. 

The Rundown (PG-13 for violence and crude dialogue). The Rock stars In this action 
adventure as a brash bounty hunter venturing into the jungles of the Amazon to bring 
back an escaped con (Seann William Scott). 

The School of Rock (PG-13 for crude humor and drug references). Dark comedy 
with Jack Black as a down-and-out rock musician who starts substitute teaching at a 
posh prep school where he inspires his students to find their inner Hendrix. 

Secondhand Lions (PG for adult themes, mild epithets and violence). Heartwarming 
tale, set in the 60s, with Haley Joel Osment as a timid teen, forced to spend the 
summer in Texas with his rich, reluctant Uncles Hub and Garth (Robert Duvall and 
Michael Caine. respectively), who learns a lot more about their mysterious past and a 
big lesson In lite in the process. 

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (R for gratuitous gore, profanity and drug use). 
Remake of the 1974 slasher flick based on the true tale ot cannibal Ed Gem. the 
Wisconsin serial killer whose sick exploits also inspired Psycho and Silence of the 
Lambs. In this version, five joyriding kids, including Jessica Blel (of TV's 7th Heaven), 
have the misfortune of crossing the path of the gas-powered madman. 

Thirteen (R for teen drug use, teen sex, suicidal tendencies and profanity). Autobio- 
graphical offering written "by and starring 14-year-old Nickl Reed as a good California 
girl gone down a wanton path of sex, drugs, alcohol, piercings, and reckless 
materialism. 

Under the Tuscan Sun (PG-13 for sex and expletives). Romantic comedy, loosely 
based on Frances Mayes' 1966 memoir, stars Diane Lane as a 35-year-old American 
lawyer who escapes her cheating husband by vacationing in Italy where she impulsively 
buys a fixer-upper and gets involved with a tall, dark andhandsome stranger. 

Veronica Guerin (R for violence, expletives and drug content). Tragic factual biopic 
recounts the life of an Irish journalist (played by Cate Blanchett) who was assassinated 
after writing an expose on the drug trade in Dublin. A remake of when the Sky tails, 
which starred Joan Allen as the Ill-fated reporter. 

Whale Rider (PG-13 for profanity and a drug reference). Maori fable set In New 
Zealand, based on the Wltf Ihlmaera novel of the same name about a 12-year-old 
orphan who wants to be the first female chief of a patrilineal tribe. Spunky, women s 
libber proves her worth by harnessing a humpback for a heck of a Nantucket 

S,ei9h - rl(,e - -Kam William. 



Current Cinema 

Titles and times subject to change, call theater. 

PRINCETON GARDEN THEATRE, (609) 683-7595 

160 Nassau Street 
Friday. October 17 — Thursday, October 23 
Veronica Guerin (R) Fn . 5. 7:15. 9 30; Sat -Sun.. 12:45. 2:45, 
5. 7 15. 9:30; Mon.-Thrs., 6:45, 9:15 

Lost In Translation (R): Fn.. 5 15. 7:30, 9:45; Sat.-Sun., 12:45. 
3, 5 15, 7:30, 9 45; Mon.-Thrs., 6:45. 9:15 

MONTGOMERY CINEMAS, (609) 924-7444 
1325 Route 206, Montgomery Shopping Center 
Friday, October 17 — Thursday, October 23 
Veronica Guerin (R): Fri -Sat., 2:05. 4:35, 7:05. 9:35; 
Sun -Thrs . 2:05, 4:35, 7:05 

My Lite Without Me (R): Fri.-Sat., 2:30. 4:50, 7:05, 9:20. 
Sun -Thrs, 2:30. 4:50. 7:05 

Casa de los Baby's (R): Fri.-Sat.. 2:10. 7:10; Sun.-Thrs., 2:10. 
7:10 

Lost in Translation (R) Fri.-Sat.. 2, 4:30, 7. 9:30; Sun.-Thrs.. 2, 
4:30,7 

The Magdalene Sisters (R). Fri.-Sat.. 4:20, 9:30; Sun.-Thrs., 
4:20 

Under the Tuscan Sun (PG-13): Fri.-Sat.. 2. 4.30. 7. 9:30; 
Sun.-Thrs. 2, 4:30, 7 

The Housekeeper (R): Fri.-Sat.. 2:30. 7:20, Sun.-Thrs.. 2:30. 
7:20 
Thirteen (R) Fn -Sat , 4:45, 9:40; Sun.-Thrs.. 4 45 

HILLSBOROUGH CINEMAS, (908) 874-8181 
1 1 1 Raider Boulevard, Hillsborough 
Friday, October 1 7— Thursday, October 23 
Runaway Jury (PG-13). Fri,, 4:15, 7, 9:35; Sat. 1:15. 4:15, 7, 
9:35; Sun , 1:15, 4 15, 7; Mon.-Thrs.. 4:50. 7:20 
School of Rock (PG-13): Fri.. 5. 7:25. 9:50; Sat., 12:10, 2:35, 5. 
7:25, 9:50; Sun.. 1210. 2:35. 5, 7:25; Mon.-Thrs.. 5. 7:25 
Intolerable Cruelty (PG-13): Fri., 4:50. 7:20. 9.50; Sat.. 12. 
2:25. 4:50, 7:20, 9:50; Sun., 12, 2:25. 4:50. 7:20; Mon.-Thrs., 5, 
7:30 

Rundown (PG-13): Fri., 5:05. 7:25, 9:45; Sat.. 12:25. 2:45. 5:05. 
7:25. 9:45; Sun., 12:25. 2:45. 5:05. 7:25; Mon.-Thrs., 5:05. 7.25 
Duplex (PG-13): Fri., 5, 9:50; Sat.. 12, 5. 9:50; Sun., 12. 5; 
Mon.-Thrs., 5 

Kill Bill (R) Fri., 4:50. 7:20, 9:50; Sat.. 12. 2:25. 4:50. 7:20. 
9:50; Sun., 12, 2:25, 4:50. 7:20; Mon.-Thrs,. 5, 7:30 
Out of Time (PG-13): Fri.. 5:15. 7:30, 9:45; Sat.. 12:45. 3. 5:15. 
7:30. 9:45, Sun.. 12:45. 5:15, 7:30; Mon.-Thrs.. 5:15. 7:30 
Pirates of the Caribbean (PG-13): Fri.. 7; Sat.. 2. 7; Sun., 2, 7; 
Mon.-Thrs., 7 

Secondhand Lions (PG-13): Fri., 7:30; Sat.. 2:30. 7:30; 
Sun., 2:30, 7:30; Mon.-Thrs., 7:30 

Good Boy (PG): Fri., 5. 7:15, 9:30; Sat., 12:30, 2:45. 5. 7:15, 
9:30; Sun.. 12:30. 2:45. 5, 7:15; Mon.-Thrs., 5, 7:15 
Cold Creek Manor (R): Fri., 5, 9:45; Sat., 12, 5, 9:45; Sun., 12 
5; Mon.-Thrs., 5 

Texas Chainsaw Massacre (PG-13): Fri., 5:30, 7:45. 10; 
Sat., 1,3:15,5:30,7:45, 10; Sun.. 1, 3:15. 5:30. 7:45; 
Mon.-Thrs., 5:30, 7:45 
United Artists Theatres at MarketFalr 10 (609) 520-8700 
U.S. Route 1 & Meadow Road, Princeton 
Friday, October 17— Thursday. October 23 
Good Boy (PG) 
House of the Dead (R) 
Intolerable Cruelty (PG-13) 
Kill Bill (R) 
Mystic River (R) 
Out of Time (PG-13) 
Runaway Jury (PG-13) 
The Rundown (PG-13) 
School of Rock (PG-13) 
Texas Chainsaw Massacre (R) 
Under the Tuscan Sun (PG-13) 
PLEASE CALL THEATRE FOR TIMES 



o 
■v 



Top Video Rentals 

W«k of October ltOdskx 22 
Premier Video 

1. The Italian Job 

2. Bend It Like Beckham 

3. Hollywood Homicide 

4. Daddy Day Care 

5. The In-Lauis 

Princeton Video 

1 . The Italian Job 

2. The InLaws 

3. Down With Love 

4. A Mighty Wind 

5. Chicago 

West Coast Video 

1 . The Italian Job 

2. Bend It Like Beckham 

3. 2 Fast 2 Furious 

4. The ln-Laws 

5. Down With Love 



Fri. 10/17 to Thurs. 10/23 



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KExxmcsBi&czza 
UNDER THE 
TUSCAN SUN 

Fri & Sat 2 00. 4 30. 7 00. 9 30 

Sun Units 2 00.4 30, / 00 (PG-13) 



MAGDALENE SISTERS 

Ffi & Sat: 4 20. 9:30 
Sun-Thurs 4 20 (R) 



The HOUSEKEEPER 

(French English Subtiib- 1] 
Fri-Thurs 230. 7 20 (R) 



CASA DE LOS BABYS 

in rtHin 2 hi / io (R) 



MY LIFE WITHOUT ME 

In dS.il !' 30,4:50, 7 05 9 20 
Sun rtiufs 2 30, 4 50, /OS (R) 



LOST IN TRANSLATION 

Fri & Sat 2:00. 4 30. 7 00,9 30 
Sun-Thurs 2:00. 4 30. 7 00 (R) 



THIRTEEN 

Fn J Sat 4:45,9:40;SlW Thurs 4 45 (Rl 



VERONICA GUERIN (98) 

It 'ii5. 4,35. 7 05, 9:35 
Sun-Thurs 2:05.4 35. 7 05 (R) 




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• ecommerce 

• hosting & domain names 

• flash animation 

helping small businesses go online.... 

uAAAU.iviews.&l7 
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Tup 

Organized 
jibrary 

The corporate and 

business library specialists 

lor over 15 years 

is now o lie ring 

its organizational services 

for home libraries. 

We will organize 

and catalog 

your library 

so that 

"You will never buy 

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Judith Tupicro 
Phone: 609-799-5085 Fu\:609-799-6560 

JtaptenHg erob.con 

wwwJlii'oi^ani/cdlihni ry.com 
P.O. Box 7-103, Princeton, NJ 08543-7403 



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Mavis Smith Exhibit 
To Open October 25 

The Gallery of Fine Art will 
be showing original works of 
art by Mavis Smith in an 
exhibit called "SurFACES: 
Collages and Paintings. " 

There will be an artist's 
reception on Saturday, Octo- 
ber 25 from 5 to 8 p.m. and 
a gallery talk on Sunday. 
November 2 at 2 p.m. The 
exhibit will run through 
November 20. Gallery hours 
are: Wednesday and Thurs- 
day, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Fri- 
day and Saturday, 1 1 a.m. to 
6 p.m.; and Sunday, noon to 
5 p.m. Monday and Tuesday 
showings are by appointment 
only. For more information, 
call (215) 579-0050. The gal- 
lery is located at 201 South 
State Street in Newtown, Pa. 



Men Who Fly. A World War 
II Gunner's Personal Quest, 
written by Benedict Yedlin 
and Mr. Jeffers, the film high- 
lights the Buzzer's non- 
combat CTash that killed 16 
American Military Personnel. 
Interviews with family mem- 
bers of the servicemen are 
included in the video. 



"HUBCAP RETIRED": Stan Cohen's photography 
exhibit, "The Mundane of Art," currently appears 
alongside a Jim Hilgendorf photo expo at Gallery 
14 on 14 Mercer Street in Hopewell. The exhibit 
runs through Sunday, November 9. Gallery hours 
are Saturday and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. and 
weekdays by appointment only. For more informa- 
tion, call (609) 333-851 1 



T 
I 



_ . .. rr.iniiip.' A Gallery 

riopcwcii 

rramc • 

Snnn 24W.BioadSi • Hopewell, NJ 08525 I 






Free War Film Screening 
Will Be Shown in Township 

There will be a free screen- 
ing of the WWII film, Brother 
Men Who F/y, on Tuesday, 
November 11, .it 7 p.m., at 
the Community Room of the 
Princeton Township Munli I- 
pal Building m 400 Wither- 
spoon Street. The film. whU h 
I Jo coincide with Veter- 
ans' Day, is a documentary 
about the B-24 Liberator air- 
craft, also known as the 

"BllZ/ri .hkI II' i , 

The video documents the 
personal experiences* of Alex- 
ander M. Jeffers, and 
of his fellow servicemen. 
I on the book Brother 



The Buzzer's crash 
occurred in a snowstorm dur- 
ing a routine transport flight 
from an airbase in Grottaglie. 
Italy near Naples. Subsequent 
searches along its projected 
flight path were unable to 
find any wreckage or survi- 
vors and the plane was pre- 
sumes to have crashed in the 
Bay of Naples. 

Both the video and the 
book will be available for pur- 
chase at the screening with 
all proceeds benefiting Can- 
cerCare of New Jersey. 
Mr. Yedlin, a long-time 
Princeton resident, is a 
founder of CancerCare's 
Greater Mercer Area Board. 
For more information, call 
(609) 924-8752. 




"IT'S ONLY DINNER": This Mavis Smith egg tern- 
pura original will be displayed at her "SurFACES: 
Collages and Paintings" exhibit at the Gallery of 
Fine Art at 201 South State Street in Newtown, 
Pa. 




Trenton Gallery Displays 
Figurative Art Exhibit 

The Artworks Gallery in 
Trenton has announced a gal- 
lery talk featuring artists from 
its current exhibition, "Only 
Human." The talk will take 
place on Sunday, October 19 
from 2 to 4 p.m. at 19 Ever- 
ett Alley in Trenton. 

The exhibit, which runs 
through Tuesday, October 
28, features the work of 
Susan Wilson, whose work is 
primarily made of clay; Pat 
Feeney Murrell casts hand- 
made paper over her model; 
Charles Kumnick works with 
metal and miscellaneous 
objects; and Frances Hein- 
rfdl, who has worked with 
plaster life-cast, photo trans- 
fer, and realistic drawing. 

Gallery hours are Monday 
through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 
p.m. and Saturday by 
appointment. For more infor- 
mation, call (609) 394-9436. 





195 Nassau Street 
Princeton, NJ 
609.2520909 



Unique Artwork 

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Hillsborough, NJ 

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"DAVID IN PRAYER": This uncredited gold leaf 
and tempera on vellum is currently on display in 
"The Art of the Illuminated Manuscript" exhibit at 
the Gruss Center of Visual Arts at the Lawrence- 
ville School. The exhibit, which features works 
from the private collection of Boyd and Eloise 
Mackus, will run through Friday, November 14. 
Gallery hours are 9 a.m. to noon, 1 to 4:30 p.m. on 
Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday, and 9 
a.m. to noon on Wednesday and Saturday. For 
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Annual Autumn Auction 
Comes to Lambertville 

David Rago Auctions will 
hold its Annual Fall Auction 
on Saturday, October 25 and 
Sunday, October 26 at 333 
North Main Street In 
Lambertville. The 1.100-lot 
auction will include a wide 
variety of furniture pieces 
designed by several artists. 

The auction includes the 
largest George Nakashima 
collection Rago Auctions has 
ever offered. There will be 
over 60 pieces of Nakashima 
furniture with a majority of 
them coming from the origi- 
nal owners. Included is a wal- 
nut Minguren desk/table with 
a single-drawer, free-edge top 
with two rosewood butterfly 
keys. 

The designer Wendell Cas- 
tle will also be featured with 
15-20 pieces of his scheduled 
to hit the auction block. His 
items include a pair of large 
laminated walnut sculpture- 
front doors from 1976, with 
organic design and zebra- 
wood backing. Each door 
stands 98 3/4" tall and 29 
3/4" wide. The doors were 
originally built for the interior 
of a large corporation and 
are examples of Castle's lami- 
nation techniques. Another 
Castle corporate piece to be 
featured is a large laminated 
walnut executive desk. 

Other artists to be featured 
are Albert Paley, Charles 
Stendig, James Mont, Isamu 
Noguchi, Paul Evans, Harry 
Bertoia, Hans Wegner, and 
Phil Powell, a native of Bucks 
County. 

Saturday's auction will fea- 
ture approximately 135 lots 
of books and ephemera from 
several collections. Included 
in the book collection are 
many works on 20th century 
furniture and decorative arts, 
architectural and interior 
design. 

Previews for Items to be 
auctioned will take place 
from Saturday, October 18 
through Friday, October 24 
from noon to 5 p.m., and 
three hours prior to each auc- 
tion day. For more informa- 
tion, call (609) 397-9374. 



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Hopewell campus with a 
reception on Wednesday, 
October 22 from 12:30 to 
2:30 p.m. Guests will have 
the opportunity to meet the 
artists. 

There will be seven sculp- 
tors exhibiting In Hopewell. 
Each artist was selected by a 
BMS-sponsored review panel 
composed of artists, curators, 
and scholars. The panel oper- 
ated under the guidance of 
Kate Somers, curator of the 
company's corporate gallery 
In Lawrence ville. 

The first series exhibit 
opened In July at the BMS 
New Brunswick campus, and 
subsequent shows are 
planned for the Lawrenceville 
and Plalnsboro BMS loca- 
tions. Each show will remain 
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Area Corporation to Hold 
Outdoor Sculpture Series 

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PAINTING THE TOWN: "Comer Store," one of several pieces appearing in 
David Shevlino's "Towns and Cities" exhibit, will be displayed through the 
end of October at the Morpeth Gallery on 43 West Broad Street in 
Hopewell. Gallery hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
For more information, call (609) 333-9393. 




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The Odyssey' Comes to 
Area College Art Gallery 

The College of New Jersey 
CTCNJ) Art Gallery will exhibit 
"Homer's Odyssey and the 
Princeton Artists Alliance" on 
Wednesday, October 22 with 
an opening reception from 5 
to 7 p.m. The exhibit will fea- 
ture 24 paintings inspired by 
several passages of Robert 
Fagles' translation of Hom- 
er* s Odyssey. 

Two of the pieces featured 
were painted by members of 
TCNJ's art department, 
Charles McVicker of Prince- 
ton, and Ruane Miller of 
Tltusville. In addition, essays 
written by senior history 
major Meghan Gandy and 
designs by junior graphic 
design major Dave Ulrich will 
compliment the display. 
Senior art education major, 
Jessican Ivens, has designed 
a website, www.tcnj.edu/ 
-odyssey, to further enhance 
the exhibit and corresponding 
campus events. 

Weekly programs will be 
held on the TCNJ campus in 
correlation with the exhibit. 
The first event will be a read- 
ing of Mr. Fagles' Odyssey 
translation, Books 9 through 
24, on Wednesday, October 
22 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
under a tent on Quimby's 
Prairie, in front of Holman 
Hall and the library. Faculty 
and staff of the College will 
volunteer to read favorite 
passages. 

Gallery hours are Monday 
through Friday, noon to 3 
p.m., Thursday, 7 to 9 p.m., 
and Sunday, 1 to 3 p.m. The 
gallery Is located on the first 
floor of Holman Hall on the 
main TCNJ campus, 2000 
Pennington Road, Ewing. 

For more Information, call 
(609)771-2368. 



► - - » 




CHILD'S PLAY: Yasui Koyata's "Kodomo No Kuni 
(Children's Kingdom)" is one of the modern pic- 
ture book illustrations on display at "Brave New 
World," the current exhibit at the Main and 
Leonard L. Milberg Galleries at Firestone Library 
at Princeton University. The exhibit showcases 
the art and evolution of children's literature from 
around the world. It will run through Sunday, 
October 26. 



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Princeton Football Thrashed 30-3 by Colgate 
As It Hits 04 for 1st Time In Its Proud History 



With the Princeton University foot- 
ball team struggling badly last Sat- 
urday in the second half against 
Colgate, tempers started to flare in the 
coaches' box high above the field. 

One of the Tiger assistants bellowed so 
loudly about a botched offensive formation 
that he drew glances from curious fans In a 
nearby section. Minutes later, another coach 
hollered "tackle, tackle," as Colgate running 
back Jamaal Branch barrelled through 
Princeton defenders. 

By the end of the 30-3 pasting at the 
hands of the Raiders before a crowd of 
14,096 at a sunsplashed Princeton Stadium, 
the coaches were rendered speechless as the 
Tigers fell to 0-4 for the first time in the 
proud history of the program which started 
college football with its 1869 game against 
Rutgers. 

Princeton head coach Roger Hughes didn't 
mince words as he gave his initial impres- 
sions of the afternoon. "What you witnessed 
there fellas was an old-fashioned butt- 
whipping," said Hughes, whose record at 
Princeton fell to 12-21 with the defeat. 



of the game. Offensively. I thought our exe- 
cution was poor. We had some dropped 
passes and missed reads up front, one of the 
linemen blocked the wrong way on protec- 
tion. We have to be more disciplined In 
those situations." 

The game's final statistics certainly sup- 
ported Hughes' analysis. Colgate, which 
came into the game ranked No. 17 nation- 
ally among 1-AA teams and riding an 11- 
game winning streak, rolled up 421 yards of 
total offense compared to the 231 picked 
up by the Tigers. 

Branch nearly outgained Princeton on his 
own as he rushed for 191 yards on 31 car- 
ries and three touchdowns and caught one 
pass for 14 yards. The Raiders, whose last 
loss came when they fell 14-10 to Princeton 
last October, had a decided edge in first 
downs (21-13) and time of possession 
(34:08-25:52). 

The Tigers trailed 20-3 at the half and 
never went beyond the Colgate 21 in the 
second half as they were outscored 10-0 
over the final 30 minutes. 




One of the few bright spots of the after- 
"I thought that they beat us in every phase noon for Princeton was the fact that it 




NO WAY OUT: Princeton quarterback Matt Verbit gets dragged down by 
Colgate defender Antrell Tyson in the Tigers' 30-3 loss to the Red Raiders 
last Saturday at Princeton Stadium. The loss dropped Princeton to 0-4 (0-1 
Ivy League) for the first time in the program's 134-year history. 

(Photo by Bill AJktvHJ SportMion) 



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TURNED OVER: Princeton linebacker Justin Stuil races down the field for a 
25-yard gain on a second quarter interception in the Tigers' 30-3 loss to 
Colgate last Saturday. Stull, a sophomore, also had a fumble recovery and 
seven tackles in the defeat to the Raiders. Princeton, now 0-4 for the first 
time ever, will look to break into the win column on October 18 when it 
travels to Brown. tpm>s,9**m*uiavmeni 



forced four turnovers in the second quarter 
after having only picked up one takeaway in 
the first three games. But even that progress 
resulted in frustration as the Tigers could only 
score three points on the turnovers. 

"We had momentum, we had the ball in 
their side of the field," said Hughes, referring 
to the second quarter. "To come away with no 
points In three of those turnovers hurt. The 
compounding of those things certainly had an 
effect." 

Hughes acknowledged that his team is fight- 
ing to keep from getting discouraged. "I think 
confidence is a big thing," asserted Hughes. 
"As you get confident In what you're doing, 
you expect good things to happen. We're con- 
fident in what we're doing but we're not doing 
it enough of the time in crucial situations." 

Sophomore linebacker Justin Stull, who 
contributed an interception and fumble recov- 
ery to the Tigers' collection of turnovers, 
maintained that the team hasn't lost faith. "I 
don't think the team lacks confidence," said 
the 6'1, 225-pound Stull, who has been the 
team's leading tackier from game one. 

"We're taking steps every single week. It's 
just that we need to stay consistent throughout 
the entire game. At key points In the game, 
we're making mental errors." 



Stull vowed that the team wouldn't go 
through the motions the rest of the way. 
"We've got six games left and we're going to 
play hard every game," asserted Stull with his 
voice rising. "The game plan hasn't changed, 
we're planning to come out and win. Just like 
everyone else, I need to get better. I'm work- 
ing on that every practice, every game. I'm 
doing whatever I can to get better." 

As the Tigers look forward to their hip this 
Saturday to Brown (1-3, 0-1 Ivy) , Hughes 
thinks there Is time to salvage things this fall. 

"At some pqlnt In time, I believe this team 
Is going to be a pretty good team," said 
Hughes, who noted that the players have 
been spending their free time watching addi- 
tional game film in an effort to right things. 

"We're hanging together, we're circling the 
wagons. You have to stay positive. As I told 
them afterwards, we're going Into the second 
half of the season and you have to believe 
that good things are going to happen for you. 
If you work hard and persist, good things are 
going to happen." 

But if good things don't start happening 
soon, the Tigers could produce the kind of 
negative benchmarks that will result In its 
coaches continuing to see red. 

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ON THE STICK: Princeton field hockey star Natalie Martirosian, left, fights 
to control the ball with a Connecticut defender in the Tigers' 2*1 loss to 
UConn last Saturday. Against Rutgers a day later, Martirosian had an assist 
to help key the Tigers' come-from-behind 3*1 win over the Scarlet Knights. 
Princeton plays at Brown on October 18 before hosting Old Dominion a day 

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Martirosian' 's New Role Keying 
Tiger Field Hockey's Progress 



Natalie Martirosian spent 
most of last Sunday after- 
noon racing up and down the 
field at Class of 1952 Sta- 
dium as the Princeton Univer- 
sity field hockey team battled 
Rutgers. 

The speedy junior was a 
constant thorn in the Scarlet 
Knights' side, picking up one 
assist and keeping the ball 
heading to the Rutgers' cage 
as the Tigers built a 19-4 
edge in shots on the way to 
their come-from-behind 3-1 
win. 

For the Richmond, Va. 
native, her constant runs Into 
the heart of the Rutgers 
defense were the product of a 
recent tactical switch for the 
10th ranked Tigers, who 
improved to 7-3 (4-0 Ivy) with 
the win. 

"The past few games, I've 
been playing high forward," 
explained Martirosian, who 
now has a team-high of five 
assists in the season. "I like it 
a lot, it gives me a lot of free- 
dom, I can run a lot. I'm 
starting to get into the 
groove." 

Martlrosian's move was 
designed to Jump start a Tiger 
attack that hasn't yet found 
its groove. 



results," said Martirosian, 
who was a first-team All- 
American performer last year 
as she scored 12 goals and 
had six assists for a Tiger 
squad that went 12-7. "I 
think we've improved a lot 
but we still need to address 
certain issues right now. Fin- 
ishing is our number one 
thing right now." 

Princeton head coach Kris- 
ten Holmes-Winn was happy 
with how her team fought 
back from a 1-0 deficit 
against Rutgers, a rally that 
was essential in light of the 
Tigers' disappointing 2-1 loss 
to Connecticut a day earlier. 

"I think we kept the pres- 
sure on the whole game," 
said Holmes-Winn, who got 
two goals from Maren Ford 
and another from Lizzie Black 
In the win over Rutgers. 
"That was an emotional loss 
Saturday, especially when 
you control play and . don't 
get the win. I think they 
responded well, it's not easy 
to come back from that." 

In the view of Holmes- 
Winn, the strategic switch 
Involving Martirosian was a 
key factor in the Tigers' 
strong performance. 



"1 think from the beginning 
of the season we were 
expecting to have better 



"We had Natalie at low 
striker and then moved her to 
high striker," explained 
Holmes-Winn, who is in her 



debut season guiding the 
Princeton program. "The 
point of putting her deep was 
to stretch the defense, she 
really creates space for us." 

Holmes-Winn is hoping the 
team can create some space 
between it and its Ivy foes as 
it heads down the home 
stretch in quest of a 10th 
straight league tide. 

"We've got to play Brown 
(2-1 Ivy) and Harvard (3-0 
Ivy) on the road and that's 
not going to be easy by any 
means," said Holmes-Winn, 
whose club plays at Brown on 
October 18, hosts Old 
Dominion on October 19, 
and then travels to Harvard 
on October 25. 

"We're playing better than 
we did last weekend. We just 
have to stay together and 
keep pounding every day at 
the things we're trying to get 
better at." 

Martirosian, for her part, 
believes the Tigers are more 
than up to the task of topping 
Brown and Harvard. "They 
probably have high hopes for 
those games," she said with 
an ominous grin. "But I think 
we're at the point where 
we've turned the table now 
and that's what we needed to 
do. Those should be good 
games." 

— BiU Alden 




CROSSFIRE: Princeton's Hillary Schmidt, left, fires the ball past a Connecti- 
cut defender in Princeton's 2-1 loss to the Huskies last Saturday at Class 
of 1952 Stadium. The Tigers rebounded from the setback by beating 
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Tiger Men's Soccer 
Falls to Brown 3-1 

A goal by senior captain 
Jeff Hare was not nearly 
enough as the Princeton Uni- 
versity men's soccer team fell 
3-1 at Brown last Saturday. 

In upcoming action, the 
Tigers, now 4-3-2 overall and 
1-1 in the Ivy League, pi. 
American on October 1 5 
before hosting Columbia on 
October 18. 



In earlier action on its Cali- 
fornia swing, Princeton had 
topped Pacific 11-7 on Octo- 
ber 11 after falling to top- 
ranked Cal 12-7 a day 
earlier. 

The Tigers will be home on 
October 17-19 as they host 
the Inter-Regional 
Competition. 



Princeton, which trails 
Dartmouth by a game in the 
Ivy race, hosts Columbia on 
October 17. 



DIGGING IT: Princeton University volleyball player 
Marissa Becker, right, goes to her knees for the 
ball as teammate Ashley Weber looks on in the 
Tigers' 3-1 win over visiting Brown last Friday. 
Princeton went on to beat Yale 3*1 last Saturday 
as it improved to 9-5 overall and 2-1 in Ivy League 
play. The Tigers play at Dartmouth on October 17 
and at Harvard on October 18. (pnotooyBiiMavnisDortAction) 



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Tiger Water Polo 
Goes 3-1 In California 

Led by a productive day 
from John Stover, the Prince- 
ton mens water polo team 
ended its trip to California 
with wins over UC-Davis and 
Air Force last Sunday in 
games played In Stockton, 
Calif. 

Against UC-Davis in Prince- 
ton's opening game Sunday, 
Stover had two goals as the 
Tigers prevailed 6-4. He was 
Joined on the scoring sheet by 
D.J. Halliday, T.J. Edwards, 
Mike Murray, and Chris 
Kelsch. 

In the nightcap against Air 
Force, Stover scored three 
more goals as Princeton 
came away with a 7-6 win 
and improved to 14-2 overall 
on the season. 



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Tiger Women's Soccer 

Esmeralda Negron and 
Emily Behncke each scored 
goals as the Tiger women's 
soccer team beat Boston Uni- 
versity 2-0 last Monday at 
Lourie-Love Field. 

The win kept Princeton (8- 
1-2, 2-1 Ivy) undefeated at 
home this season with a 5-0 
mark and snapped the Terri- 
ers' eight-game unbeaten 
streak. 



Tiger Sprint Football 
Blasted by Army 

Overwhelmed by Army's 
ground attack, the Princeton 
University sprint football 
team fell 44-7 to the Black 
Knights last Friday. 

Army (2-1) piled up 412 
yards on the ground to drop 
the Tigers to 0-3. Princeton Is 
next in action when it plays at 
Cornell on October 1 7 



Princeton University gaff 
team finished fifth last week- 
end in the Ntttany Lion Invita- 
tional held at Penn State'* 
Blue Course in State College, 
Pa. 

Meg Nakamura was Prince- 
ton's top Individual performer 
as sh«- finished in a tie for 
ninth. In the team standings 
the Tigers trailed first-place 
James Madison, Penn State. 
Rollins, and Maryland, 
respectively. 

The Tigers will be idle the 
next two weekends before 
playing at the Pat Bradley- 
Golden Panther Champion- 
ships in Doral. Fla. on 
November 1-2. 



Tiger Women's Golf 
5th at Penn State 



NEED AN EARLY COPY mt 
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After winning its first three mornings after 9 am 

events of the season, the __ 




; PHS Alum Levine In Top Gun Role 
iFor Undefeated Emory Soccer 

. When Matt Levine headed is pleasandy surprised by how the intangibles, he scored 

- to Emory University in the fall things have turned out. "I some fantastic goals as a 

5 of 2000, he was determined wasn't shooting for records. I freshman." said Rubesch. 

^ that soccer wouldn't be the didn't even know about it who is in his 16th year head- 

5 main focus of his college until last year when they told Ing the Emory program. 
3 years. me I was moving up the "Matt is what I consider to 

i The Princeton High grad. IW*." aid Levine. whose goal be the prototypical striker. 

% who had been a star forward totals went from 6 to 12 to He has size, good feet, and 

2 on three state playoff squads 16 In his first three years of the instinct of putting the ball 

2 during his days with the Little college. into the back of the net. He's 

5 Tigers' soccer program, has got the mentality of a striker 

: Indeed broadened his hori- -j dldn - t cnoose Emory ,n that h€ feels nc Mn scor€ 

i zons in college. Levine Is ^caus* of soccer , vlewcd at any time. TTiat's an atti- 

r - majoring in economics, work- ^^ as just an extraajrr1cu . Jude that can t be developed 

P ing part-time at a hedge , ar act|v|tVi , wasn - f going lo bysomeone else, that has to 
^ funds company, and sampling ^legg j^ t0 p | ay soccer. I 
| the other options on the lib- focused on aca demics and 
I eral arts menu at Emory. wha , mc xhool ha6 to offcr 

/»' But making time for soccer I've had the chance to study a 
=|and steadily Improving each variety of things, its not been 
£ season, Levine has developed difficult to branch out." 
zlnto the main focus of the Le V , nc dld acknowledge 
| attack for a sizzling Emory tha , he had ^ injtia | dif f,. 
-squad that is 11-0-1 



season play for the first time 
since his days at PHS. 

"Making the NCAA tourna- 
ment has become my single 
goal, we have yet to make it 
in my three years here." said 
Levine. who plans to travel in 
Europe and Asia after gradu- 
ation and then find a job in 
the finance field. 



come from within.' 



Rubesch believes that 
Levine's development has put 
him in an elite status in the 
annals of Emory soccer. "I 
have had All-Americans and a 



player taken in the first round 
and culty adjusting to college soc- of toe MLS < Ma J or League 



ranked No. 3 In the nation cer -\ t too |( me a montn to 

among Division III teams. get ad j ust ed to the speed and 

Levine. who started the sea- physlcallty of the game at this 

son by scoring at least one level." explained Levine. 

goal In each of Emory's first You need to leam when to 

10 games, Is the team's high attack and when to stay back, 

scorer with 13 goals. In addi- If you make a bad touch here, 

tion, he Is now ranked third you're going to lose the ball." 

II nine In Emory In career | n me dew of Emory head 

goato (47) and points scored COrKM Mlkc R u b C sch, Levine 

' ll0 ' - h.is rarely made a bad touch. 

The 63, 195-pound Levine "When he came here, he had 



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Soccer) draft but Matt could 
prove to be one of the finest 
strikers we've ever had here," 
asserted Rubesch. 

"I don't think we've ever 
had anyone who scored in the 
first ten games of the season. 
Matt has elevated his game as 
the team has reached a 
higher level." 

Levine credits his hot start 
this season to playing on a 
better team. "I would say in 
general things are easier for 
me with this team," he added. 
"We are moving the ball up 
the field with more numbers. 
The ball is coming across to 
me which is making things 
much easier since I'm not 
having to take it and turn on 
it as In the past three years." 

As Levine winds up what he 
believes will be his final sea- 
son of competitive soccer, he 
Is looking to get back to post- 



"I made the state tourna- 
ment three times in high 
school but that's not like 
being in the NCAA tourna- 
ment. I'm so happy with the 
team's performance so far 
this year. We had a winning 
record the last three years but 
we struggled to win going 
down the stretch. We are win- 
ning the wishy-washy games 
this year." 

Levine, though, is not 
wishy-washy when he reflects 
on how playing soccer has 
enriched his college experi- 
ence. "While the first three 
years of soccer may not have 
been the most rewarding in 
terms of wins, I love the guys 
on this team," maintained 
Levine. 

"All my best friends are on 
the team. We've had great 
road trips, getting to fly to 
places like Chicago, St. Lou- 
is, Cleveland, and New York 
City. It's fantastic that we've 
done so well so far this sea- 
son. We've really bonded, we 
have some new characters on 
the team." 

With a well-rounded charac- 
ter like Levine at striker, 
Emory could be a force if it 
makes it Into the post-season. 
—Bill AJden 



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STRIKE FORCE: PHS alum Matt Levine, right, 
looks for the ball in recent action for the unde- 
feated Emory University (11-0-1) soccer team. 
Levine, a senior striker, is the team's leading 
scorer this season with 13 goals and has risen to 
third all-time at the school in goals (47) and 

points (116). (Photo courtesy ol Emory Sports Inlomution Oepirtment) 

OQOOOOOOO Q B QB 

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about the profes- 
sional football player 
who caught only four 
passes in his 10-year 
career which gamed 
a total of only four 
yards, but accounted 
tor four touch- 
downs? His name 
,was Ray Pinney, an 
offensive lineman on 
Pittsburgh Super 
Bowl teams in the 
late 1970s who later 

& laved in the old 
SFL. Twice with the 
Steelers and twice in 
the USFL, Pinney 
lined up as a tight 
end in goal-line situ- 
ations. All four times 
he caught touch- 
down passes, making 
his final career 
receiving stats four 
receptions for four 

yams and four TDs. 

* * » 

Larry Kehres is prob- 
ably the greatest col- 
lege football coach 
vou've never hard of. 
That's because he 
works at Division III 
Mount Union Col- 
lege in Allliance, 
Ohio. But at any lev- 
el, what Kehres has 
done is astounding. 
Going into the 2003 
season, the Purple 
Raiders had won 96 




of their past 97 games 
and six of the past 
seven NCAA III 
national champion- 
ships. From Septem- 
ber of 1996 until 
December of 1999, 
Mount Union won an 
NCAA-record 54 
straight games. Bet- 
ter yet, Kehres has 
built his dynasty 
while accpeting 
everybody who 
wants to be part of it. 
Kehres never cuts a 
player, even though 
about 200 show up 

for practice each fall. 

* * * 

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who is credited as a 
co-writer on a Brooks 
& Dunn song? It's 
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his boat was named 
"Sunday Money." 
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Lynch's Odyssey From Paris 
Lands Her at Head of PHS Pack 



LOOSENED UP: PHS senior Meaghan Lynch, fore- 
ground, enjoys her pre-workout stretch at prac- 
tice last week. Lynch, who joined the Little Tiger 
cross country program last year after spending 
the previous five years at the American School of 
Paris, has emerged as the top runner for the Little 

TigerS. (Photo by Bill AJien/NJSporlAclion) 



Meaghan Lynch was more 
than a little apprehensive 
when she joined the Prince- 
ton High girls' cross country 
team last fall. 

After spending the previous 
five years running in a rela- 
tively low-key program at the 
American School of Paris, 
Lynch wasn't quite sure what 
to expect once she started 
competing with the Little 
Tigers. 

"1 was really petrified," said 
Lynch with a grin. "I knew it 
would be bigger and 1 was 
concerned about the idea of 
practicing everyday. We had 
only run three days a week in 
Paris. " 

It didn't take long, howev- 
er, for Lynch to fit in with her 
new mates. "We met as a 
team before school started 
and that really helped a lot," 
recalled Lynch. 

"These girls are great, I 
always know that they're 
there for me. Then In the first 
meet, I'd never gone under 
20 minutes before [at 5k) and 
I did it by 20 seconds. I knew 
I could do It after that." 

Lynch, a junior last year, 
quickly emerged as the num- 
ber two runner on a squad 
that put together one of the 
best seasons in the history of 
the program as it took second 
in both the Mercer County 
Championship and the Cen- 
tral Jersey Group III meet and 
then placed fifth in the presti- 
gious Meet of Champions. 

This fall, Lynch brought a 



much different mindset to her 
preseason training knowing 
that she'd be at the front of 
the PHS pack in the wake of 
the graduation of last sea- 
son's top runner, Dilshanie 
Perera. 

"I was pretty determined 
this summer,'' 
spoken but 



Lynch, for her part is dedi- 
cated to reaching the most of 
her potential. "I want to run 
hard enough so that I'm com- 
pletely satisfied with the out- 
her apart from her competi-come." said Lynch, who 
tors. "She's tough, very scratched the surface by run- 
tough." added Bridgett. not- ning a personal record of 
ing that he has held Lynch 18:50 in the win over 
back slightly so far in an Hopewell and plans to coo- 
effort to increase the team's tinue competing in college, 
collective pace. »| Just wanl to ^vow that 

" I think when some athletes lve 9 iv « n H m V best. What it 
said the soft- surge ahead of the others it's comes down to is having no 
competitive due to more than working regrets. You know that when 



Lynch. "It's my last season in hard. They all work hard but yo u CTOSS th« line 
high school and I'm deter- some can focus at such a Lynch certainly has no 
mined to do everything I can. high level that they maximize regrets on how her running 
Running is a huge passion of their talent and are able to has progressed in her journey 
mine. 1 want to be good. I execute better than other from Paris to Princeton, 
want to work really hard." people." — Bill Alden 

With Lynch leading the 
way, the Little Tigers have 
picked up where they left off 
last year. The team Is unde- 
feated at 7-0 and recently 
toppled powerful Hopewell 
Valley, handing the Bulldogs 
their first defeat in a CVC 
meet In five years. 

"We definitely want to try 
and improve on last year's 
achievements," acknowledged 
Lynch, who Is typically joined 
up front at meets by team- 
mates Eleanora Splnazzl, Car- 
olyn Sholl, and Susanne 
Hansen. "We really try and 
work as a group. We know 
that every girl counts and we 
know everybody's 
capabilities." 



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PHS head coach Andre 
Bridgett knows that Lynch 
brings a lot to the table. 
"Meaghan has progressed 
very, very well," said 
Bridgett, whose team has a 
dual meet with Notre Dame 
and Hightstown on October 
21 at Veteran's Park in 
Hamilton before competing at 
the Mercer County Champi- 
onship on October 31 . 

"She's definitely enthusUs 
tic about running. She's will- 
ing to do the work to take 
herself to the next level." 

In Brldgett's view, Lynch 
has mental qualities that set 



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BORN TO RUN: PHS senior cross country star 
Meaghan Lynch races through a sprint drill at 
practice last week. Lynch Is the top runner for the 
Little Tigers, who are off to a 7-0 start and will 
run in a tri-meet against Notre Dame and Hights- 
town on October 21 before competing in the Mer- 
cer County Championships on October 31. 

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5 PHS Field Hockey Going Overtime 
s In Battle to Make State Tourney 

8 The Princeton High field P , HS *"*" *E te ^^^ 

» hockey team Is no stranger to P^S mldf.eld ratiier than 

*" drama normal defensive post. 

5 .. «. « - came through with a goal 

g **? suf u ferln 9 a 2 * ^ with 7:27 leh. 

h- time heartbreaker to Stelnert ... . . . . . 

S on October 7 In which they t Minutes later the LittJe 
> squandered an early 1-0 lead, THjers found themselves in 
2 the Uttle Tigers were deter- * cir fourth ^^Tk 
2 mined to topple once-beaten ** ***° n P " S , ^ d *« 

1 Notre Dame last Friday. "PP" hand ^ ta ^ c . ftrst 
S A<4 . ... .. ■ „ , extra session but ended up 

5 After controlling the ball for fa|| , as Notre Damc ^^ 

: much of the first 40 minutes on a , stroke n|ne 

* Jn 016 ^^ cc S , f i" ^ h u d ^nutes into overtime. 

- 1-0 with 12:55 left In the .. nLiC 

§ game. Within a minute. . Afterward, longtime PHS 

£ though, the Little Tigers ^ coach Joyce Jones was 

2 evened the score as Sam Philosophical as she reflected 
E Moni blasted a Beth Fledorek on *»* disappointing setback. 

* pass into the cage. » m P^ ° th u e cff f£' Mld 
^ all u a. 1.1 i. , j Jones, who Is her 28th sea- 
g Although the Irish regained ^ hea(J pHS ^ t 

othe lead less than two > mln- , and we amK back 

- utes later. Ohatdldn take the (he y ^ |n and we 

5 fight out of the Uttle Tigers. ^ back _ We were ^ 



with them but we lust dldn 
finish around the goal." 
In Jones' view, the perfor- 
mance marked a step forward 
for her players. They all had 
their moments." said Jones. 
"They're working better. 
We're scoring now so that's a 
good sign." 

Jones was happy with sev- 
eral of the individual perfor- 
mances turned In by her 
charges against Notre Dame. 
"Sam Monl is playing well, 
she has a lot of speed and 
carries the ball well down the 
field," said Jones. "Annie 
Knickman usually plays back 
and she came through with a 
score. Lauren Murphy and 
Whitney Brunner are playing 
well." 

PHS, which fell to 2-6 last 
Monday after losing to 
Hlghtstown 3-2 In yet 
another overtime contest, has 
set Itself up for some more 



* drama as it must have a .500 
record on October 24 In 
order to qualify for the state 
tournament. After facing 
Lawrence on October 14, the 
Little Tigers will play 
Hopewell Valley on October 
16 at Mercer County Com- 
munity College, play at Not- 
tingham on October 17, and 
then host WW/P-N on Octo- 
ber 21. 

"They asked me today 
when the cutoff Is, they know 
what they have to do." said 
Jones, whose 2002 team fell 
one win short of making the 
state tourney. "They need to 
continue to generate the scor- 
ing opportunities and put the 
ball in the cage." 

If they can accomplish that, 
the Little Tigers could write a 
happy ending to the drama 
they have produced so far 
this fall. 

— Bill AJden 




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STICKING WITH IT: PHS field hockey coach Joyce 
Jones makes a point in a practice session earlier 
this season. Jones, who is in her 28th season 
guiding the Little Tigers, has led her team to a 2-6 
mark. PHS, which must have a .500 record on 
October 24 in order to qualify for the state tourna- 
ment, plays Hopewell Valley on October 16 at 
Mercer County Community College, plays at Not- 
tingham on October 17, and then hosts WW/P-N on 

October 21. (Photo by Bill AlienMJSportAcbon) 



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PDS' Leith Making An Impression 
As He Finally Takes Vp Football 

It's a shame that Dylan shooting guard for the PDS duced so far. "He had a heck- 
Leith waited until this fall to squad, taking up football has U va game today, he did every- 
take up football. been a better-late-than-never thing," said Devlin. 



Last Friday, the senior run- proposition, 
ning back for Princeton Day 
School gave a glimpse of his Tm ^^ 



3 tons of fun," 
natural gifts on the grid.ron in ^ ^ ^ mshed (of a 

the waning moments of the tofa| of 63 ds and a touch . 

Panthers game against visit- down ^ ^ , QSS tQ Jower 

,ng Tower Hill School. HU) Tm ^ , tQok ^ 

With PDS trailing by 28-6 chance to pIay< lts a Iot of steal with him. 

and backed up deep in its f^ We're not winning so 

own territory, Leth ripped off mats not gcKX j We've got a 

runs of 18 and eight yards to j ot t0 wor k on - 

give the team some breathing 



"He's been great to have on 
the team. He's an athlete, he 
can run, catch, and throw. He 
would really like to play col- 
lege football. Some Division 
III teams are looking at him 
and someone's going to get a 



room. 



It was Leith's respect for 
the work of PDS head foot- 

The 61, 200-pound senior ba n coacn Bruce Devlin that 
then launched a beautifully convinced him to come out 
thrown halfback option pass f or football. "Coach Devlin 
to Lon Johnson that resulted was mc assistant basketball 
in a 50-yard gain. coach last winter and he said 

A Will King throw to why don't you give me a 
Johnson for 13 yards on the chance in football," recalled 
next play gave the Panthers a Lelth. "Coach is always in 
touchdown with Leith bulling your corner. Whenever you 
in for a two-point conversion need him, he's there. I appre- 



to narrow the gap to 28-14. elate that." 

Leith, however, wasn't Starting at square one, 
quite finished with his skills Lelth has been working on Jh" r ough "We're working 
demonstration. After PDS 



With his squad off to a 0-4 
start, Devlin Is hoping the 
team can steel Itself to break 
Into the winning column. 

"We can do some nice 
things," said Devlin, whose 
club plays at St. Joseph's of 
the Palisades on October 18. 
"We have to play from the 
beginning whistle to the final 
whistle. There's a lot of learn- 
ing going on. 1 can see that 
each game we're getting bet- 
ter and better." 
Lelth believes the team Is 
the verge of a break- 




on 



TRIPLE THREAT: PDS senior running back Dylan Leith prepares to uncork a p 
halfback option pass in the waning moments of the Panthers' 28-20 loss to «- 
visiting Tower Hill last Friday. Lelth hit Lon Johnson for a 50-yard gain on 
the play. In addition, Leith, playing in his first year of football, rushed for 63 
yards and a touchdown against Tower Hill and also caught a 49-yard scor- 
ing Strike. (Pnoio h & AaenKi SgonAoa* 



hard, everyone on the team 



mastering the basics. "I was 

recovered an onside kick, running straight up In prac- h ' a rpuV 0^7 lot of effort",' 

Lelth lined up as a receiver tice in the beginning of the ^ ^^ .| ^^ , ts a mat . 

and flew down the middle of season," explained Lelth. ter Q f b rea ki n q mc cyc i e Q f 

"I've worked on getting low , osln and gctt , ng that wln . 

and cutting. Every week It n| attltude . Well get 

seems to get better. It s be tter •• 

enjoyable to go out and work —BUI Alden 

and see the results." 
Devlin has been Impressed 

with the results Lelth has pro- 



the field, snaring a 49-yard 
touchdown bomb from King 
as time expired to narrow the 
final margin to 28-20. 

For Leith, who had previ- 
ously confined his sporting 
focus to basketball as a star 



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Stuart Field Hockey Edges Hun 
As it Rackets up the Intensity 

The Stuart field hockey reaction as the Tartans end. She knows when to go 
team was all smiles as it took fought to hold onto their slim forward and when to stay 
a one-goal lead against the lead. "I think that in some of back. She has a great field 
Hun School early in the sec- our recent games we have let sense." 
ond half last Wednesday. up," said Williams. "We 

For Tartans' senior link didn 't Quit at all today. We 

Angela Harrington, however. went io* the ball every single 

the joy of the moment trig- fi ™e. We hustled back. It was 

gered a flashback to the amazing." 

team's loss to Lawrenceville 

in mid-September. _ , , 

. ... . , . , The quality and intensity of 

back t0 Stuart's performance heart- 

ened Tartans' head coach 



9fU 



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was thinking 
Lawrenceville when we were 



?"??*'?£.*£'& m«*v b™*- t* * ■**« 



2 scored two goals," recalled 



bly the first game this season 



no^S" W3S th,nk,n9 ^ WeVC ^ aycd a "^ 60 

9 minutes," asserted Bruvlk, 

Harrington used that mem- w hose team scored on a Kelly 

ory to fuel an outstanding Fltzpatrlck goal which was set 

performanc€, setting things U p by a feed from Taylor 

up on offense and thwarting Blazewskl. 

Hun's attack at the top of the 



circle as Stuart hung on for a 
hard-earned 1-0 win over the 
Raiders. 

"I think I had my best game 
ever," asserted Harrington. 
"As a link you have to be 
good on offense and defense. 
As a team, we were all going 
to the ball. We were backing 
■«'h other up all over the 
field. I think overall we had 
the will to win. I think It's the 
•jarne we have played ." 

Harrington's classmate, 
1 ftriy Williams, had a similar 



"In the past we have given 
back some leads. I thought 
we moved our passing game 
well today. I thought we went 
for the ball better than we 
have all year. I'm very, very 
pleased." 

In Bruvlk's view, Har- 
rington's performance at the 
link position, which Is crucial 
to the team's transition game, 
was a major spark for Stuart. 
"I thought Angela played an 
outstanding game today," 
said Bruvlk. "She did every- 
thing right on the offensive 



The Tartans built on their 
complete effort against Hun 
as they cruised past Ranney 
School 5-0 two days later to 
clinch their fifth straight 
Patriot Conference title. In 
Improving to 6-1-2, Stuart 
got two goals from freshman 
Megan Fitzpatrlck together 
with a goal apiece from 
Blazewskl. Kelly Bruvlk, and 
Kelly Fltzpatrlck. 

In upcoming action, Stuart 
plays at Peddle on October 
15, at WW/P-S on October 
17, and at Notre Dame on 
October 20 before starting 
play In the state Prep 
playoffs. 

As defending state Prep 
champions, the Tartans are 
determined to rise to the 
occasion once again come 
tournament time. "I think we 
have a good shot," said Har- 
rington after the win over 
Hun. "As well as we played 
today, I think we can step it 
up a notch." 

-BillAJden 





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LINKING UP: Stuart field hockey star Angela Harrington battles for the ball 
in early-season action. Harrington, a senior link, has been a key performer 
for the Tartans, who are off to a 6-1-2 start and will play at Peddie on 
October 15, at WW/P-S on October 17, and at Notre Dame on October 20. 
Stuart, the defending state Prep champions, will then begin play in the 
state Prep tournament. (PtwiotvBiiAm^jspoiiAciion) 

Struggling Hun Field Hockey 
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The Hun School field 
hockey team Is going to have 
to pull the trigger more If It 
wants to break out of a slump 
that has seen It win just one 
of Its first 1 1 games. 

"We're coming out and say- 
ing that we need to play 
defense so the other team 
doesn't score Instead of being 
aggressive at the goal," said 
Kathy Quirk, the team's act- 
ing head coach in the 
absence of Sarah Ostermuel- 
ler who has been ordered by 
doctors to stay off the field 
due to a broken ankle. 
"We're tending to play 
defense Instead of offense." 

The Raiders' 1-0 loss to vis- 
iting Stuart last Wednesday 
was a case In point as Hun 
was outshot 14-1 but played 
valiantly while withstanding 
the pressure it was under 
almost the whole game. 

"I think our whole defense 
did a nice job today," 
asserted Quirk, whose goalie 
Sara Gonzalez recorded 13 



saves, many of which were of state Prep tournament starts 
the point-blank variety. "Sara on October 22. 
did a nice job, she stayed up The Raiders' stubborn play 
on her feet. She's been work- ^ fa e back has drawn some 
ing hard and the whole unwanted praise from Its 
defense has been giving her a f^ *y m faed of having the 
tremendous amount of sup- opposing coaches tell me 
port. Tarah Kiman played wria t a nice game we played," 
solid for us. " said Quirk with a laugh. "Our 

heads have to stay up. It's not 

Quirk knows that the team Uke they don't give me 100 
must work the ball up the percent." 



field if it's going to get roll- 
ing. "We need to improve the 
transition from defense to 
offense and start going right 
to the cage," added Quirk. 

The Raiders made a step in 
that direction last Saturday as 
they battled Blair to a 2-2 tie 
in double overtime as Kate 
Klrnan and Megan Goeller 
both found the cage. 

Hun, now 1-7-3 after tying 
Steinert 1-1 last Monday, 
hosts Princeton Day School 
on October 15, plays at Ped- 
dle School on October 18, 
and then hosts George 
School on October 21. The 



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Stuart Runners Make It 5-/or-5 p««. we're looking to be the 

f r» • r> r i^i as Dest Pre P B team tnat ** can 

In Patrtot Conference Title Meets be.~ 

lowed by Laura Brienza In -BUI AJden 



Coming into the Patriot 
Conference Championship 
last Wednesday, Stuart cross 
country coach Tom Har- 
rington warned his runners 
that they would have to be at 
their best if they wanted to 
win the school's fifth league 



sixth (20:36), Catherine Cur- 
rie in seventh (21:28). and 
Caroline Cancelosl In 10th 
(22:38) 

"The field was leveling out 
and the girls knew it," said 
Harrington, whose team's 



o-own in as many tries. score of 41 bettered Rutgers 

The Tartans got the mes- Prep (60), Saddle River (79), 
sage and brought their A- Pennington (96). Ranney 
game to the meet at Gill-St. (99), and GUI (125). 
Bernards in Gladstone as they "Everybody ran their sea- 
took four of the top ten son's best. I've never had four 
places to accomplish their girls all finish under 22:38 in 
five-peat. the same event. Emily's time 

Emily Driscoll led the way was the second fastest in 
for Stuart as she came in school history on any course, 
third, covering the 3.1 mile just off the record of 19:58." 
course in 20:02. She was fol- Harrington's runners have 

an ambitious schedule in the 
next few weeks as they pre- 
pare to defend their Prep B 
crown at the end of the 
month. 

"Our next four meets are 
against Prep A teams," 
explained Harrington, whose 
team competes at Blair on 
October 11 and will run 
against Peddie and Lawrence- 
ville and Oak Knoll in upcom- 
ing meets. "We want to corn- 




Boys' Soccer: Despite a 
big performance from Nicho- 
las Devine. PHS fell 4-3 to 
Hopewell Valley last Thurs- 
day. Devine scored two goals 
and Mike Freedman added 
another as the Little Tigers 
fell to 3-4-1. In upcoming 
action, PHS plays at Trenton 
High on October 16 before 
hosting Allentown on October 
21 





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Girls' Soccer: PHS was 

edged 1-0 by Hopewell Valley 
last Thursday. The Little 
Tigers, who fell to 4-2, play 
at VWV/P-N on October 15, 
host Trenton High on Octo- 
ber 16, and play at Allentown 
on October 21. 



Girls' Tennis: A sweep at 
doubles and a dramatic three- 
set win by top singles player 



FIELD OF DREAMS: The PHS football team takes a break last Saturday as it 
christened the school's new AstroPlay artificial turf surface at Harris Field 
with a valiant 16-3 loss to WW/P-N . The game was knotted at 3-3 midway 
through the fourth quarter before WW/P-N broke through with two late 
touchdowns. PHS senior running back David Mostoller had another produc- 
tive outing as he gained 76 yards rushing for the Little Tigers, who fell to 
0-5 and play at Ewing on October 17. (pwo*uA>*vHjsoo*tc») 

Alicia Ling helped PHS top matchup against Red Bank at Trenton on October 21. 

Nottingham 4-1 last Thursday scheduled for October 14. In 

in the Central Jersey Group the next week. PHS has a 

111 state playoffs. By virtue of home match against WW/P-I* 

the win, the Little Tigers (8-2) on October 16 before playlnj 

advanced to a semifinal at Peddie on October 20 am 





Football: Unable to slow 
down Blair's rushing attack, 
Hun fell 43-16 to the visiting 
Bucs last Saturday. Blair (3-1, 
2-0 MAPL) rolled up 234 
yards on the ground as it 
dropped Hun to 3-2 (2-2 
MAPL). The Raiders will play 
at the Peddie School on 
October 18. 

Boys' Soccer: A Scott 
Loesser goal gave Hun a 1-0 
win over visiting Blair last 
Saturday. In upcoming 
action, Hun, which Improved 
to 7-4 with the win over the 
Bucs, has road games at 
Hopewell Valley on October 
16 and at Peddle School on 
October 18 



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GirU Soccer : The Raid- 
ers lell 1-0 to Blair last Satur- 
day as they dropped to 2-8 
on the season. Hun hosts 
Hopewell Valley on October 
16 before playing at Peddle 
on October 18. 





Boys' Basketball: PDS 

head coach Charley Ross 
resigned last week, leaving 
the program looking for a 
replacement with the start of 
practice Just weeks away. 

GirU' Soccer: Lauren 
Hlnkel had a hat trick to lead 
PDS to a 6-0 romp over GUI 
St. Bernard's last Thursday. 
Ellen Cook scored twice and 
Cat Tomasulo added another 
as the Panthers Improved to 
8-4. PDS plays at 
Morristown-Beard on October 
15 and at Pennington on 
October 18 before starting 
play In the prep State A tour- 
nament which Is scheduled to 
begin on October 21. 



Girls' Tennis. The Pan- 
thers fell 5-0 to powerful Hun 
last Friday. In upcoming 
action. PDS, now 9-2. has 
road matches against WW/P- 
N on October 15, at Stuart 
on October 17, and at Gill St. 
Bernard's on October 21. 



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k >ret10y»ais 737-362? 

Beauty Salons: 

LA JOLIE • mi MtVI i' ' ii 
Massagi 



Dining Out? 



Princeton & Near Vicinity: 



*•* Ambasssdors, Nobel prln 
winners, students A ordinary 

mortals < . v 

food dn ■ 

1 am al THE ANNEX RESTAURANT 

"'% al 1261/? Nasv.i 

«.« Fresh, seasonal American 
A International cuisine 

I.W & I H THE OAROEN 
CAFE 

lunches & corporate/private catri 

Oebvery OOMM 5702 • >' « 

*** From miles around, Chi- 
nese food connoisseurs comrx* tc 

lays a week tor Cantonese Huwi. 

■ & Snchuan artreas a OakcaxaM to 

i.'i-LE SZECHUAN RESTAURANT 

3YOB Old Trenton Rd (1/2 mil* south ot 
'i Mown Rd traffic M\ West 

Wflndw BOMSMOB 

... Middle Eastern cuisine at 
Montgomery Shop. Ctr. 

hummous. sh>s 
paNMBnf) •• • 
RANT S 20C 



repairs Tultylown. Pa 215 945 2200 

ST. JOHN CHMMIEV SWEEPS 

leaning and/or certrtlcalions 
t imnney liners, caps, dampers A masonry 
repair Waferproofbg . 609-333-1334 

• Electrical Contractors: 

JOHN CIFBLLI I leclncal Contractor 
installations, repairs Resldeniial/comii 

• ■nil insured/bonded 921-3238 
NASSAU ELECTRIC Insulation & 

repairs Residential & commercial service 
upgraded Trouble shooting Outlets 
installed Fully mured, licensed & bonded 
Free Eslimaiei 924-8623 

• Electrolysis: 

MARIS BOORAD Board ( ertiliod eleclrol- 
years e«penence Formerly Seller 
Image ol Princeton Now localod a short 20 
minutes away in Bordentown 
Free parking 609298-0478 

• Fencing: 

SUBURBAN FENCE u\i sol styles 
< lence display |ust off U S 1 , near 
la 532 Mulbon , 
Innlon 60S«6 1000 

• Floor Covering Contractors: 

REGENT FLOOR COVERINO, INC. 

7 Rle 31 N, Ptnnogton 737 2466 

• Floor Reflnlshlng/lnstallations: 

APPLIED WOOD PRODUCTS, INC. 

iiimii. >i im, > ■, .'.it,-. i ,h,v -u gijaj 

• Fuel Oil A Oil Burners: 

LAWRENCEVILLE FUELS«vo 1925 
F«al os. puntMng rung, a* cond & energy 

,i,< '....v. a. .*. . ■ , . r 

PRINCETON FUEL OIL CO. ve 1942 
BSJSt BaSfalBni ■• utol otOUBl) hBBttlQ 

IRlfcRdaalar 
220 AkjundN SI Pm 924 1100 

• Furniture Dealers: 

WHITE LOTUS HOME lO0\ cotton 
handmade futon matlrasses, Aah maple & 
cherry bad* Convartioie cewchs* tables & 
dressers Handcrafted Mission furniture 
Etqmailetabncs Petows 
202 Nassau Si. Pt«xeton 609-497 1Q0Q 

• Furniture Unpalnted: 

ERNEYS UNFINISHED FURNITURE 

miure w\ New Jersey from Country to Con 
temporary ' 2607 Rte 1 Aiternata 
LAwmncavAe .5300097 

• Garden Centers: 

MA2UR NURSERY A FLOWER SHOP 
265 Baker s Bean Re 587 9150 

OBAL GARDEN MARKET INC. 
Evarvtwg tor the garden A» under Roadat 

t^ CanaT Pmcaion _M^^M 

Glass: Residential/Commercial: 

St.* 

BJ60 



CONSUMER 

BUREAU: 

How It works: 

1 N0 Busings Firm Pays A Fee 
Of Any Kind In order to get on 
or stay on Consumer Bureau's com- 
plete unpublished Register of Recom- 
mended Business People (which can 
be checked tree of charge by calling 
609-924-0737). 

2 In Order To Be and Remain 
On Consumer Bureau's Reg- 
ister Of Recommended Bus 



I nesses, e ach recommended business 
firm must resolve to the satisfaction of 
Consumer Bureau's all-consumer Volun- 
teer Panel each and every customer 
complaint of theirs (If any) known or 
reported to Consumer Bureau; 

3nWI.V Bii€ln»*e Firmc fn 
Good Standing on the Bureau's 
Recommended Register are allowed to 
advertise In these Consumer Bureau 
Town Topics classified columns (while 
sharing with other Consumer Bureau 
Recommended business firms the cost 
of such advertising). 
► TOR FREE 'INFORMATION OR 
"XfiCE with any business firm 



ited within 20 miles of Princeton, call 

609-924-0737 



CONSUMER 
BUREAU 



ro 



Since 1967 152 Alexander Street 
P Box 443, Princeton. NJ 08540 



• House Cleaning: 

FUTURE BEST Home Maintenance 
1 lime Pre & post moving 
Carpets, floors, windows Insured 890$ 165 

• Insurance: 

ALLEN A STULTS CO. S«we 1881 
ijroup 
100 No Mam St. Highlstown 448 1 10 

MecLEAN AGENCY 
3rd floor. 138 Nassau Street. Pm 683 9300 

PRUDENTIAL INSURANCE 
Oownlown Pnnceton 683-9300 

• Kitchen Remodeling: 

FLEETWOOD KITCHENS A BATHS 
107 Sherman Ay Rantan 908 722-0126 

• Landscape Architects: 

DOERLER LANDSCAPES, Inc. 

EaWi 1881 CBrtBad andfcapi i heacfie 
contractors Steven J Ooorief N j C i A 
■ASO0529 UwwancevtlB 609-396-3380 

• Landscaping Contractors: 

BIANCO LANDSCAPING Revitalurg 
evsimg landscapes Complete lawn m*nia- 
nance Gradng and backhoe serve* Plsni- 
mg RR hes Stone Driveways 921 7537 

DOERLER LANDSCAPES. Inc. 
i ■" • • .• ,..' , ■•:, \ 

contractors Steven J OoertH NJCL* 
•AS00529 LawtwKevAe 83SSM BOO 

ISACS L*wr> ft OardM Service, fete. 
Landscapng & dasjgn S»one patos & »ak 
ways SAaaonal dean-ups A year-round maw 
tonanoa F«rtAtatorv aersBorv over saedng 
mutofwio S mowng n »> SS3 •« I H 

JOHN KOCHIS LANOSCAPINO 
Speoatoix) *> bfua stone A bncfc wefts A 
pafK» Foundaoon (andacapng Sprnwer sys 
toms K*> viaurtd 737>3478 



NELSON OLASS A ALUMINUM 



» Gutter Cleaning & Repair: 

QUTTERMANI 

>ava« dabm by hand tnwn HYOROacfiKS 



BJBB 



Sahara restau- • Handymen: 



MR. HANDYMAN AS3S varvfy c* home 

repairs & service* Bonded A nsunra 
•SAteNcson guaran»ed • 60»?99434e 



«wwa* mvnrii t uwiuii 

LAhdscape dtwgn, ra ai orBt c n A cat* Spnng 

& Fat clean ups Patos A stcne waAs 

Tree sarvce 609-5300505 

• Laundries: 

LAUNDROMAT OF PRINCETON .. > - 
dry A Kta or as* serve* LargacApACiy 
wdshars Open 7 days Pm Shop O 924-3304 

• Lawn Maintenance: 

BUOMO LANOSCAPINO. fate 
8rc» A tnueeion* waAs BtMtt 

(oonbnuad nea column) 



• Lawn Maintenance: (comnued) 

LAWN DOCTOR ol PRINCETOM- 
PENNINOTON-HOPEWELL 609-737-6181 

PRINCETON PROPERTY UAINTE 
NANCE V-'m. f-i ', n-iantenance 

• Lawn Mowers, Garden & Farm 
Equip. Sales & Service: 

JOSEPH J. HEMES A SONS, Inc. 

Ccrrvneroal/residentiai S^poty Toro A 
Echo n rs & snow 

throwers 1233 US 206 at S 18 92^-4^77 

• Limousine Service: 

A-1 LIMOUSINE Save 1970 All airports 
jj-'As o03, Carpnones 924-0070 

• Lumber Yards (See Bldg. Maris): 

COLEMAN'S HAMILTON SUPPLY Co. 

Lumber 3ows, 

eiry&hard- 
Hamfl' 
ton Twp 609-587-4020 

• Mason Contractors: 

ANDREOLI CONSTRUCTION CO. 

steps patios & foundations Quarry 

& ceramic tile 466-6565 

DESANTIS A MAMMANO Masonry Res 

loralion Buck A stone porting 391-7240 

• Moving & Storage: 

ANCHOR MOVING A STORAGE 

Mayflower agents Family owned & operated 
lor 22 years Princeton 921-3223 

BOHREN'S Moving A Storage. Local & 
long distance moving 4 storage A full service 
WORLDWIDE relocation company United Van 
lines Autri Agt Robbmsviile 206-1470 

PRINCETON VAN SERVICE The Mov- 
ing Experts Full service moving, packing & 
storage Antiques, artwork & pianos 
Free price quotes 609-497-9600 

Website www pnncetonmoving com 

• Painting & Decorating: 

CERTA PROPAINTERS 

Interior & exterior painting Slaming 
Power washing Minor repairs 

609-577-0099 & 80O462-3782 

JUUUS H. OROSS INC. Serving the 
Princeton community since 1959 Professional 
interior & exterior painting & paperhanging 
Power washing Owner operated & site super- 
vised Free est Prompt service 924-1474 

IRIE Painting - Deamcnd Leith 
Professional interior & exterior painting Owner 
operated Free Est , Rets 609-584-8808 

JM PAINTING Interior/Exterior 
Since 1986 Owner operated Fully insured. 
Free estimates 732-213-6060 

N.J. PAINTING CO. Intenor/eitenor 
Power washing Thorough preparation 
Owner operated Nine years experience 

609-468-1777 

PETROS PAINTING Co. Interior/exterior 
Power washing 30 yrs experience Free 
estimates 'Quality work 100% guqranteed " 
Insured Owner operaled 

609 291-0321 or 609-933-4228 

TK PAINTING Exterior/mienor painting 
Wallpaper removal Power washing 
Windows re- glazed Quality work 
Owner operaled 609-947-3917 

VITOS PAINTING Specializing in interior 
pamlng & exterior, loo Wallpaper removal 
Power washing & more 
Free estimates 609-203-0353 

• Painting ft Paper Hanging: 

GROSS. JULIUS H. 924 1474 

Painting, paper hanging & decorating by 
Pnnceton owner smce 1959 

O'HERN WORKS, INC. 
Custom paper hanging 
Painting 466-7875 

B.R. PERONE i-u-sidential & commercial 
paining and wallpapering Custom color 
matching Free est Fully insured 921-6468 

• Painting ft Plastering: 

DAVID SMITH Specialty Plasterer 
Repair loose, damaged or cracked plaster 
Tnted and Venetian plaster 732 521-4910 

• Paving Contractors: 

CROSS COUNTY PAVINO, Inc. Drive 
ways & parking lots 

FELIX V. PIRONE A SON PAVINO A 
landscape CO. & resurfao- 

ing Crushed stone Tar & chips Seaicoatng 
Drainage. Grading A excavating R ji'ioan lies 
Belgian block Prnceton 924 

STANLEY PAVINO Since 1953 BlacMop 
driveways A paring lots Free estimates Mas 
lerCard A Visa accepted 609-386-3772 

• Pest Control: 

COOPER PEST CONTROL Graduate 
eniomciogrsis loceuy ownedAopeiated 
»rce 195 5 Fuity ws. Free eat 799-1300 

• Pharmacies: 

FORER PHAMAACV Rehab ecwo 
Praccnpftons. surgjeais. SKk room supptos 
160 Wiiherspoon Princeton 921-7287 

• Plumbing A Heating: 

M.J. GROVE PLUMBING A HEATINO 
Reprs A aaer a tor is r*jtchen A bathroom 
remodeAna Lc No 489. No 3274 A No 
06442 55 H M*n Wndsa 44&€083 

LAWRENCEVILLE FUEL Srce 1925 
Repars. remodeWvgAmiaAations Hoi weic 
heaters N J Lc •3533.16 Gordon Av. 
L a wten c evAe 696-014! 

MICHAEL J. MESSKK Ptumttnf A 
Heating, Inc. UC #8063 Al ptombrv) A 
nMBng saw ?Ahr Insured 9244*02 

SANNINOS Srxe 1945 
16 OaMand Rd Pnnceton 609-924 1878 

• Printers: 

LDH PRINTING UiriM Comptew Pnrnig 
Serve* ORsetACcor Type c eong, Bjndng 
Fast serves Rubber stamps **totary serve* 
^ 206. 8MB a Pm 984461 

S A A DUPUCAT1NO NBC -& speed 
dUpacaang Soral & Tnema SrtJrq due- 
prrang 5 k-oepandance Way. of Route ' 
92^ 



• Railings: Iron Work: 

DINGER BROS. IRON WORKS Estab 

1928 Interior & exterior raiings, fences & 

'dow guards 
Futfy insured Free estimates 609-396-1554 



• Real Estate: 

PRUDENTIAL NEW JERSEY PROP- 
ERTIES ; -g people find homes since 

Prn 609-430-1288 
STOCKTON REAL ESTATE Realtors. 

374 MLS Sales, rentals 
--noersSt. Prirx 



• Records, CDs & Cassettes: 

PRINCETON RECORD EXCHAHGE 

CDs. LPs, DVDs New & used Bought & sold 
isstcal. iazz & rrore Of3en 7 days 
20 Tulane Street. Princeton 921-0881 

www prex.com We8uyCDs&LPs©prex com 



• Recreational Vehicles: 

KADCO CAMPING CTR. New & used 
campers/lraiiers Supplies Hitches Financing 
Rentals 1214 R| 130. Robbmsviile 443-1133 



• Renovations: 

VAROAS PROPERTY DOCTOR 

General contractors Renovation & restoration 
Carpentry & masonry Pamlmg Deck staining, 
etc 609-5300505 



• Roofing Contractors: 

FLESCH'S ROOFING For all roolmg & 
gutlerwork BuiH-m Yankee gutters, cornice & 
slate work 609-394-2427 

R.A. McCORMACK CO. Since 1970 
All types roofing Fully insured 737-6563 

PRINCETON ROOFINO CO. 
Serving Greater Princeton area residents 
Free estimates 609-584-9572 

BRUCE RICHARDS Home Improve- 
ments, Inc. Rooting & siding specialists 
since 1972 Mercervilte 609-890-0542 

THERIAULT ROOFINO Repairs, all 
types of new roofs, gutters. Stony Brook Rd 
Hopewell 609-466-2645 



• Septic Systems: 

BROWN, A.C. Sewer & dram cleaning 
New septic systems installed Cesspools 
cleaned & installed Excavating Trenching 
Lawrence ville 882-7888 & 799-0260 

STINK Y'S Septic Tank Pumping Sep 
tic tanks, holding tanks & cesspools cleaned, 
pumped & back-Hushed Sewer & dram clean- 
ing Video pipe inspections 609-466-5422 



• Siding Contractors: 

LAWRENCEVILLE HOME IMPROVE- 
MENT CTR. Since 1952 Vinyl siding/custom 
trim Free esl Lawrenceville 882-67097 

M. A.K. CONSTRUCTION Siding, roofing 
& remodeling 800821-3288 

PRINCETON SIOINO CO. 
Serving Greater Princeton area residents 
Free estimates 609-584-9572 



• Slipcovers: 

MIRANDA SHORT Slipcovers, curtains, 
cushions & home furnishngs 921-1908 



• Stereo ft Video Repair: 

ELECTRONIC SERVICE LAB 

Guaranteed work on all makes ol VCR's. stere- 
os, TVs & camcorders Open 6 days at 140 
Scotch Rd, Ewing 609-883-7555 



• Stone Driveways: 

ANDREOLI CONSTRUCTION CO. 

Crushed stone for driveways Delivered and/or 
installed 466-6565 



• Stone, Natural: 

TRENTON STONE A MARBLE CO. 

Sione quarry operators smce 1870 Marble. 
si3te. granite, limestone, bluestone & more 
Wilburtha Road, W Trenton ! 882-2449 



• Surgical Supplies: 

FORER PHARMACY Sales & rentals ol 
ostomy & hospital supplies i equip 2 blocks 
from Princeton Hospital IfjOWitherspoon, 
Prn 921-7287 



• Swimming Pools ft Spas: 

SYLVAN POOLS SYB6 1946 Affordable 
in-ground pools m concrete Pool Supplies 
Montgomery Center. Rte 516 & 206, 
Rocky Hill 921-6166 



• Tile Contractors: 

P J. CIARROCC A A SONS Custom tile 
& marble Floors, backspiashes. counter tops, 
6howers A tubs. Repairs & regroutmg Fully 
insured Relerences 609-291-0233 



• Transmissions: 

LEE MYLES Free check & free lowtig 
659 Rt 130. E Windsor 446-COOO 



• Travel Agencies: 

AMERICAN EXPRESS TRAVEL 

AGENCY 10 Nassau St. Prnceton 921-8600 
KULLER TRAVEL CO. Owner operaled 
s*xe 1947 Complete travel arrangements 
108 Nassau Street. Princeton 924 2550 



• Tree Service: 

LAWN A TREE CARE OF PRINCE- 
TON, Inc. Over 9 years o» lawn and tree 
care Sprayng. prunng. stump removal and 
landscape maintenance Tree planting 
Deep root tartazaten Fetomowrvg 
n ater cnew ?2*; - " 

TIMBERLAHD TREE EXPERTS 
Prunno, toppng A shapng Tree A stump 
removal speoafcsts 75 ft bucket tack & 
crane avariabte Futy roved Free consuta- 
aons Server cteen ckscount 609687-91*0 



• Waterproofing Contractors: 

ANDREOU CONSTRUCTION CO. 
Basemenj wierproofei g mtenor French 
drans FJaerer gradng LAetme warranty 



• Pumps ft Well Drilling: 

SAMUEL STOTHOFT CO. imc Sree 
1866 Rump nswAMicn a serce WeBoYAng 
Rt3t FWmgton X8-782-2116 



• Windows: 

LAWRENCEVILLE HOME IMPROVE 
MENT CTR. aj "voes c* wrxjows s*xe 
1952 Free etanMBS BTDWBHWB 

RJLMcCORAlACK CO. S K* 
Al styws A ma** brands TSB 8SB3 



Rec Department Holding 
Tryouts for Travel Hoops 

The Princeton Recreation 
Department is holding tryouts 
in the next couple of weeks 
for its competitive youth 
travel basketball program. 

Teams will be formed in the 
following age groups: Under- 
11 boys; U-12 boys: U-12 
girls; U-13 girls; U-13 boys; 
U-14 girls; and U-14 boys. 

The tryouts, which will be 
held at the Princeton High 
gym, are open to Princeton 
residents and nonresidents 
who attend school in Prince- 
ton. Those falling in the latter 
category will have to be 
approved by the Central Jer- 
sey Basketball League Board. 

As for the age calculation, 
by way of example, under- 11 
means that a player was 10 
years or younger as of Aug. 
31,2003. 

The following information 
includes the dates and times 
of the tryouts for the specific 
teams: 

Under- 11 Boys- October 20 
at 6 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. and 
October 22 at 6 p.m. - 7:30 
p.m. under the supervision of 
coaches Pete Young and 
Andy Smuckler; 

Under-12 Boys- October 20 
at 7:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. and 
October 24 at 6 p.m - 7:30 
p.m. under the supervision of 
coaches Jeff Gary, Andy 
Smuckler, and Mark Ettln; 

Under-12 Girls- October 20 
at 6 p.m.- 7:30 p.m. and 
October 21 at 6 p.m. - 7:30 
p.m. under the supervision of 
coaches Lew Barber and 
Peter Thomas; 

Under- 13 Boys- October 21 
at 7:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. and 
October 23 at 7:30 - 9 p.m. 
under the supervision of 
coaches Jeff Bechler, Tom 
Dunlap; 

Under- 13 Girls- October 20 
at 7:30 p.m. - 9 p.m. and 
October 24 at 7:30 p.m. - 9 
p.m. under the supervision of 
coaches Tim Moran and 
Leslie Moran; 

Under-14 Girls- October 22 
at 6 - 7:30 p.m. and October 
23 at 6 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. 
under the supervision of 
coaches: Jacque wBrooks 
and Jim Brooks; 

Under-14 Boys- October 22 
at 7:30 p.m - 9 p.m. and 
October 23 at 7:30-9 p.m. 
under the supervision of 
coaches Doug McNeely, Pete 
Young, Jim Brooks; 

Prospective players should 
arrive 1 5 minutes prior to the 
start of the tryout. Players 
must attend one of the two 
tryout sessions but it is rec- 
ommended that they attend 
both so as to be fully evaluat- 
ed. No pre-registration is 
necessary. 

For more information, call 
Ben Stentz or Evan Moorhead 
at 609-921-9480 or log onto 
www.princetonrecreation. 
com. 






DON'T TRADE IT- 

DONAHIT! 

Miry be eligible for rax deduction 




t AMERICAN 
LUNG 
ASSOCIATION 

lHo.577.LUNG 

www.donateyourcar.com 



PEOPLE 



Conference Will Honor 
Princeton Philanthropist 

Marilyn W. Grounds of Corporation. 
Princeton will be honored as 
Outstanding Philanthropist at 
the 2003 New Jersey Confer- 
ence on Philanthropy. The 
conference, sponsored by the 
New Jersey Chapter of the 
Association of Fundraising 
Professionals (AFP-NJ), is 
scheduled for October 30, 
and will be held at the 
Hanover Marriott in East 
Hanover. 

Ms. Grounds was nomi- 



ences of New Jersey's annual 
fund over the past 10 years. 

Also to be honored at the 
conference are The Friends of 
Matheny, Peapack as Out- 
standing Community Organi- 
zation; and ETH1CON. a 
Johnson & Johnson compa- 
ny, as Outstanding 



Physician Named 'Top Doc* 
By South Jersey Magazine 

SJ Magazine named Law- 
renceville doctor George S. 
Taliadouros as one of the 
its "Top Docs" in southern 
New Jersey for its September 
2003 issue. 

When he moved to the 




Pennington School Appoints 
New Head of Middle School 



tennis. The Pennington uate of Moses Brown School 8 
School employee also worked in Providence, R.I.. and spent • 
at Holdemess School In Ply- a year of post-graduate study g 
The Pennington School has mouth. N.H., serving as chaiT a t Stowe School in Bucking- £ 

announced the appointment of the history department and ham, England. 

of Peter Y. Rapelye as head director of athletics 

of its middle school Mr. Rapelye served in the 

Rapelye, who assumed his U.S. Army Reserves from 

position in July, had pre- 1970 to 1978, earning an 

viously been head of upper honorable discharge with the 

school and director of se- rank of captain. He is a grad- 



condary school counseling at 
Dedham Country Day School 
since 1997. As head of Pen- 
nington's middle school, 
Rapelye oversees the curricu- 
lum and directs the faculty 
and boarding students in 
sLxth through twelfth grade. 



The new head of Penning- ° 
ton's middle school and his 5 
wife. Janet Levin Rapelye,-" 
who is dean of admission at J 
Princeton University, live in z 
Princeton. 



George S. Taliadouros 



Dr. Taliadouros Is currently 
clinical assistant professor 



South Jersey area In 1988, 

nated by Young Audiences of Dr. Taliadouros introduced u 

New Jersey and will be recog- the Innovative treatment of f OB^YN'aT'the Unw'eTsTty 

nized for her 20-year tenure assisted reproductive techno- f Medicine and Dentistry at 

on its board of trustees. She bgies. Robert Wood Johnson 

has served as the organiza- , n 1994 Dr Taliadouros Hospital, 

tion s chairman since 1985. used c „ nical expertise and 

Ms. Grounds and her hus- medical research to found the 
band, Peter, have given more Delaware Valley Institute of Educational Center Elects 
than $65,000 to Young Audi- Fertil.ty and Genetics. mu ^ Member$ 

The Newgrange School and 
Educational Outreach Center, 
an independent, state- 
approved day school that 
serves children ages 8 
through 18 with language- 
based learning disabilities, 
has elected new board mem- 
bers for the 2003-4 season. 

They are: Frieda Tydings of 
Princeton, a CPA and parent 
of a graduate of Newgrange 
Educational Outreach Center; 
Linda Gilmore and Patty 
Lamb, both of Princeton, and 
both parents of Newgrange 
School students; Elliott Wlslar 
of Princeton, senior vice pres- 
ident of Investments, UBS, 
Inc.; Reginald Dickerson of 
Trenton, director of Youth 
and Adult Development Divi- 
sion of Mercer Street Friends; 
Dr. Mary Farrell of Rldge- 
wood, professor, Farleigh 
Dickenson College; and Rlch- 
M.D.. of 




m v* 






S^ 




tik 


\ 






YOUNG ARTISANS: Princeton Montessori School 
will be holding a student art exhibit titled "Reflec- 

D° n f"' ^/ aSt « a ? 1 t in il* I* 0nt9 e ?t2 r Center ° n aVd Levandowskl, 
Houte 206 on October 17, from 6-7:30 p.m. Pic- i^^^c^^ 

tured left to right are two of the participating art- 
ists, Taylor Rinehart and Lindsey Spring. 



12 Months No Payment 
& No Interest 

With A New Dave Lennox Signature" 
Collection Home Comfort System 

Plus, Get Up To $900 Rebate 
From Your Utility Company 



Yes, it's true, you can buy a new high efficiency Dave 
Lennox Signature" Collection air conditioner, furnace, 
thermostat and PureAire indoor air purifier and receive 
up to $900 in rebates. As an added bonus this system 
comes with... 

. GUARANTEED ENERGY SAVINGS... 

Not many companies are brave enough to put this in 
writing, but we guarantee you'll save 25% on your 
heating and cooling bills over your old central system 
in its first year or we'll refund you the difference. 
We're that sure. But that's not nearly all you save... 

. 5 YEAR GUARANTEE ON PARTS AND LABOR... 

Read other companies' guarantees closely. You'll find 
that most don't dare include labor, which can be hefty. 
Ours does. If you have a breakdown on your Lennox 
furnace or air conditioner in the next 5 years, you're 
not paying for it. Simple as that. Plus, we offer... 

. NO PAYMENT, NO INTEREST FOR 12 MONTHS*... 

That's right Save money, stay comfortable, and don't 
pay for this system until next fall Then pay it off, or 
make easy payments 

AH you have to do to schedule a free, no-obligation 
survey is call us at 609-799-3434. Our Comfort Consult- 
ant will schedule a time to come to your home for your 
FREE survey. 



Princeton Air LENNOX - 

www pnncetonaif.com 
' subject to cred* approval Ofer expres Nov. 28. 2003 



The 2003-4 board will 
work to extend the 
Newgrange School Into the 
larger community by offering 
workshops, seminars, train- 
ing, and referral services to 
educators, literacy tutors, 
parents, and others con- 
cerned with language-based 
learning disabilities. 



Carrier Clinic Appoints 
Director of Information 

Carrier Clinic recently 
appointed Romualdo Arrtola 
of South River as director of 
Information systems. Prior to 
his promotion, Mr. Arriola 
served as network manager. 

Since his employment at 
CarTier In 1999, Mr. Arriola 
oversaw the development, 
operational, and strategic 
enhancements for the Infor- 
mation systems. With over 1 5 
year of experience In the FT 
field, he has also served as 
assistant systems director and 
PC resource manager for the 
New York City Criminal Jus- 
tice Agency. 

Mr. Arriola earned a Bache- 
lor of Arts degree In socio- 
logy from the University of 
Maryland, and a Master of 
Science degree In computer 
science from Pace University. 



TOWN TOPICS 

is 
printed entirely 

on 
recycled paper. 




NEW MUSIC TEACHERS AT WALDORF: Two new 
string teachers joined the music faculty at The 
Waldorf School this school year. Tomasz Rzeczyc- 
ki, Princeton, will teach fourth and fifth grade cel- 
lo, along with orchestra for sixth, seventh and 
eighth graders. Jacqueline Watson, Trenton, will 
teach fourth and fifth grade violin and viola. 



Peter Rapelye 

Mr. Rapelye Is a 1970 
graduate of the University of 
Rhode Island with a B.A. in 
political science and history, 
and earned a master of sd 
ence degree in international 
relations from the London 
School of Economics. Mr. 
Rapelye worked at Dedham 
Country Day, where he 
taught history, directed the 
community service program 
and coached Ice hockey and 





tfvc \v^aoU/U tcwrvb 



needlepoint, 

knitting yarns, 

and 



itWW II II HII I 

20 S. Main St. Pennington, NJ 





accessories 



609.730.98cx 




Experiencing 




Resp ap§€& 
TftistedJ 



Ma son, Griffin & Pierson, PC 

( ••■ - ■">■ ' l l J5S 



Since 1955, Mason, Griffin & Pierson, PC. has 

built a reputation for providing dependable 

legal -counsel with integrity and 

personalized service. 

• Bankruptcy 

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• Real Estate and Land Use 






101 Poor Farm Road, Princeton, NJ 08540 
609-921-6543 • www.mgplaw.com 




Isabelle Sayen 

Isabelle Sayen, an environ- 
mentalist and lifelong Prince- 
ton area resident, died peace- 
fully at home on Michaelmas 
Day, September 29. The 
cause of death was cancer. 

Bom Isabelle Bums Guthrie 
in Baltimore, her family had 
long-standing ties to both the 
town and Princeton Universi- 
ty. She graduated from Miss 
Fine's School and Vassar Col- 
lege; and In 1946, married 



the late William Henry Sayen, 

rv 

Her husband "Harry" was 
influential In New Jersey's 
public service arena, and 
among the many board posi- 
tions he held were chairman 
of the board of trustees of the 
British- American Educational 
Foundation and governor of 
the board of Rutgers Uni- 
versity. 

Mrs. Sayen was a teacher 
at Miss Mason's School prior 
to becoming Interested In 
environmental issues in the 
1950s. 

In 1960 and 1961, she was 
co-chair of the staging for 
Princeton's Hospital Fete, fol- 
lowing several years of fund- 
raising for Princeton Health- 
Care System, formerly called 
the Medical Center at Prince- 
ton. Also in the 1960s, Mrs. 
Sayen became active In the 
peace movement and orga- 
nized many events locally and 
throughout New Jersey in 
opposition to the Vietnam 
Wnr Mrs. Sayen was fre- 
quently Invited by congres- 
sional leaders in Washington, 
D.C. to discuss Issues. 

Starting In the 1970s, Mrs. 
Sayen began to dedicate her 
time fully to environmenta- 
llim From 1970 to 1994, 
she was the founder and 
operator of New Jersey Safe 
Energy Alternative Alliance. 




THE PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CHAPEL 



Welcomes 
you to 

Morning Worship 
with Jazz 

Sunday 
October 19, 
at 11:00 a.m. 



The Rev. Dr. Thomas breidenthal 

I li m of Religious Life and Dean of the Chapel 
sermon: "Gaining First Place" 

Penna Rose 

I 'ii. ii t< il I 'l Chapel Music 

David Messineo 

I i ii u ipal University Orj>.» list 

The Chapel Choir will sing. 

(r with Ml ." b) |ohn Gardner, 
with Ahdia Clagett '05, soloist 
and "Pso/m 91." a rap setting by Hiroyuki 

I in |] 

The Princeton Ui ii 1 11 H . |a I nsemble, 
directed by Am In 'ii, l'| lit anker 
will be playing in the sei\ 

I ha I ni" eti rn ' Inivw at) I hapel is located at the 
- igton Road and William Stn 



In 1978. she was a founder 
of The Coalition for Nuclear 
Disarmament, and in that 
capacity lobbied Congress to 
reduce weaponry and to limit 
waste disposal of nuclear 
materials and radioactivity. 

Blinded by macular dege- 
neration 18 years ago. Mrs. 
Sayen continued to work 
unassisted, and would often 
testify at hearings in Newark, 
Trenton, Philadelphia, and 
the Capitol, always arriving 
by public transportation. Mrs. 
Sayen went on to found the 
Coalition for Peace Action. 

She was a lifelong student, 
enrolling in dozens of courses 
at Princeton University over a 
40-year period. Desiring to 
be well researched and ba- 
lanced In new proposals, she 
studied physics, history, and 
philosophy, as well as politics 
and engineering. 

Mrs. Sayen assisted her 
husband Harry In many of his 
activities, often with concepts 
for his weekly radio broad- 
casts. She was also a great 
hostess, entertaining many 
U.S. presidential candidates. 

She continued to campaign 
for important community 
causes until this year, and 
recently tried to save the 
dinosaur and fossil collection 
of the University as a 
resource for students. 

Mrs. Sayen is survived by 
four sons. 

A private burial service will 
be held this week. Memorial 
contributions can be made to: 
Coalition For Peace Action 
Education Fund, 40 Wither- 
spoon Street, Princeton, N.J., 
08540; or to Hospice, The 
Medical Center at Princeton, 
208 Bunn Drive, Princeton, 
N.J., 08540. 



Betty Ribner Borok 

Betty Ribner Borok, 93, of 
Princeton died Friday in the 
Pavillion at Forrestal. 

Born In Linden, N.J., Mrs. 
Borok was a former resident 
of Delray Beach, Fla., before 
moving to Princeton six years 
ago. 

Mrs. Borok was a Judea 
Leader, life member of 
Hadassah, and active in the 
United Synagogue of 
America. 

In her youth, she was a 
New Jersey State tennis 
champion, and In later years, 
a championship golfer. 

Wife of the late Samuel 
Ribner and Max Borok, Mrs. 
Borok is survived by a daugh- 
ter and son-in-law, Drs. Sho- 
shana and Mel Sllberman of 
Princeton; a son, Elliott Rib- 



ner, of Columbia, Mo.; a 
brother, Abraham Gelfond; a 
sister, Helen Lalin, three 
grandchildren, four great- 
grandchildren, and a step 
son. 

Funeral services and burial 
were Monday in Iselin, and a 
period of mourning will be 
observed at the Silberman 
residence in Princeton. 

The family requests that 
memorial contributions be 
made to: Princeton Hadas- 
sah, c/o Debbie Glick. 5 Cat- 
briar Court. Belle Mead. N.J., 
08502. 



Martin D. Levine 

Martin D. Levine. 56, of 
Princeton died Tuesday at the 
Medical Center at Princeton. 

Bom in Asbury Park, he 
was a former resident of East 
Brunswick, before moving to 
Princeton six years ago. He 
was the founder and chief 
executive of MarketSource 
Corp. of Cranbury. In addi- 
tion, he was the founder of 
Kindle a Spark Foundation, 
and former president of Col- 
lege Stores Research and 
Education Foundation. 

He had recently been hon- 
ored by Ernst and Young 
Corp. as Entrepreneur of the 
Year, and also awarded the 
Eagle Lifetime Achievement 
Award by the National Asso- 
ciation of College Stores. 

A graduate of the Univer- 
sity of Arizona, where he 
earned bachelor's and mas- 
ter's degrees In marketing, he 
was an avid golfer and cow- 
boy. He had also served In 
the U.S. Army National 
Guard. 

Son of the late Irving and 
Rose Levine, he is survived by 
his wife, Monica Bean Levine; 
son Jonathan Levine of 
Princeton; daughter Lauren 
Levine of New York City; sis- 
ter Sandra Bidwell of Nutley; 
step-children Taylor and Kelly 
Langone of Princeton; niece 
Alison Pearce; and nephew 
David Bidwell. 

The funeral was Wednesday 
and a period of mourning is 
being observed at the Levine 
residence In Princeton. 

Memorial contributions may 
be made to Kindle a Spark 
Foundation, 10 Abeel Road, 
Cranbury, N.J., 08512, or 
The Brain Tumor Center at 
Duke University, P.O. Box 
3624. Durham. N.C., 27710. 



• Mailbox • 
TOWN TOPICS Online 

Lvvww.towntopics.com 



The Princeton Pharmacy 

At the University Store Ground Floor 



Monday-Friday, 9 a.m. to 7 p. m 
Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 
Sunday 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

FREE Delivery 

Senior Citizen Discounts 

Call 924-4545 




Wife of the late Patrick 
Heaphy and sister of the late 
Bessie Fallon, she is survived 
by a niece, Rita Kowal of 
Bayonne, and special friends, 
the family of Alan F. Cook of 
Lawrenceville. 

A Mass of Christian Burial 
was celebrated Tuesday at St. 
Paul's Roman Catholic 
Church. Interment followed in 
the parish cemetery. 

Memorial contributions may 
be made to St. Paul's School, 
218 Nassau Street, Princeton 
08542. 



Maria G. Cipelli 

Maria "Norma" G. Cipelli, 
92, of Princeton Junction, 
died October 8th at a Univer- 
sity Medical Center at 
Princeton. ■ 

Born in Asola, Province of 
Mantova, Italy, she immi- 
grated to the United Sates in 
1947. 

Wife of the late Mose T. 
Cipelli, she is survived by a 
son, Herman, of Princeton 
Junction; a daughter, Edda 
Burton of Westwood; four 
grandchildren; and three 
great-grandchildren. 

A Mass of Christian Burial 
will be celebrated Saturday, 
October 18, at 9:30 a.m. at 
St. Paul's Roman Catholic 
Church, 214 Nassau Street. 
Burial will follow in the parish 
cemetery. 

Friends may call Saturday 
morning at the Kimble 
Funeral Home, 1 Hamilton 
Avenue, from 8:30 a.m. until 
the time of departure to the 
church. 

Memorial contributions may 
be made to a charity of the 
donor's choice. 



Elizabeth J. Heaphy 

Elizabeth J. Heaphy, 92. of 
Princeton, died October 9 at 
Morris Hall/St. Mary's 
Assisted Living Facility, 
Lawrenceville. 

Bom in County Leitrim, Ire- 
land, she had been a long- 
time resident of Spruce Circle 
in Princeton before moving to 
Morris Hall two years ago. 

Mrs. Heaphy retired from 
Lahiere's Restaurant, where 
she had been a waitress for 
several years. She was a 
member of St. Paul's Church 
Altar Rosary Society and the 
Golden Agers of St. Paul's. 



William F. Wright 

William F. Wright, 93, a 
former Princeton resident and 
retired advertising executive, 
died on September 15 at 
home in Wayzata, Minn. 

Mr. Wright, who resided in 
Princeton for many years 
until 1963, graduated from 
The Hill School in 1928 and 
from Princeton University in 
1932. 

He began his advertising 
career in Philadelphia with 
the F. Wallls Armstrong 
Agency, and later joined J. 
Walter Thompson, now part 
of WPP Group, where he 
worked for 28 years. 

He was the account repre- 
sentative on the Champion 
Sparkplug, Shell Oil, and 
Ford Motor accounts. He 
retired as a vice president 
and director in 1963. 

Mr. Wright was also an 
international golfer. He 
played for Princeton Univer- 
sity and later was a member 
of the Springdale Golf Club 
while he lived in Princeton. 

He is survived by his sec- 
ond wife, Rosita Hawley; 
daughter Susan Wright; son 
Peter Wright; and step- i 
children MacDonald Hawley. * 
James Hawley, Lisa Hawley, 
and Lane Cole; and grand- 
children William Wright, 
Karim Zaouch, Jim Burden, 
and Amanda Wright. 

Memorial contributions may 
be made to the Bay Head 
(NJ) Yacht Club Welfare 
Fund. 



NEED AN EARLY COPY? You 

can buy a TOWN TOPICS at our 
office, 4 Mercer Street, or at Princeton 
newsstands Wednesday mornings 
after 9 a.m. 



Kale's Tall Color 

Hardy Mums- S n pots 
Icicle | ansics 
Ornamental JCale & Cabbage 
| umpkins, (_jourds and more! 





||vrw. kalesnursery.com 



609-921-9248 



Honr»: 

Mo*. -Sat. 9:00-6.-00 
Sand*? 10:00-4:00 



Directions: From Princeton, go south on Rt 206 to Carter Rd , 

Turn nghl, Kale's is 1 1/2 miles on the left. 



Copies of 

TOWN TOPICS 

dating back 

to 1946 

are now available 

on microfilm 

at the 

Princeton 

Public Library. 



RELIGION 



St. Paul Church To Hold 
Bereavement Meetings 

St. Paul Church, located al 
214 Nassau Street, Is spon- 
soring an eight-week bereave- 
ment support group. "The 
Many Roads to Healing After 



princetgjii 

Library hours 

Monday-Thursday 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. 

Friday-Saturday 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 

Sunday 1 p.m. to 6 p.m. 

@your library ™ , the library's quarterly guide, has details 
of programs and services. Pick up a copy on your next visit 

Princeton Public Library 

Princeton Shopping Center • 609-924-9529 • www.pnncetonlibrary org 



Loss tor those who are 
grieving the loss of a loved 
one. 

The group will meet in the 
St. Paul Church Rectory on 
Tuesday evenings from 7:30 
to 9:30 p.m. Meeting dates 
are October 28. November 4. 
November 11. November 18. 
December 2. December 9. 
and December 16. 

The group is open to any- 
one in the community and 
will be lead by Gloria Lynch, 
certified bereavement facilita- 
tor. Registration is required 
and space Is limited. For 
more information call (609) 
443-8148. 



Jesus and Christianity." 
Rabbi Brenner is the Director 
of Multifaith Education at the 
Aubum Theological Seminary 
in New York City in addition 
to being the principal rabbi at 
String of Pearls. The discus- 
sion will be held at 7 p.m. on 
Sunday, October 18 at the 
Unitarian Universallst Con- 
gregation on Cherry Hill 
Road In Princeton. For addi- 
tional information log on 
www.stTlngofpearlsweb.org. 



afterlife, examining mystical donation 



String of Pearls Hosts 
Adult Education Program 

Opening the new year's 
adult education program 
offered by String of Pearls 
Reconstructlonlst Congrega- 
tion, Rabbi Daniel Brenner 
will lead a discussion on 
"Jewish Perspectives on 



Congregation Beth Chaim 
Plans Course on Afterlife 

A mini-course exploring 
Jewish teachings on the after- 
life Journey of the soul will be 
hosted by Congregation Beth 
Chalm from 6:45 to 8 p.m. 
on three Wednesdays this fall. 

The classes are scheduled 
for October 22, November 
12 and December 3. They 
will Investigate Judaism's phi- 
losophy of death and the 



afterlife teachings as well as 
practical Jewish approaches 
to dying and mourning. The 
classes are designed to help 
participants come to terms 
with their own beliefs about 
these issues. 

The presenter will be Sim- 
cha Raphael. Ph.D., author of 
Jewish Views of the After- 
life. Dr. Raphael has lectured 
extensively on death and the 
afterlife, and teaches In the 
religion department at La 
Salle University. 

Topics of discussion will 
include, "Do Jews Believe In 
Life After Death?". "Afterlife 
Journey of the Soul In Jewish 
Mysticism." and "Afterlife 
and the Renewal of Jewish 
Death Rituals." 

All classes will be held at 
the synagogue. 329 Village 
Road East, Princeton Junc- 
tion. The course is offered 
free of charge for synagogue 
members, and non-members 
are asked to make a small 



Seating is limited. To regis- 
ter or for more information, 
call (609) 799-9401 or vistt 
www.bethchaim.org. 




Simcha Raphael 



Directory of Religious Services 



All Saints' Episcopal Church 



ascpnn@aol.com www .ilh.uni >tu I i.iihniij iln. ■ driHuuN lor h.nih 



your life is a gift. come thank the glver. 
Worship at All Saints 1 Church 

SUNDAY Holy Eucharist at 8:00am & 10:00am* 

COFFEE FELLOWSHIP in South Reception Room 

following 10 a.m. Sunday Worship 

Sunday School & Adult Forum 1 1 :30am- 1 2: 1 5pm 

WEDNESDAY Holy Eucharist al 9:30am 

•Nursery care available 

16 All Saints' Road, Princeton • 609-921-2420 

(North of Princeton Shopping Ctr, off TcrhunelVanDykc Rd) 

The Rev Richard A. Kunz, Rector Frances Fowler Slade, Music Dree cor 




Kingston Presbyterian Church 

4565 Route 27, Kingston (609) 92 1 -8895 

Visitors Welcome Child Care and Nursery 

Sunday Services 

Worship Services at 8:30 a.m. (less formal) & 1 1 a.m. 

Contemporary Service at 6:00 p.m. 

Church School for all ages at 9:30 a.m. 

(childcare for children under 3.) 

Pastor John Heinsohn www. kingstonpresbyterian. org 



Mother 



(jod Orthodox Mission 

at St. Joseph's Seminary, 85 Mapleton Rd atCollegt Rd Wosl Princeton 

M9-252-0310 Sunday, 10am: Divine Ului» m """ 

siiiui.iv. 9am Church School (every other wk) 

ma. Ird Wednesday ' lOpra Women's Group 

Saturdii). 5 00pm \duii Bible Stud) 6:00pmi Veapen 



Kingston United Methodist Church 
j An Open, ( 'aring t ommunity of Faith 
A\ Sunda) Service: 10 A.M. 

. ^^| Nuim i\ .iv.iil.ibli 

kT i tiit .n.iii i du< ttion foi \n v 

vjj^l i V- 

^^Bl www kingston-umcono CjL 

V Church Street, Kingston • 609-921-6812 



Westerly Road Church 




37 Westerly Road 

Princeton, NJ 

924-3816 



Nun I It noiniii.ilioii.il 
Evangelical 



Witherspoon Street Presbyterian Church 

124 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, NJ 
Reverend M. Muriel Burrows, Pastor 

10:00 a.m. Worship Service 

9:00 a.m. Sunday School for Adults 

10:00 a.m. Sunday School for Children K-6th Grade 

Nursery Provided * Ramp Entrance on Quarry Street 

(A multi-ethnic congregation) 

609-924-1666 • Fax 609-924-0365 



5f. Paul's Catholic Church 

214 Nassau Street, Princeton 

Msgr. Walter Nolan, Pastor 

Saturday Vigil Mass: 5:30 p.m. 
Sunday: 7:00, 8:30, 10:00, 11:30 and 5:00 p.m. 



QUAKER MEETING 
FOR WORSHIP 

Stony Brook Meetinghouse 

Quaker & Mercer Roads 

For inlormation 

call 924-5674 

For further information 

call 452-2824 



FIRST BAPTIST 

CHURCH OF PRINCETON 
at John St. ft Paul Robeson PI. 

Oasis Service: 8 a.m. Every Sunday 

Sunday Worship 11am. 

Sunday School: 930 a m 

Prayer Service Tuesday 7 p.m. 

Youth Fellowship: 4th Sunday. 6p.m 

Bible Study Wednesday 12:15 &7pm 

Office: 609-924-0877 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 

First Church of Christ, Scientist 

16 Bayard Lane, Princeton 

Visitors Welcome 

. 1 Child Care Available 

Sunday Services 
10:30 a.m. 

Sunday School for Children 

and Young People up to age 20 

10:30 a.m. 

Wednesday Evening 

Testimony Meetings 

7 30 p.m. 




Christian Science Reading Room 

178 Nassau Street, Princeton 

924-0919 

Mon-Sat 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. & Thurs. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m 




Sunday Worship: 9:30 and 1 1:00 a.m. 
Sunday School for all ages at 9:30 a.m. 

Dr. Rev. Mallhcw Riiluccia, St. Pastor 

David Rowc, Associate Pastor of Congregational (arc 

Grace Mathews. Director of Missions 

Mary McCormack. Director of Women's & Children'* Mini itlii 

From Rt. 206 (Stockton Si.) lake Elm Rd H/ltl mile. 

Turn right onto Westcrlv Ro.ul ' liun h is on Icll 



The Jewish Center 

435 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 
Telephone: 609-921-0100 

www.thejewishcenter.org 

Rabbi Dov Peretz Elkins 
Cantor Murray E. Simon 

Friday evening services at 6:30 p.m. 
Saturday services at 9:45 a.m. 

Religious School & Nursery Program • 921-7207 



Trinity Episcopal Church 

Crescent Ave., Rocky Hill, N.J. • 921-8971 (Office) 
Rev. Janet Johnson, Vicar 

Sunday School: 9:00 a.m. 
Sunday Services: 

Holy Eurcharist at 9:30 a.m. & 1 1:00 a.m. 
"All Are Welcome" 



LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE MESSIAH 

407 Nassau St. at Cedar Lane, Princeton • 924-3642 
Pastor, Rev. Dr. John Mark Goerss 

Sunday Morning Worship at 10:30 a.m. 
Sunday School & High School Youth Class at 9:00 a.m. 

Adult Bible Classes beginning 9/14 at 9:00 a.m. 
i Confirmation classes. Mondays at 6:30 p.m. 

Ql Choir Rehearsal: Thursdays at 8:00 p.m. 



Princeton United 
Methodist Church 

Cnr. Nassau St & Vandeventer Ave 

609-924-2613 

Gregory B Young. Senior Pauor 

SUNDAY SCHEDULE 

Worship 9 30am & 1 1 :00am 

(nursery cars prowtod) 

Churcti School 

9 30am a 1 1 00am 

MuB EaucaUon 

9 30ame 1140am 

Taan Choir 6-00 pm 

UMVF 615 pm 

All Are Welcome! Ql 



Unitarian 

Universalist 

Congregation 

off Princeton 



A liberal 
Religious Community 



Route 206 at Cherry HHI Roftd 

609-924-1604 

Sunday S ervio— 

9:16* 11 16 

child care pro*d*d 

Tha Rav Roc*rt Latham 

Th# Rav Onatr* F Raed 

www uupnrv-^ton org 



Join us at the Crossroads! 




PRINCETON 
ALLIANCE 



• Saturday w orship 6:00 p.m. 

•Sunday Worship 9:30 A 1 1 00a.m. 

•Nursery & Preschool programs 
.ii each hour 

•( hiisii.in edui ation Foi 
Adults A Children 
•Kids Kuh Church 
•Youth Worship 
•Singli I Iroups 
•Care Cin I 



CHCJRCH 'Counseling Center 

Rev. Robert R. Cushman, Senior I'astor 
P.O. BOX 9000, Plainsboro, NJ 08536 
609-799-9000 • www.paccma.org 

AT THE CROSSROADS ( 1 1 

S( 1 11)1)1 RS MILL & SCHALKS CROSSING 



TRINITY 
CHURCH 

J J Mercer Street, Prim clou, NJ 
l )24-2277 

Wprship 
Pastoral Csn 

Idm .i i 

Oulre.n Ii 



Leslie Smith, 
RECTOR 



SUNDAY SERVICES 
8:00,9:00 4 moo a.m. 

IN I- ANT/TODDLER CARE 
8:45-1 1:15 a.m. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL & 
FORUM HOUR 

l():00a.m. 

Learn more at: trinilyprinceton.orj» 



CHRIST CONGREGATION 

50 Walnut Lane • Princeton 
Jeffery Mays, Pastor • 921-6253 

Affiliated with the United Church of Christ 

and the 

American Baptist Churches. USA 

Worship Service at 10 a.m. J 

Fellowship at 1 1 a.m. 
Education Hour at 1 1 : 15 a.m. 




NASSAU PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

61 Nassau Street • Princeton • 924-0103 

(Ramp entrance on right side of building) 
www.nas$auchurch org 

8:00 a.m. Radio Broadcast 

(WHWH 1350 AM) 

9:15 a.m. Worship Service 

Church School for all ages 

1 1:00 a.m. Worship Service 

(child care is available) 
David A Davit, Pastor 
Lauren J McFeaters, Associate Pastor 
Marti Reed Hazclngg. Associate Pastor 
Joyce M.tcKichao Walker, Director of Christian Educatioa 
Kenneth Ii Kotky. Director of Mumc 

Sue Ellen Page, Director of Choirs for Children and Youth *L 

Maureen Franzen. Church Administrator V»_X 

"One generation shall praise your works to another... " Psalm I45>i 




<c/SrO 




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to place an order: 

tel: 924-2200 
fax:924-8818 

e-mail: 
classifieds@towntopics.com 



un 



CLASSIFIEDS 



The most cost effective way to reach our 30,000+ readers. 



LOVE SEAT FOR SALE: Bur- 
gundy with beige pattern Not new, 
just looks new' Asking $250 Interest- 
ed 9 Call Bruce 924-2643 and leave a 
message 10-8-21 

RUMMAGE SALE 

Paul Church Hall 
214 Nassau St Princeton. NJ 

Oct 16. 9-5. Fn Oct 17, 9-5. 
Sat Oct 18. 9-3 10-8-21 

RUMMAGE SALE: Princeton Ital- 
ian American Club Ladies Auxiliary 
Saturday. November 1.9-5 pm. and 
Sunday, November. 2, 9 - noon North 
Harrison, past Shopping Center, turn 
right on Terhune. 3rd left at Governors 
Lane. 1/2 mile up the road 10-8-2t 

PRINCETON: Desirable Washing- 
ton Oaks 2 plus bedrooms. 2 lull 
baths, two-story condo Full open 
concept loft, very bright with large 
windows and cathedral ceilings 
Hardwood flooring, new carpets, 
freshly painted balcony overlooking 
preserved green space Princeton 
schools. $329,000 Private sale No 
agents please (609) 430-9918 
10-8-2t 

HOUSECLEANING: We are serv- 
ing Mercer County We do service in 
houseB. condos. apartments, offices, 
child care, dental office and hair 
salons References available Own 
transportation Please call (609) 588- 
0849 leave message 10-8-2t 

FITNESS WORKSHOP: For wom- 
en Appreciating your body, posture, 
movement and more October 24 9 15 
- 1 1 00 am, ATA. 830 State Road. 
206. Princeton No prior exercise 
experience necessary for more infor- 
>n call 430-0200 or 
497- 1304^ 10-15 



FOR SALE: Sears Craftsman 10 HP 
ndmg lawn mower with 30* t/ailer 
lawn sweeper Best offer Call 
924-3795 10-15-21 

RUMMAGE A BAKE SALE: Tnn 

ity Church. Rocky Hill, Crescent Ave- 
nue off Rt 518 Saturday, October 25. 
8 30 - 3 pm $3 a bag after 
1230 10-15-21 

TAG SALE: Saturday, October 25, 
7 30 am 107 Philip Drive, Princeton 
Small antiques, bikes, books, chairs, 
clothes, historical collectibles, house- 
wares, children's vintage costumes, 
great fabrics, quilts and 
more 10-15-21 

LET US COOK: For your party' 
Any event, any occasion, for any 
amount of people Contact us at Mar- 
garitas Cuisine (609) 895-1435 or 
(609)947-3198 10-15-21 

PRINCETON BORO: Very large 
.one bedroom apt in charming 3 fam- 
ily house Porch, deck, large yard. 
Beautifully renovated Quiet tree-lined 
street One block to center of town. 
$1400/month Call Hal (609) 
688-8414 10-15-21 

ROOM BY ROOM: Interior painting 
available Call Sam for a quote 466- 
0479 ext 112 10-15-41 

NEED SOMETHING DONE? 

Interior/exterior painting, plumbing, 
carpentry, masonry and roofing Sem- 
inary graduate with lots of practical 
experience Also troubleshoot com- 
puters and networks References 
available 430-9218 10-i5-4t 

FOR EXPERIENCED 
GARDENER: And snow removal' 
Call anytime 921-6739 10-15 



MAPLE RUN STABLES: Stalls 
lessons, indoor arena, full-time care 
on premises Hillsborough. Call (908) 
369-2244 10-8-4t 

FIRM ABS w/out SORENESS: 

Reduce waist size without muscle 
fatigue Try Feidenkrais core muscle 
toning, which teaches safe and easy 
alternatives to crunches Instructor 
Michal Ben-reuven (609) 
924-2595 10-15-31 

HOUSE FOR LEASE: Princeton 
Boro Three bedroom, 2 baths, full 
basement $2700 month Call (609) 
510-1538 10-8-21 

PRINCETON TWP CAPE: Three 
bedrooms, basement, garage, W/D, 
dishwasher Central to town and 
shopping center $2000/month plus 
utilities Call 695-6901 10-8-2t 

HOUSE FOR RENT: Hopewell. 2 
bedroom, large yard, off-street park- 
ing Some childcare (13 year old) for 
reduced rent (2 days/wk after school). 
Call 258-4942 or brooksgu® 
prmceton edu 1 0-8-2t 

GARAGE SALE: Saturday October 
15, Raindate Sunday 8 - 2 pm Men's 
bicycle, books, small furniture, kitchen 
stuff, clothing, plastic garden chairs, 
greeting cards, dishes, glasses and 
more 28 Cedar Lane. Princeton 10-15 

APARTMENT FOR RENT: Avail 
able immediately 3 blocks from Nas- 
sau Street Bedroom, bath, kitchen & 
living room Private entrance. No pets. 
Parking available. $1025/month. Call 
(609)587-1932 10-15 

CARPENTER TOOLS: Will give 
price on unwanted carpenter tools. 
Call 921-9522 10-15-41 



Polly Burlingham, Classified Manager 



EXTREME YARD SALE: 57 Ran- 
dall Road, off Terhune Saturday. 10/ 
18,9-3 pm NO EARLY BIRDS' Ram- 
date. Sun. 10/19. Books, clothing, 
collectibles, furniture, linens, kitchen- 
ware, hardware, including bathroom 
smk' Snowboard and boots size 9 
Kids bring your quarters. Lots of 
goodies' 10-15 

KINGSTON YARD SALE: Satur- 
day. October 18. 8- 2 pm. The New 
School tor Music Study. 4543 Route 
27 (Main Street) at the corner of Shaw 
and Mam. Ram date October 19 Not 
)ust another yard sale! 200 family 
school Lots of items books, house- 
wares (china, glass, cookware), 
Christmas decor, furniture, toys, 
games, travel gear, sports equipment, 
large collection ol classic vinyl and 
78s, computer equipment, typewnt- 
ers Free coffee and donuts 10-15 

HOPEWELL BOROUGH: Corpo- 
rate or personal lurnished one bed- 
room, LR. 1 balh apartment in charm- 
ing restored Victorian home minutes 
from Princeton. Hardwood floors, fully 
equipped EIK. utilities, central air. 
local phone, cable TV. laundry, use of 
pool all included in $1800/month rent. 
Off street parking, minimum 6 month 
lease. Call (609) 466-7874 1 0- 1 

STATIONARY BIKE: Computerize 
with film. Enjoy summer activity all 
winter long. $150 Call (609) 
771-1180 10-15 

PRINCETON STREET SALE: 

Moore Street neighborhood yard sale, 
Saturday, October 18. 8 - 2 pm. Rain 
date October 19 Wide variety of 
items from many families Moore is off 
Nassau by St Paul's Church. Sale 
starts past High School to end of 
Moore 10-15 



CLASSIFIED RATE INFO: 



• Deadline: 2pm Tuesday • Payment: All ads must be pre-paid, Cash, credit card, or check. • 30 words or less: $10.00 

• each add'l word 10 cents • Surcharge: $15.00 for ads greater than 60 words in length • e-mailAvebsite address: 
$1.00 each • 3 weeks: $27.00 • 4 weeks: $35.00 • 6 weeks: $ 50.00 • 6-month and annual discount rates available 

'Ads with line spacing: $13.00/ inch • all bold face type: $6. 00/wk • change orders: $5. 00 i 




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4 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08542 • 609-921-1050 



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1.32 acres — $1,000,000 



1.21 acres — $750,000 



Prime Borough Lots 



Two of the last opportunities to build in Princeton Borough's 
Western Section are now available. These adjacent lots are 
pre-approved, with public water and sewer available. 

Once part of a luxuriantly landscaped estate, they are close to 
all that town offers. 



www.ntcallaway.com 



EXCLUSIVE AFFILIATE OF 

Sotheby's 

INTERNATIONAL REALTY 



VISIT AN 
ARM OF 
HOSPITAL 
FOR SPECIAL 
SURGERY 
ONLY 
FROM THE 
PRINCETON 
AIRPORT. 



Hospital for Special Surgery has been top ranked in 
its fields of musculoskeletal care for 13 consecutive 
years. Our world -renowned specialists at the Affiliated 
Physician Office in Princeton offer medical diagnosis, 
non-surgical management of injuries and joint pain, 
x-rays, and EMG testing. 

So, if you're suffering from bone, joint, or muscle 
problems, get a first class evaluation without the pain of 
going into the City. Call 609.683.5500. For more 
information, visit our Hospital Web site at www.hss.edu 
and click on Maps and Directions. 

389 Wall Street (off Route 206), 
Princeton, NJ 08540. 



GARAGE SALE: Annual huge sale 
at 165 Clover Lane. Pnnceton Satur- 
day October 18th. 8 - 3 pm Kids 
clothes, furniture, books, antiques, 
sewing machine, unique items NOT 
TO BE MISSED' 10-15 

YARD SALE: Sunday. October 19. 
9 - 1 pm Ramdate, October 25 
Housewares (some new), china, rug, 
furniture, baby gear. toys, bikes 
books, aquarium etc Bird and gerbil 
supplies and more 23 Greenview 
Ave (off Wiggins Street near 
cemetery) 10-15 

HUGE GARAGE SALE: Tools, 
kitchen/bath cabinets, building sup- 
plies and more Sponsored by Habitat 
for Humanity Saturday, 10- 18 Irom 9 
- 4 pm Trenton, corner of Olden and 
Clinton Avenues 10-15 

HOUSECLEANINQ SERVICES: 

Very trustworthy, over 15 years expe- 
nence Excellent references Let us 
make your house shine 1 Contact Mar- 
garet at (609) 895-1435 or (609) 
947-3198 10-15 

SALE BY APPT. ONLY: Sat. 10/ 
18. Sun 10/19 Assorted decorative 
obiects. art, antiques, furn . luggage, 
King-size bedspread, microwave and 
other items. Lv message (609) 924- 
7907(212)535-0900 10-15 

APT. FOR RENT: 2 BR. private 
entrance Newly remodeled kitchen 
and bath Fireplace, dishwasher, air- 
conditioning, W/D. patio $1600/ 
month all utilities included No smok- 
ing, no pets (609) 924-6779 
Available October 10-8-2t 

SLIPCOVERS and other home fur- 
nishings. Indulge your imagination or 
stick to the basics Miranda Short 
(609)921-1908 8-6- 26T 



AT LAST, 

Exquisite, Luxurious Living in Yardley, PA 



HOUSECLEANINQ: Experienced, 
dependable, good references, and 
own transportation Please call Veron- 
ica (609) 393-9648 or (609) 
977-0805 9-17-3t 



HOSPITAL 
FOR 

SPECIAL 
SURGERY 



HOSPITAL FOR SPECIAL SURGERY IS 
AN AFFILIATE OF NEWYORK-PRESBYTERIAN 
HEALTHCARE SYSTEM AND WEILL MEDICAL 
COLLEGE OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

Specialists 
in Mobility 



Recycling 

MONDAY 

For 
Borough 

and 
Township 





An exquisite Single I .n ml \ 1 1. mi. 
i oiiiuuiiiK) l>\ I >( I ut .i Homes 
featuring 3600 to 40004 iquaiC feet 
of luxury living from the $600,000'a 
in Yardley, PA. 

For more Information, 
call (215) 3694466 

I >ir« i i I 'A N.«iil New Hope/ 

\ mill 1 Make ■ rijgfti 11 '• 00m ■ il ihi 1 imp 

towards Vaidley P 1 "> «j«& to Dolington 

Rd. Make 1 righl Sal ■ r» l la located 1/8 
mil. ..11 ill. right hand Id 

Sale* Office Hour* Sunday 11 
Monday 12 \ Ibi day Saturday 10 5 



IHOKtHSWUCOMl 



DeLuca 

HOMES 

www delui ib< inn ■ ■ • »m 

Home At Last 



O 2003 D.liM. Horn.. 



I3r 

WWW? 



Prudential New Jersey Properties 



SOUTH BRUNSWICK — Historically signifi- 
cant 3 story home with 3 bedrooms & 3.5 baths, 
has been known as Kings Cram Farm. This stun- 
ning stone home has stood for decades and is still 
today an incredibly warm home with architectural 
balance, charm and practicality. This is truly a 
magnificent homestead. 
#805-03-010-03* $599,900 




MONTGOMERY TWP. — Lovely 3 1/2 year 
young Townhome, 3 bedrooms & 2.S baths in Mont- 
gomery Hills. Featuring neutral decor & many 
upgrades. Enjoy wooded backyard from the deck or 
an extra high walk out basement. 
#805-03-09.033 $349,000 



MONTGOMERY TWP. — This l.mi.i .lie new LAWRENt I. I Wl\ — Recently cxtcnsivcl 

Townhome is ready!! A spacious and well planned valcd ranch IWrlU wiih mon tOOIII 10 j'.row. Newer 

dream home loaded with premium fututCI [Till Mechanicals & appliance*. AC, plumbing, scplic & 

home backs to a lush wooded and protected private well work. 

space. Truly a home you have to walk through and #805-03-09.035 $525,000 

sec 

#805-03-09-032 $428,700 





■ 



mm. 



PRINCETON BORO — First floor commercial / HILLSBOROUGH —Well established family restau- 

retail space wiih full basement. 3 bathrooms, highly rant since 1962. Lot with frontage on Route 206 & side 

visible location in downtown Princeton. street SOMER VILLE BORO — I his home has an over- 

#805-03-008-024 SI 1.250 / month #805-03-07-018 $1,000,000 si/cd I car garage with loft storage New 

furnace, water healer, gutters & 1st floor carpeting. 

#805-03-09-034 $240,000 



yii4ri4Lfi 



MONTGOMERY — CUSTOM COLONIAL 
WITH < APE FLAIR. Ikauliful 2 year young 
li. mi. featuring many amenities including: two- 
story foyer, custom arches, hardwood & tile floors, 
kitchen with center island and gourmet applu 
Plus 5 mahogany decks. 
•K0S- 03-07-004 $774,900 




I'Kl'IH \ll\l IrVKHSITI 

ivww.PruNewJersey.coni 



wfe Prudential 



New Jersey Properties 



PRINCETON 01 I l( I . 1.38 Nassau Street, Princeton - II LlvPHONJ : 1100 130-1288 

>g ttffiee* \, r mi ' Northern and Cenlrnl \t >t tei set In ludepeudealh Owned K « )fM ruled V* iiihi > <>/ I !>• i'i iil> uliul Ketd l ./n/' \Hiliuiei Ini 



. 



KM LIGHT 

Real Estate 

245 Nassau Street 

Princeton 

924-3822 



Lamp Shades 
Lamp Repairs 



Custom-made Lamps 

NASSAU INTERIORS 




ARE YOU LOSING MONEY 

During Your Home Negotiations? 

Arc you about lo buy/sel! a house, 

car, boat, or other significant asset? 

We will help you put your money back in your pocket. 

Professional Negotiators lor Individuals 

One Stop Home Solutions • 609-620-1768 

email: oncstophomesolutionsftvearthlink.net 

"Life just f>ol a I idle fa sic r. " 




than you 
^expec t 



SUSAN 



Gordon 

SALES ASSOCIATE 

609.921. 14 11. xt. 1 22 

OFFICE DIRECT 

609-688-4813 

coldwellbankcrmuves.com 
princetonreelestate.net 




coLouieu. 

BANKCRU 



HIIAI hNlHCllH',1 



151 



•TOO) CaOw* flank*/ Cctpuatan OvMmH Bar*** i, * im/i—a UMmM d 
tax ant Opwmi fr, NRI nuvpyaM 



PRINCETON: 2 bedroom duplex JOE'S LANDSCAPE, INC.: All 

house close to town New eat-m Men- phases of spring cleanup, shrub 
en. bathroom, d.nmg room, living pruning, fertilizing, mulching, weed 
room, deck A/C parting, shared control, leal cleanup, lawn cutting 
•-'age. No pets, no smok- Also, rototilling Call anytime. (609) 
ing $l540/month plus ut.iit.es (609) 924-0310. leave message tfc 

. 27 » 17n !2±3 CASH PAID FO« ANTIQUES: 

WOULD WAN II: Pad-time person Buying: paintings, rugs, clocks. 
to organize my World War ll paper lamps, sterling, quilts, weapons, nau- 
memorabrtia Work in my home m tical. mens jewelry Oak. walnut and 
basement Call (609) 924-0243 mahogany furniture Also buying 

10-l-3t books, magazines, travel posters. 

prints, postcards, and old advertising 

RENTAL: Mam house on superb Fair market value for house contents 
horse farm minutes from Princeton/ Reasonable rates for managing 
Hopewell 5 BR. 5 BA. gourmet coun- estate sales If you're moving, down- 
try krtcnen, spacious and rambling, sizing, or have any questions call 
great for entertaining, circa 1745, Gerald F. Joseph, Sr at (732) 846- 
excellent condition Huge fenced 1515 or (732) 485-1710 All inquiries 

yard, use of pool Stalls/indoor ring/ are confidential if 

trainer at your fingertips $4000/ 

month Call Barbara Dressier. We.dei PRINCETON BOROUGH: Single 
Realtors. Princeton (609) family home, 3 bedroom, 15 bath. Iiv- 
921-2700 10-1-3t , ng room, dining room. 2-car parking 

furnished in PRINCETON- area Walklf1 9 stance to University 
FURNISHED IN PRINCETON. Nq Avai | ab | e now $1,500 plus 

^X'fno f' ve : S,de afea , D 3 ut.lit.es Call in evening (609) 
BR. 2 5. BA. DR, family room. LR, 904.1788 10-15-3. 

garage Walk to University Lease ■ 

$2500/month Available now (609) PRIVATE FLUTE LESSONS: 
924-3744 or (703) 292-4868 or (202) Barbara Highton Williams' Flute Stu- 

667-6723 10-1-3' dio announces additional teaching 

hours New students now welcome 
All levels, all ages from 9 up. Call 
(609)921-3041 10-15-3t 



1990 HONDA CIVIC: Gray hatch- 
back Some dents but m excellent 

running condition New brakes, 
exhaust system, radiator and tires 
Gets excellent mileage Perfect stu- 
dent car hauls a ton and fits into any 
parking space $800 obo Call (609) 
258-4470 anytime 10-15 

THRIFT SALE: Princeton United 
Methodist Church. Nassau Street at 
Vandeventer Avenue 5 - 8 pm, Thurs 
October 16. 9 - 5 pm Fn , Oct 17. 

and 9 -1 pm Sat , Oct. 18 Clothing. 
shoes, jewelry, accessories house- 
wares, light furniture, books. CDs. 
tapes, videos, electronics, linens 
Many infant and toddler items All m 
good to excellent condition Saturday 
Bag Sale Day $3 10-15 

GARAGE SALE: Sat October 18. 
8 30 am. (no early birds please) 
Toys, furniture, household goods, 
kids stuff. 129 Linwood Circle. Princ- 
eton Directions: Snowden to 
Leabrook to Lmwood 10-15 



PSYCHOTHERAPIST: Accept- 
ing new clients, adults, adolescents 
Specializing in depression, anxiety, 
relationship issues Many insurances 
accepted Princeton area For 
appointment call Ed Thibodeau. 
LCSW at 609-430-9301 Directions 
www EdwardThibodeau com 

tf-10-8-26t 






YARD SALE: EXTRAORDINAIRE! 
Moving after 20 years in this 200 year 
old home! Imagine what we found to 
sell! Some antiques Everything from 
clothes, gardening tools, beautiful 
carved wood frame sofa, ladders, 
lawn tractor, roto-tiller and lots of spe- 
cial (and regular) small stuff Sat and 
Sun 9 - 5 pm. 333 Dutchtown Zion 
Road. Skillman. NJ (near the intersec- 
tion with Pin Oak) 10-15 

YARD SALE: Saturday, 10/18. 9 -1 
pm at 192 Loomis Court between 
Valley Road and Terhune off Walnut 
Lane Rocking chairs, antiques chest 
and other stuff 10-15 



Recycling 

MONDAY 

For 
Borough 

and 
Township 



BEEN A JUROR RECENTLY? If 

you have served within the last 2 
years and are willing to answer a con- 
fidential, mail-m questionnaire aboul 
the experience, contact Rider Univer- 
sity professor. Dr Heath at (609) 895- 
5425 or at heath@nder edu. Volun- 
teers will receive $5 10-15-3t 



'72 YELLOW VW BEETLE: With 
antique license plates and insurance 
is for sale tor $1800 or best offer at 
Hollywood Garage. Garfield Avenue 
in Lawrenceville 10-15 




4 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08542 (609) 921-1050 



architectural design of this handsome Colonial is a blending of elegant graciousness and 
family comfort, with spacious rooms for formal entertaining, those for family fun. In the 
stunning ( ireal Room, with clerestory windows, deep rich moldings and wood floor, a marble 
fireplace is d d on a wall and framed by recessed custom cabinetry. Classic 

pillars introdui i mal dining room. The family room has a peaked ceiling and hardwood 

f l .... i in. I overlooks the well-appointed kitchen, with granite counters, center island, ceramic 
tile floor, and breakfast area. A master bedroom, with bay window and glamorous bath, and a 
bedroom/study and full bath complete this level. Upstairs, two bedrooms, each with bath, a 
bedroom opening to a hall bath and an additional bedroom. A fully finished basement offers a 
remarkable flooi plan o\ its own with individual rooms for media entertainment, exercise, 
games, bobbies, and B secluded office, and full bath. Outside, majestic trees and the pleasures 
oJ a U nm I Olirt, stone fireplace for outdoor picnics and a playhouse. In a quiet, out-of-the way 
ill i hi iImhhI in Lawrenceville. $1,150,000 

Marketed by Diane Kilpatrick 





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,m 


iff ^ 

i iiin »™5 ii 





www.ntcallaway.com ^^ 



EXCLUSIVE AFFILIATE OF 

Sotheby's 

INTERNATIONAL REALTY 



Robert Wells 

Tree & Landscape Inc. 

All Phases of Tree & Shrub Care 

Tree & Stump Removal 

Double Ground Hardwood Mulch 

Drainage Work 

fjtw v*** Deer Fencing 

S^^i Walkways & 

Patio Installation 

All credit cards accepted Call: 452-8733 




E'Z Construction Design 

For all your home improvement needs 

Finish Basements 

Kitchen & Bath Remodeling 

Marble & Ceramic Tiles 

Carpentry & Painting 

Reasonable Rates! 

Call for free estimate 732-438-6905 



OBI 

aytWrn aoMion* 

Sates and Senice 

• Computet Rcpak 

• Networionj Home 1 BuwtM 

• Cable and W Installation 

• Data Rsconerr 

OM System Solutions 

lei 609-683-0060 



DEU-HHBM Dealer 



Low prices and 
Superior service 
In-Store or On-site repair 
Free pick up and delivery 
Free Pnone Support 
A* Certified Technicians 

Open 9am-6pm Mon-Fri 
Saturday 10am-2pm 

41 5 Wall Street 
Princeton, NJ 08540 





■ 
JAMES 
IRISH TREE EXPERTS 

• Shade tree pruning and trimming 

• Tree and stump removal 

• Tree fertilizing 

• Quality service & good prices 



924-3470 



N.J. Certified Expert No. 301 



O'Hern Works 
Custom Paperaanging 

Commercial & Residential 




609.466.7875 

MC/Vim Accepted 



u I hern 




Hopewell, N, 



PRINCETON'S ONE-STOP WONDER! 
A 




eaSS* e^E 






PRINCETON 






SHOPPING'CENTER 




50 FINE STORES & RESTAURANTS 



609-921-6234 

301 N. Harrison St. • Princeton, NJ i 



Gloria Nilson 

REALTORS 



f A GMAC 
li 




Real Estate 




PRINCETON — A Home in the Best Princeton Tradition framed by tall 
trees on over 2 acres located in the much sought after Pretty Brook area, 
offers the discerning buyer a unique opportunity to have the best of both 
worlds, the tranquility of country living with the proximity to 
town. $1,750,000 

Marketed by Margaret "Maggie" Hill 




HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP — On over 2 acres, this custom contemporary 
with a traditional feel, has 3-4 bedrooms, 4 full baths, and 2 powder rooms. 
Top-of-the-line kitchen, breakfast room with doors to deck, see through fire- 
place, master suite on the first floor. Ttiis home is elegant and 
comfortable. $995,000 

Marketed by Marcia Graves 




MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP — A lovely and gracious five bedroom 
and 3 1/2 bath home framed by mature trees with an open and flexible floor 
plan. Wonderful for sophisticated entertaining and yet comfortable for fam- 
ily living. Minutes from downtown Princeton with a Princeton 
address. $739,000 

Marketed by Ellen Lefkowitz 



PRINCETON — Located in Princeton's Edgerstoune, one of the area's best 
builders is starting a thoughtful rebuilding project on B wonderful, quiet lot. 
Approximately 4000 square feel of well appointed space Call today for floor 
plan and specifications. $1,850,000 

Marketed by Ruth Sayer 




MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP — This Federal period home has been 
completely renovated by the meticulous owners. Architect designed wing 
blends beautifully with original amenities of the house. Gleaming wide pine 
floors, deep set windows, three fireplaces and three floors of living provide a 
warmth and charm rarely found. Four car garage, with adjoining studio, 
lovely grounds, deck and pool. $945,000 

Marketed by Eleanor (Peggy) Hughes 




PRINCETON — Cozy Cape, 3 bedroom, 2 bath, maintenance-free exterior. 
Lovely screcned-in porch off kitchen. TV room adjoins the living room. 
Move-in condition. Directions: Route 206 north to left on Hillside 
Avenue. $342,000 

Marketed by Aone Sterling 



01 
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E B ' N C E I Q ^ 



£ E F I C E 



33 Witherspoon Street - Princeton, New Jersey 08542 
Tel: (609) 921 -2600 Fax: (609) 921 -3299 

http://www.glorianllton.com http://www.eleganthomes.ofg http.7ftwww.gmacreale8tate.com 



» r— 



Designing Kitchens for People who Cook 

Cdl Georgie Skover.CKD. for an Aooontment 

Princeton. New Jersey Phone 609.497 0935 
view our rxrtfofo at vvww.cjsdesicrinet 



Hinkson's 

Filing Cabinets 
Computer Paper 

82 Nassau St., 
Princeton 
924-0112 



PRINCETON: 

This MAGNIFICIENT MANOR 
HOME IS COMPLETE AND 
READY FOR YOU' Situated on 
over 3 acres in the most desir- 
able Rushbrook Section, this 
home has 7 bedrooms, 7 full and 
3 half baths. It has a spectacular 
gourmet kitchen, a fabulous fin- 
ished basement with a recre- 
ation area, exercise area, wet 
bar with wine cellar, 1 1/2 bath. 
and 3rd floor finished with its 
own great room, 2 bedrooms and full bath. 4 fireplaces, Brazil- 
ian cherry hardwood floors, custom cabinets and closets, and 
more upgrades than you can imagine. Call Phyllis at 609-720- 
4185(direct) or 609-452-1887 for the full list of inclusions, 
upgrades and floor plans! $4,950,000 




^^Vof Princeton 



Your Realtor of Choice • RE/MAX ot Princeton 

609-452-1887 

pgrodnickiOyahoo.com 

visit my web site af www phylhsgrodnicki com 

f.00 Alex.irifJf'i Road, PrinC#tOn, NJ 08550 Ssflhotl iMtepsndtontlyOwnstfandCpsrBttd 





NEED TO RENT? 

Princeton Township: Charming 3 
bedroom. 3 bath house available m 
the Institute Area Full basement. 2 
car garage and Johnson Park 
Schools Available immediately 
$4000 

Montgomery: Brand new 3 bed- 
room. 2 5 bath townhouse in Mont- 
gomery Walk 1 car garage, washer 
and dryer, soaking tub. full basement, 
dreplace are some of the features m 
this beautiful townhouse. Available 
immediately $2600 

Lawrence (Provlncolino Road): 

Spacious recently renovated 3 bed- 
room. 2 bath ranch on large lot Avail- 
able immediately Beautiful family 
room, kitchen and large living room, 
central air. w/d. and two car garage. 
$2650 

Pennington: Beautiful larmhouse 
with original wide plank wood floors, 
several fireplaces, tack room, sun 
filled kitchen, large living room, 
library, dining room, formal foyer, and 
4 bedrooms available on over 4 acres 
m the heart of Elm Ridge Park $4000 

Pennington: Spacious 2 bedroom, 
i 5 bath cape with plenty of light, 
parking and space Available immedi- 
aiely $1600 

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

Listing, Renting, Managing 

Call Matt Henderson 
(609) 924-10O0 

Princeton Real Estate Group 

199 Nassau Street 

Princeton, NJ 08540 

princatonrealestategroup.com 

10-15-lf 

EVERYBODY'S THERE: And 

now. so are we www towntopics com 



AFFORDABLE HOUSING: 

Princeton Boro 
Moderate income affordable housing 
unit available for rent. One loft bed- 
room, one bathroom Parking and 
central heat and air 55 plus age 
requirement and income restnctions 
apply Contact Weinberg Manage- 
ment Co (609) 924-8535 
10-01 

HOUSE FOR RENT: Handsome 
brick home with large, bright rooms. 
Quiet Princeton location, charming 
fireplace, two car garage Very attrac- 
tive rent Call (609) 924-7273 busi- 
ness days or (609) 466-1718 
evenings/weekends 10- "5 

MOVING SALE: Saturday. October 
18. 8 am Furniture, tables, chairs, 
bedroom set, WW II army issue foot- 
locker, toys, kitchen items, lamp, tools 
and more 41 Chestnut Street. Prince- 
ton Ramdate Sunday. 10/19 

10-15 

FAUX FINISHES: Expertly per- 
formed for your walls, trim, ceilings, 
floors, furniture Call Sam for a quote. 
466-0479 ext 112. 10-15-4t 

CAPE MAY RENTAL: New Victo- 
rian close to beach, shops and res- 
taurants, on Columbia Ave , sleeps 
6-8, wrap-around porch, central A/C 
Call 609-924-2761 for more 
information 10-1-6t 

FRENCH TUTORS AVAILABLE: 

For adults and children. Custom 
classes arranged to meet your level 
from beginner to advanced Perma- 
nent American residents Native 
speakers with many years teaching 
experience Can work in your home or 
ours Call Mary (609) 
936-0513 10-01-61 

FALL LEAF CLEANUP: No long 
term contracts needed If you need 
some help, please call Serenity Land- 
scaping (609) 452-8230 10-15-41 



ONE BEDROOM APT.: For one 

person Quamt sunny, furnished sec- 
ond floor of in-town private house 
Dishwasher, fireplace, parking No 
smoking, no pets $975 including utili- 
ties 497-1909 9-17-31 

CELLO FOR SALE: German. 19th 
century $1200 negotiable Clothes 
steamer (professional) upright $50. 
Call Joan (609) 497-6409 9- 1 7-3t 

HAS TECHNOLOGY LEFT YOU 

BEHIND? Learn to operate a com- 
puter with ease PC or Mac Call Gen- 
tleTECH (908) 359-5369 or 
gentle iech@verizon net. 9-17-3t 

HOUSECLEANING: Sole propri- 
etorship since May 1975 Excellent 
references Own transportation 
English speaking Thorough cleaning 
of your home Expert care of silver 
Flat rate for basic cleaning Extra $ for 
extras (609) 799-5209 9-17-31 

INSTRUCTOR • ESL: Conversa- 
tional and cultural mentor to the Princ- 
eton area. Customized classes from a 
certified teacher Call Adam at (609) 
924-9551 9-24-2t 

LIVE-IN CARE AVAILABLE: 

Experienced, skilled mature male 
(non-smoking) ready to provide live-in 
care for an elderly person Available 
now Excellent references Call John 
at (813) 903-8377 (leave 
message) 10-0l-3t 

DIGITAL PIANO: Technics model 
SXPX332M walnut - like new - excel- 
lent "piano" sound Many features, 
$1200 Call (609) 430-1804 10-1 

TOWNHOUSE FOR SALE: Princ- 
eton Junction - Windsor Ponds Brand 
new, never lived in. 3 BR. 2 5 BA. 
Belmont Model. 1927 sq ft. premium 
location, 2 story family room with fire- 
place. Overlooks woods Designer's 
master bath with jacuzzi Priced to 
sell $389,000 by owner. (609) 275- 
6392 Open House Saturday. 1 - 
5pm. 10-01 




RtCallawa/ 

Real Estate Broker.L lc *J 

Four Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08542 




Princeton — Impeccable renovations update the gracious ambiance of this 
attractive home. Custom kitchen, lovely garden. New Price. $499,000 



www.ntcallaway.com 



609 921 1050 




Princeton — An architect designed contemporary with versatile floor plan, 

beautiful views — on the serine ridge, bordered by 40 preserved 

acres. $799,000 



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Montgomery Twp. — This Traditional features elegant open spaciousness, 
gourmatjejtchen. Elevator accessible to all 3 levels. 




Montgomery — A new stone facade, stone-walled borders and lush land- 
scaping define the property of this graciously maintained 
Colonial. $745,000 




Princeton— The finesse ol tlu finish) s in this bri< I ( gian, built at the 

lum-of-the-20" century, are heightened l>\ -.n | »• il» m . - m i< novations. 




Princeton — Expand or build your dream house whie living here. 4+ 

— one of the last lots of this size and beauty in the Township. $850,000 



Judith McCaughan 
Willa Stackpole 
Barbara Blackwell 
Olive Westervelt 
Anne Williams 
Candice Walsh 
Norman Callaway, Jr. 
Florence Dawes 
Colleen Hall 



Gail Eldridge 
Cheryl Goldman 
Ralph Runyon 
Marilyn Durkee 
Maura Mills 
Diane Kilpatrick 
Gary Kilpatrick 
Christopher Tivenan 
Ann Galbraith 



Elizabeth Brian 
Valerie Young 
Robin McCarthy 
Judith Matthies 
Mcrlene Tuckci 
Susan Cook 
Bonnie M. Wilson 
David Schure 
Vicki Irmen 



NORMAN "FETE" CALIJVWAY, 
BROKER 

( hristine McGann, Exec. AflSt. 
Pamela Parsons, Mktg. Dir. 
Nell Duncan, Advertising 

CALLAWAY COMMERCIAL 
Tim Norris 

PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 
Dianne Bleacher 
Karen Urisko 
CALLAWAY MANAGEMENT 
Jerome A. Wig, RPA 



EXCLUSIVE AFFILIATE OF 

Sotheby's 

INTERNATIONAL REALTY 



• ANTIQUE I FOm SALEi ONE DAY FURNISHED HOUSE FOW HEWT 

• ONLY' Some 18th century Priced to Available 11/16/03 to 04/21/04 Walk 
•p sell Walnul corner cupboard, to everything Charming, quwl. 'uMy 



Idropleal cherry table, child's lire- equipped, bedroom, study, fireplace 
• house Windsor, 20 drawer oak cat>- W/D, parking No smohmg, no pets 
^•net. chairs, rugs, prints and much Best for single or couple 
^•more Saturday. October 18, 9 - 4 pm month plus utilises 
K 342 Nassau Street, corner of Harrison 924-9259 
2 Street. Princeton 



ABE YOU 
PftlMCCTOM: T*o rooms (or rent stand tall, improve posture, feel 
sma!VS450 00. large/S650 00 Share younger, increase flexibility and bal- 
bath. living, dmmg, and kitchen wrth ance Try relaxerose- you will learn to 
one other Cable m each room move with agility that gym workouts 
$1*600/ Washer/Dryer Includes utilities don't provide Instructor Mtchal Ben- 
(609) 430-9218 10-15-21 reuven (609) 924-2595 10-15-31 

10-15 



10-15 



PA IMC ETON »ORO ATT; 
£ MULTI-FAMILY SALE: 37 Hillside rent One block from Nassau Slreet 
B Avenue, off 206. Princeton October and campus 2 bedrooms with hard 
- 18th. 10 4 pm (Ramdale. October wood floors, kitchen, bath, central an 
C 19) Chinese antiques, household backyard paiio SlSOO/month plus 
B items, pamtmqs. books. CD's Pro- ut I Available 
■ creds to benefit Deer Pa-* ii'wtmber 1 Call (609) 
E Monastery 10-15 2529250 10-15 



CLEANING SERVICE: We ser HOUSECLEANIMQ: Two women 
Fof vice houses, apartments. ollices We \ clean your house or apartment We 



have excellent references, great have our own transportation and ref- 
expenence and are really response erences Over ten years experience 
ble Call Eia (609) 393-6169 or (609) Free estimate Call Lydia (609) 
439-7525 1Q-1S-21 540^)812 10-15-3t 



j YARD SALE: Princeton 20 HffDfl HOME HEALTH AIOE: 

.ton Avenue. Saturday. October 18, for your loved one Certified i 
-iRa.ndat. enced Pioase call (609) rudiments to rock jazz Beginners to 



DRUM LESSONS: For you or your FURNISHED ROOM: For rent Pri- 
st my 25 years teaching and vale bath and entrance. One mile 
performing experience help guide 'rom center of Princeton Call (609) 

Will are you through a positive and rewarding 924-3721 10-15 

learning process Drum and drurnsel, 



(Oys. 

K household, planer attachment, frame 893-7527 
-molding slice/ (Delia, lun 

I sale' 10-15 



TWO AFTS FOR RENT: One BR 



FOR SALE: Small wood and coal 
burning stove for sale S80 firm 
£ FURNISHED ROOM: ion Large, very nice carpenter tool 

■ pair needed $95 

■ n Call 921-9522 10-15 

-• r $490/rr-. Call 






j advanced Bob Schmidt. Princeton and 2 . Bfi 
Township (609) 668-9097 



, 48 Birch Avenue. Pnnce- 
10-1-31 ,on Near nos P lIal and university 

C ontact Eddie (973) 

Lovmg 445-6233 10-15-31 




f/&(v/wh as 



KITTEN NEEDS HOME: 

home wanted for female black and „__.„,__ _, mmmmm - 
white tuxedo Three months old. Has VOCAKIDS CLASSES: For ages 
Will pay lor spay Call 6 " 10 of,ered b V Sim P'y Yo 9 a aI 
CQ&Q05Q iO-1-3t K,n 9 s1on Ma "' Rl 27 N evef y Thurs- 

— day. 4 - 5 pm learn yoga through 

music, games, props, and yoga pos- 
es Call 924-7751 
www simplyyogakingston com 10-15- 
3t 

ART STUDIO FOR RENT: Sec- 
ond lloor, light, quiet and parking 
$270/month Call 921-0813 10-15-31 

OFFICE FOR RENT: Mam Street. 

Kingston, Post Oltice building Three 
rooms, plus or minus 750 sq ft Land- 
lord pays heal, tenant pays electric 
Available immediately $800/month 
(609)466-2012 10-15-31 




OIL PAINTING CLASSES: Learn 

'■'e c ass :a' c I panting techniques 
Space »s rrrmted. classes start soon. 
For more information call Tom at (609) 
203-8658 9-10-4t 

SCHOOL TUTOR: Johns Hopkins 
degree in Psychology and Princeton 
University Pn D provides quaJilied 
instruction in all subjects K-12. writing 
& college applications Excellent ref- 
erences Flexible scheduling Afford- 
able rates Please call Samantha 
(609)688-0711 9-10-4t 

PICK YOUR OWN APPLES : 

Pick your own Terhune Orchards on 
Van Kirk Road. Lawrence Township 
Open every day September and 
October. 9 - 5 pm 924-2310 
www terhuneorchards com 9-10-4t 

JEWELS BY JULIANA: Pearl re- 
slnngmg by Juliana "herself*, who 
has 25 years experience If other 
repairs needed, happy to assist you 
Please call (908) 431-0118 or email 
jewelsbyi@yahoo com 9-10-4t 

STORAGE SPACE: Heated and 
air-conditioned 900 sq ft Princeton 
Junction $500/month Call (609) 
799-1365 9-17-3t 

MERCEDES FOR SALE: 2002 
Peppy 4 door C240 Mercedes Cran- 
berry Charcoal leather interior, auto- 
matic Under dealer warranty 
$21.500. Call (609) 924-4940 9-17-31 

COTTAGE IN WOODS: Princeton 
Township Large living Area w/ 
sleeping loft. Semi-turmshed Utilities 
included Available now $1200/ 
month Call (609) 924-276 1 9- 1 7-3t 



HOPEWELL COMMERCIAL: 

Broad StreeL Forme/ basement with 

outside entrance m back of "Failte" 
coffee shop 3 rooms. 600 plus sq. ft 
$700 plus utilities (First year no NNN 
with 3 year contract) Call (609) 
466-0732 10-8-61 

UNCLASSIFIED CLASSIFEDS: 

TOWN TOPICS' idea of finding a 
quarter while looking for a dime 
Here's another idea TOWN TOPICS 
on line www townlopics.com 



t\WET PAPER 
56 IN THE 
DRIVEWAY? 

Sorry. It Happens, 



5 



6 



even with a plastic bag. 

We can't 

control the weather, 

but we can offer you 

a free, fresh and dry 

replacement paper 

if you stop by 

our office at 

4 Mercer Street. 



.y/ Went i&HMuL 'JcTwet, &&/>ewc/£> 6tW-?6b-Z<J()0 



MULCH • TOPSOIL • COMPOST 

Wholesale Prices - Prompt Delivery 

We Can Also Recycle Your Leaves, Brush & Branches 
Roll-Off Service Available Upon Request 

WINDSOR COMPOST COMPANY 

Alexander Road 
West Windsor, NJ 

609-799-6404 







4&OOOON 



in 



REAL ESTATE 

(600) 024-1416 



M th.mh.i» Sir.* FfMKHon NJ 0M42 



32 CHAMBERS STREET * PRINCETON, NJ 
1-800-763-1416 * 609-924-1416 



■ 



Italian Villa Inspired 




\Newly constructed custom built in Princeton Township and designed by Maximillian Hayden. Top-of-the-line materials, smart 
upgrades and stunning views both inside and out. Granite countertops in kitchen and bathrooms. Marvin windows, Morgan 
doors, and recessed lighting throughout as well as a double-sided gas fireplace for dining and living pleasure. A stunning 
kitchen with custom wood cabinets, Sub-Zero refrigerator, Gaggenau steamer, Miele dishwasher, Viking stove and much 
more. Two sun decks and a screened in porch allow for enjoyment of the private backyard. Institute for Advanced Study as 
well as Springdule Golf course frame the neighborhood. Detached 2 car garage and .46 acre. $1,945,000 



www.stockton-reaItor.com 



CCMSUMM 

I lutnu 






moves 



'.COM 



Coldwell Banker. Since 1906, America's Premier Real Estate Company 




PRINCETON — Magnificent 5-acre estate home. 
Brazilian cherry floors, library pocket doors, gourmet 
kitchen & custom wainscoting. Great Rd. to Drakes 
Corner Rd to Frederick Ct #1 6. PRT3244 

Marketed by Patrick Patel $3,450,000 




PRINCETON — Colonial on 2.5 ac. 5 BR, 4.5 BA. 1 BR 
studio over det. 3-car garage. Rt. 206 So. to R on Elm 
Rd, becomes Great Road to #408 on left. PRT3165 

Marketed by Anne Love $990,000 




PRINCETON — Colonial w/recently updated 4th floor 
addition. Littlebrook School System. Rt. 27 N, L on 
Shadybrook, L on Gulick to #24. PRT331 7 

Marketed by Anne Love $875,000 



PRINCETON — JUST REDUCED! Colonial in heart of 
Princeton. 3 BR, 2 BA. Sun room, new den/family rm 
addition. Nassau St. to turn onto Moore to 
#198. PRT3180 

Marketed by Sima Greenblat $469,900 



Experience, Trust, ReliabilityOvSjervice 



riSiEF 



ColdweU Banker Mortgage Services 

888-531-9130 

Concierge Services 800.353.9949 

Global Relocation S<rvices 877.384.0033 

Previews Internation I Estates Division 800.575.0952 



www.ColdwellBankerMoves.com 



coLOtueu. 

BANKGR □ 



Residential Brokerage 



Princeton, 

10 Nassau Street 

609.921.1411 



i% 

&3&M2 o^ThS* 



03 



C200J. CokMI Bankn Real Estate Cypoootav CuUmII Banket • • ngmmd oadeaawt d CoLfecIl Banker Ospontion. An Equal Opportunity Company Equal Houunc Opportunity Ovn*d and Operated by NRT Incorporated. 



Listed by Robin Wallack • Direct dial 924-2091 or 924-1600 ext. 1722 





THROW YOUR CARES AWAY!! Here is a simply adorable home with all the charm of an old house (which it is) and all the 
convenience of a new one (renovated beautifully with central air and skylight). From the diagonal oak floors to the built in 
antique corner cupboard, this property has it all. Superb in-town location, brick terrace and a private backyard add to its appeal. 
The living room has a fireplace, of course, and there are two bedrooms plus a loft. Call today for an appointment to see this 
very special house — you II be glad you did!! 

$305,000 




Prudential 



Visit our Gallery of Virtual Home Tours at www.prufoxroach.com 

An Independently Owned and Operated Member of The Prudential Real Estate Affiliates. Inc. 



Fox & Roach 
REALTORS* 



tt> 



Gloria Nikon 

REALTORS 



f^GMAC 
IT 




RealEstate 



TWO BEAUTIFUL TOWN HOMES IN THE SAME TERRIFIC 

NEIGHBORHOOD 




FIELDWOOD MANORS 
AT PRINCETON 



DEERFIELD MODEL 
Offered at $472,000 

Sunny Deerfield model features a I" i1.hh 
master bedroom in addition to 2 second Qooi 
bedrooms and loft. Super finished basement 

with full batfa and fenced patio make this 
home a charmer. 




Marketed bv Ellen Lefkowit/ 



SHANNON MODEL 
Offered at $545,000 

A bright, spacious surprise is what awaits 
you in this Shannon model. 3 bedrooms and 
3 1/2 baths offers plenty of living space. A 
sensational finished basement with 3 rooms 
plus a full bath enhance this lovely home. 



J — a S E I o w 



£ E E ' c e 



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33 Witherspoon Street - Princeton, New Jersey 08542 
Tel: (609) 921-2600 Fax: (609) 921-3299 

http://www.glorianilson.com http://www.eleganthomes.org http://www.gmacrealestate.com 



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£o?ne' op$€' atea & /<me6/ A&mefr 




HOPEWELL. Beautiful, fenced 38 acre Country Estate in the Harbourton area. This upscale, IN year old 
Colonial boasts 17 rooms, 6 BRs, 5 full and 2 half baths, 24x37 foot Solarium, Jacuzzi room, unbelievable 
mahogany paneled family room with cathedral ceilings and two offices. The lower level is beautifully fin- 
ished with separate exercise room with sauna, game and media rooms, a half bath and rear stairs. The prop- 
erty has a 5-stall barn, heated pool, tennis court, expanded deck, huge gazebo, 3 car garage and circular drive- 
way. Marketed by Alan Wait. $3,000,000 



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Alan Walt 




OPEN SUNDAY, 1-4 
PRINCETON. 1.9 acre partially wooded property fronting on Stony Brook. This four bedroom con- 
temporary ranch offers endless possibilities for present or fulure use. Marketed by (Catherine 
Peas* $899,000 

Directions: Great Road lo Rosedale to left on Lambert to #90. 




OPEN HOUSE, SUNDAY 1-4 
HOPEWELL. Extraordinary country home on 9 acres. Circa 1780 stone farm house. Spacious rooms, 
country kitchen w/fireplace, 3 add'l. working fireplaces, 2 staircaseJ. Cluster of restored outbuildings. 
Marketed by Demse Varga A Kilty Chenowcth. 

Directions: Rt. 31 North to left on Marshalls Comer- Woodsvillc Road (CR612) lo left onto Harbourton- 
Woodsville to #63) $887,000 




<;K EAT LOCATION 

PRINCETON. End unit in small development. Three bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, neutral, sliders to 
deck and two balconies. Marketed by Beatrice Bloom. $444,900 




OPEN HOUSE SUDAY 1-4 
PRINCETON — The Perfect Combination — country colonial on 2.18 acres ol private wooded 
^nd newly landscaped properly in Princeton Township. Convenient lo shops, schools and parkv 4 
large bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, formal living room and dining room, wood paneled library v. ah 
bookshelves. 3 fireplaces. Pool. Front and back terraces Studio apt. with bath and kitchen above 2 
car detached garage. Marketed by Patty Tappan. $850,000 

i'»" 'ions: Snowdcn Lane towards Herrontown — gray house on left #o2o 



fW///>/ 



C&piol Properties & Estates 



PRINCETON OFFICE 

350 Nassau Street, Princeton 

609-921-1900 

www.weichert.com 




Weichert 



Ask About W«ch«ffs 
On»-Stop Shopping Services 



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Cherry Valley. Grand Glenmoor. 




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3/4BR, 2 1/2 HA, 2 home offices. Bright 
and airy home borders park with sunset 
views." Over 4400 sq ft with 
finished daylight basement, 
h 1 1 p : // w w W.geocftfef .CO m/eh errv \ a I le \ 4/ 
OurHouie.html. 689,000. By 
owner, appointment only. 609-466-0850. 



EXCEPTIONAL IN-HOME: 

CHILD CARE Special needs mei 
Dependable, flexible P/T. F/T 10 
years of toving care in the neighbor- 
hood References Call for information 
packet today (609) 497-2906 
9-17-6t 

PAUL BROWNE 
LANDSCAPE MASONRY 

(609) 279-9883 

Stonewalls, Patios. A Steps 

Bluestone & Brick Pavers 

Tree A Snrub Installation 

Snow Removal 

9-17-61 

HOUSECLEANINO: ears of 
experience Excellent references 
(609)847-1966 9-24-51 

CHILD CARE: Flexible hours, com- 
petitive pay Live in or live out Excel- 
lent driving, child care experience, 
recommendations required Call (609) 
333-150010-1-41 

WE BUY USED BOOKS: All sub- 
jects, but pay better for literature. his-* 
tory. art. architecture, children's and 
philosophy Good condition a must 
Call Micawber Books 110-114 Nas- 
sau Street, Princeton 921-8454 tfc 



AFTER-SCHOOL CHILDCARE: 

Loving, mature, educated woman will 
provide after school and evening 
child care on a live-m basis Non- 
Cail (732) 476-7231 or 
tigeriilye 765 7363301 com 10-8- 3t 

ROOM FOR RENT: Furnished 

bedroom, Princeton Boro, profes- 
sional male, private home dov. 
Near Princeton University Shared 
kitchen, bath, pa/tang, cable S500/ 
month includes utilities 924-8632 
e venings iQ-8-3t 

PERSONAL FITNESS TRAINER: 

Get m shape BEFORE the holidays! 
Fall special - three personal training 
sessions for $150 (Save $75') Call 
Ron at (609) 393-8572 10-8-3t 

1996 ACURA CL 3.0 Two door. 
6 cyl all power, keyless entry, secu- 
;em. aprox 27K original miles 
Can no longer drive due to health 
problems Call (732) 297-6933 to 
come and see and make an 
offer 10-08-3t 

CLOCK REPAIRS: Van Dom- 
melen Clock Company will pick up, 
repair, and deliver to hour home Or 
you may pick up at our new location 
(as of November 1) at 41 Bridge 
Sireet Lambertville (609) 921-9240 
or Toll Free (877) 826-3662 10-8-3t 



GREAT WEEKENDER; Near the 
river Move-in condition condo m 
Lambertville Low maintenance, A/C. 
skylights, central vac. garage Walk to 
towpath $235,000 Call WEIDEL 
REALTORS - Nina Burns. (609) 397- 
0777. exl 216 10-01-4t 

JUPITER, FLORIDA: Three bed- 
rooms, 2 baths villa near ocean 
Screened in porch, private yard Pool, 
tenms. walk to everything Available 
for holidays One month minimum 
Princeton owner 683-0970 10-8-3t 

ARE YOU TIRED: of going to the 
grocery store 9 If so. we will do your 
weekly shopping for you and deliver it 
to your house in the Princeton area 
Call (609) 635-1515 or email 
cerberus32l0©yahoo com Call or 
email and we will fully explain our 
program 10-8-31 

HOUSE FOR RENT: 3 bedrooms. 
2 full bath Located on one of Prince- 
ton's "tree streets * $1800/month 
Available December 1, 2003. No 
pets, no smoking Phone 
921-7303 l0-8-3t 

FLOOR SANDINO. STAINING 

and retinishing hardwood floors 
installed BEST FLOORS, 924-4897 



HOUSECLEANINO: Please call 
for a lernfic cleaning service High 
quality and reasonable rates Experi- 
enced, good references Own trans- 
portation Call Krystyna at 
586-5087 10-8-71 

TEMPUR-PEDtC: Swedish Foam 
Mattresses, as seen on TV Autno- 
nzed Dealer Capital Bedding. 1951 
RTE 33. Hamilton Square 
1-800-244-96O5 tf 

HATE TO CLEAN? 

You deserve a break. Please call 
(609) 683-5889 for temfic cleaning 
Renata Yunque's trademarked busi- 
ness, the one and only original. 
A Clean House Is 
A Happy House ■ Inc. 

He 

TUTOR/COUNSELOR 

Reading. Writing. Math, Special Ed 

Instruction ranges 5 to Adult 

SSAT, PSAT. SAT Preparation 

Organization snd study skills 

30 years experience 

Tutor while building self-esteem 

Certified Reading, Special Ed, 

Counseling 

University of PA 

Judy (609) 520-0720 

tf-26t-2-18 



New Listing 




Real Estate Brokers i c 
Four Nassau Street, Princeton. NJ 08542 

www.ntcallaway.com 




A setting with the grace of 
historic Williamsburg intro- 
duces this elegant townhouse 
in Governors Lane, one of 
Princeton's most distin- 
guished communities. The 
foyer of this center entrance 
colonial is flanked by a gra- 
cious living room with fire- 
place and dining room with 
floor-to-ceiling bay window, 
which in turn opens to a pro- 
fessional kitchen with large 
center island and breakfast 
bar. The open ground-to- 
rooftop stairwell with a sky- 
light leads to the master bed- 
room with fireplace and 
sitting area, master bath, 
three additional bedrooms 
and two additional bath- 
rooms. Some of the fine fea- 
tures in this well-appointed 
home include built-in speak- 
ers, finished lower level fam- 
ily room, and enchanting 
courtyard garden. This is 
one-of-a-kind home in a first- 
rate neighborhood. $790,000 

Marketed by 
W ilia Stackpole 



609-921-1050 Sotheby's 



IN-E»SAT»OMAl. »tAlTT 




ESTHER A. CAPOTOSTA, GRI 

Brok*r Ownmr ■ Uctnt+O In PA 



w/wx 



GREATER PRINCETON 

Thinking of Buying or Selling? 

Let me put my 15 years 

experience to work for you. 

Se habla su idioma 

RfcyHKK Greater Princeton 

PRINCETON FORRESTAL VILLAGE 

Office: (609) 951-8600 Rm,: (609) 737-2063 

F«k (am) 737-4781 ToH Free: (077) »SJ-£STHEH 

£-m«il ESCAP0«A0LCOM 

www EitherSells com 
(S) Q Each Office Independently Owned & Operated 



Maximize Your Storage Space! 



Versatile Custom Shelving Systems 
Without The Custom Price 



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Vinyl Coaled Steel 
1 Custom Laminated 
1 Continuous Sliding 
1 Frea Icplawawal Warranty 

• Goroge Orgonlzers 

• In-Home Office Systems 

• Boffi & Kitchen Cabinet Organizers 

• Custom Mirrors & Doors 

• Tub & Snovver Enclosures 



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=■ h The Closet Doctor 



i.ctoMtdocto«.com 



1-800-6-CLOSET («>9) 268-8340 



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Chris Gage 

A really good 
builder (and designer!) 

Family owned since 1955 
Princeton • 609-921-3111 

Chrisgage.com 



^JUtternian! 

-~ fatter Ckanbg <*- Gutter Jtepairfagr 

«•" and... Gutter Replacement! 



Hjghqs.t Quality Seamless Gutters 



[ 921 -2 299 1 

Xa^rvfn.gr the Prfnceton area atnee 1936^ 



Got 15 Minutes? 

Find out how much home 
you can afford.* 

1-888-531-9130 

Call today for your 
Free Pre-approval! 

Financing provided by Coldwell Banker Mortgage, 
3000 Leadenhall Road, 
Mt. Laurel, NJ 08054 

•Subject to applicable secondary market credit and 
property approval guidelines. ^^.^ 



EQL'AL HOl'SING 
LENDER 



(mI Prudential 

Fox & Roach 
REALTORS' 






^gSSi 


Wk 




M\M 




Elegant and pristine, this 1 .5 year young custom built home is a gem, surrounded by woods and 
located in the highly sought after neighborhood of Littlebrook. An inviting two story foyer leads 
to sun-filled rooms! This home has many exquisite features including solid maple flooring on the 
main level. Enjoy entertaining on the bluestone porch off the kitchen or dining room. A luxurious 
Master Bedroom Suite has a separate sitting area with a fireplace and French doors leading to 
a covered mahogany deck. A gardener's delight with an 8 x 10 greenhouse to hold all your 
needs. The gourmet chef will be surrounded by custom cherry wood cabinets, a built in 
Gaggenau steamer, an Asko stainless steel dishwasher, a Dacor gas cooktop with oversize 
convection/oven and a Sub-Zero refrigerator. For the wine connoisseur there is an insulated 
room in the basement ready to use as a wine cellar. So much home at the newly reduced price!! 
Princeton. $1 ,535,000 

Marketed by Wendy Merkovitz 







Gracious in-town living at its finest! This 2 bedroom, 3 full bath home has been completely 
updated from top to bottom with a neutral decor. This includes new windows and new refrigera- 
tor, washer and dryer. The new granite counter tops are a perfect accent to the newer cabinets 
and tile floor. There are hardwood floors throughout and new carpeting in a finished loft, perfect 
for an office or playroom. This beautiful home has a full basement and a detached one car 
garage! Located in the borough of Princeton close to all transportation as well as town! New 
Price Reduction!! Princeton. * $349,000 

Marketed by Wendy Merkovitz 




hometou' 



Visit our galley of virtual home tours at 
www.prufoxroach . com 

166 Nassau Street 

Princeton 

609-924-1600 



EQUAL HOUSING 
OPPORTUNITY 



EXPANSIVE CONTEMPORARY RANCH 
OVERLOOKS PRINCETON BROOK 



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THE SEBASTIANI FENCING: 
ACADEMY OF PRINCETON 

Registration avaiiaole year round Call 
(609) 419-1700 or visit our site 
www fencmgmstruction com, email 
Gabneii€r®tericirg.r,strjction.com tf 

COMPUTER WORK PAINFUL? 

Relieve neck, shoulders and back 
stiffness Try Reiajiercise/Feldenkrais 
classes, which create the benelit of 
massage for a fraction of the price 
rtaf Michal Berweuven (609) 
924-2595 10-15-31 



I his thoughtfully expanded ranch back up to RCK 01 "pen space. Originally 
three bedrooms, ii is one of ihc best additions we have seen: cathedral ceil- 
ings, decks on cither side of connecting dining room, master suite with even a 
study, and a lower level two bedroom suite and large great room overlooking 
the DTOOl foi IMC as a flat or for guests or au pair. Versatile throughout [| hat 
di rinlly gefll IID1II roomi lir.i two blocks from the grammar school, yet it 
i till prod i " d fbi i'iiv.h y forevei I 01 furthei Information call Jim i in 
hot* oi i in. i f. lerncnl n Kellei Williams Realb 17-8889 $739,000 

WEST WINDSOR COLONIAL 
SURROUNDED BY OPEN SPACE 



Tina Clement 

609-987-8889, 

Ext. 246 

Evening: 
609-924-2558 




i hli original bimhi in I ia f gently sloping land surrounded 

n hip open sp.in Mi. in im.iiiik, with several pjtios for out- 

idt i Hi' ruining i hi house itself has | rous rooms including a country 

kitchen [Tit living room is expansivi rhen an Four bedrooms in all The 

outbuilding) may i" ol Interei tany buyers. Ask for Jim Firestone direct 

Bl 609 987 8889i (I !12 rB£ $383,500 



ROOSEVELT: Just listed! 3 BR. 2 

BA Colonial on 1/2 acre lot. One car 
artacned garage, central air Levinson 
Assoc Realtors. (609) 655-5535 Mar- 
keted by Mel A Adlerman (609) 655- 
7788 weekends 10-15 

DISHWASHER A FRIDGE: Avail 
able in very good condition Best 
offer Call (908) 872-1280 1Q-15 

TK PAIHTIHG: Interior. e»tenor 
power-washing, wallpaper removal, 
deck staining Excellent references. 
Free estimates. 947-3917 
121/10-8-12-24 

TUTORING: Math. English. 
French, plus tests SAT. PSAT. SSAT, 
etc Study skills, test-taking skills. 
motivational coaching Princeton Uni- 
versity graduate (University Scholar, 
AP credit m math, English. French), 
experienced tutor and NJ licensed 
teacher with counseling background 
(609) 924-5484 
H9-24/19t 

Prlnc.ton Township: $3500/ PARTY SERVERS: Bartenders 
month 3 - 4 bedrooms. 3.5 baths. a nd Grill Chels available Home and 
stone patio, fenced-in yard. 2 car corporate partes Have fun at your 
garage One block to NY bus. 2 own party. Call "With A Twist- 
blocks to Littlebrook School Available 856-461-8702 
10-01-03 through 7-31-04 t»9-10-12-31t 



CURRENT 
RENTALS 

Franklin Township: S6000/month 
Beautifully restored (armhouse, sur- 
rounded by 25 acres Furnished Five 
bedrooms, 4 5 baths, in-ground pool 
Pool house has kitchen and 2 bath- 
rooms Princeton address Available 



Jim Firestone 

609-987-8889 

Ext. 212 



„ KELLER WILLIAMS 

SsltS REALESTATE 

100 (anal Polnte Blvd., Suite 120, Princeton, NJ 08540 • 609-987-8889 



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Montgomery Township: $1900/ 
month plus utilities Furnished, 3 bed- 
room. 2 5 bath, end unit in Montgom- 
ery Woods Available now 

Princoton Township: $1100/ 
month Cottage, adjacent to private 
residence near Jasna Polana Living 
room, kitchen, 2 bedrooms, bath 
Garage space for one car Available 
December 1 

We have customers 
waiting for houses! 

STOCKTON MEANS FULL SERVICE 
REAL ESTATE We list. We sell. We 
manage II you have a house to sell 
or rent we are ready to service you 1 
Call us lor any ol your real estate 
needs and check out our website at 
httpWwww stockton-realtor com. 

See our display ad (or our available 
houses lor sale 

STOCKTON 

REAL ESTATE, LLC 

32 Chambers Street 

Princeton, NJ 08542 

609-924-1416 

Anne S. Stockton, 

Licensed Broker 



VERY DETAILED CLEANING: 

By a Polish woman with many years 
experience Own transportation and 
references available. Please call and 
ask lor Barbara (609) 851-1890 
9-24- 12t 

DAN LUCIAN NOVACOVICI 

(609) 924-2684 General' contractor 
and Electrical contractor Engineer- 
ing, new construction, additions, 
remodeling, (house, kitchen, bath- 
room, deck, etc ) and repairs Rewir- 
ing, residential, commercial Building 
Inspector 40 years experience (Euro- 
pean and U.S.) License # NJ AC 
006567 and he. #08179 tf-12/31 

BEAUTIFUL, CUSTOM-MADE 

draperies, period window treatments 
ol all types. Slipcovers and line 
upholstery Shades and blinds labnc 
and wallcovering at a discount. Serv- 
ing all your interior design needs with 
in-home or office consultation. Esti- 
mates cheerfully given Call Sherry, 
The Creative Heart (609)397-2120 tl 

AIRPORT SERVICE: Reliable, 
affordable car service to all airports, 
tram stations, NYC, etc Fully licensed 
and insured Independently operated 
(or 13 years Call Attache Limo, 
924-7029 tf 

PRINCETON RESIDENTS who 

read, read TOWN TOPICS 



OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE 

Route 130 
Cranbury, NJ 

2357 sq tl available immediately 

and 
1750 sq It. available immediately 

Princoton/Mightstown Road 
Princoton Junction, NJ 

185 sq ft. available immediately 

Nassau Street 
Princoton, NJ 

1074 sq ft avail immediately. 

adjacent to Princeton University. 

Space can also be divided into 

212 sq ft .430 sq It or 854 sq ft 

Franklin Comer Road 
Lawroncovillo, NJ 

1585 sq ft avail immediately 

and 
1350 sq ft avail immediately 

State Road (Route 206) 
Princoton, NJ 

150 sq. ft available immediately 
183 sq.ft. available 12/1/03 

CALL for appointment (609) 921-0808 

Thompson Land 

195 Nassau Street 

Princoton, NJ 08542 

10-15 



LAMP SHADES: Lamp mounting 
and lamp repairs. Nassau Interiors, 
162 Nassau Street tfc 

FOAM CUT TO ANY SIZE: 

Cushions, mattresses, boats, camp- 
ers. Capital Bedding. 1-800-244-9605 

for quote tf 

PRINCETON LAWN SERVICE 

We mow lawns, etc 

(609)921-8440 

or 
(732) 297-2911 

2-19-52t 

Z SCAPES 

Artistic Landscaping 

Total Lawn and Landscape Service 

(609) 443-5470 

tf-2-26-52t 

GOT DIRTY FLOORS? All kinds 
of vinyl, stone, tile. Iloors cleaned and 
restored like new 1 Wood Iloors? No 
sanding' References galore! Satisfac- 
tion guaranteed Free estimates Call 
Allstate now (609) 924-1574 
Allslatecleanmg com tf/ 12/31 




MONTGOMERY TWP — Boautilully landscaped premier 
properly located in desirable neighborhood. This over- 
sized 5 BR, 2.5 bath home boasts a large entry foyer, 
gourmet kitchen, brick hearth fireplace & hardwood 
iloors 

I Hi 0357 Loretta McManus 908-904-6829 
Hillsborough Office 908-874-8421 $614,900 




PLAINSBORO — Modified Hastings colonial carriage 
house featuring 3 spacious BRs, each w/full bth, 9' ceil- 
ings on 1 ' II., open fir plan w/architectural columns, Pal- 
ladian windows, and much, much more! Plainsboro 
Rd-L Walker Gordon Dr-R Elise-L Paddock. 
PRJ0617 Joyce Belfiore 750-41 19 
Pnnceton Junction Office 609-799-8181 $485,000 






PRINCETON — "Woodrow Wilson" model-3BR/2.5 bath- 

MBR w/gas fpl/Jacuzzi. Entry foyer w/cir strcse to loft, 

beautifully landscaped. 

PRJ0600 Helene Fazio 750-4121, Toby Steinhauser 

750-4139 

Princeton Junction Office 609-799-8181 $610,000 




PRINCETON — Princeton Borough Great Value! Darling 

3 bedroom, 1.5 bath split home in pristine condition 

Unusual opportunity to own a home in walking distance 

to all shops & stores. 

PRJ0470 Roxanne Gennan 586-7252 

Princeton Junction Office 609-799-81 81 $499,900 



CRANBURY — New England-designed 5BR. 3BA home 

in wooded Wynnewood. 2-car garage, full bsmt. Near 

school, lake & histonc village. 

PRJ0343 Margaret Brennan 750-4107 

Pnnceton Junction Office 609-799-8181 $564,900 



WEST WINDSOR — Colonial home w/in-ground heated 
pool, custom built entertainment ctr, dbl gas fireplace in 
MB, 1+ acre property. Old Trenton Rd-L on Cottonwood. 
PRJ0479 Sujani Murthy 750-4127 
Pnnceton Junction Office 609-799-8181 $948,000 



Experience, Trust, Reliability^ervice 



www.CoIdwellBankerMoves.com 



Coldwell Banker Mortgage Services 
888-531-9130 

Concierge Services 800.353.9949 

Global Relocation Services 877.384.0033 

Previews International Estates Division 800.575.0952 



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Princeton Hightstown Road 

Princeton Junction, NJ 08550 

609.799.8181 



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FARMETTE MINUTES FROM HOPEWELL 
HILLSBOROUGH — Nestled on 3 acres (you'll think 
there are 100) with views of greenery from every win- 
dow. A charming colonial, totally and tastefully renovat- 
ed, 4 bedrooms/2.5 baths, open beam ceilings, pumpkin 
pine floors. A porch and provincial style patio surround 
the house adorned with plants and flowers — perfect for 
relaxing and entertaining. A grand old barn awaits the 
horses. Farmette connects to miles of riding 
trails. $840,000 

CALL WEIDEL PRINCETON (609) 921-2700 




COUNTRY RETREAT 
MONTGOMERY — 4 miles from Princeton, you will find 
this custom colonial on a gentleman's farm, situated on 
7.43 acres of mature landscape and surrounded by land 
preservation. 1" floor livina space has a flowing floor 
plan with a country home feel. Upstairs are generously 
sized bedrooms and an oversized master suite. Farm 
assessment possible. $699,900 

CALL WEIDEL PRINCETON (609) 921-2700 




TWO-UNIT HOME 
PRINCETON — This updated home has newer kitchens 
and baths and is situated on a lovely lot with a detached 
garage. It is centrally located to shopping, library and 
schools. This home is currently used as a two-unit home 
and is easily converted into a one-unit home. Don't miss 
a great opportunity to own this terrific home. Call today 
for your private showing! $419,000 

CALL WEIDEL PRINCETON (609) 921-2700 




NATURE LOVER'S RETREAT 
MONTGOMERY — Custom craftsmanship and quality 
abound in this contemporary classic located on almost 
two wooded acres with a pond and bordered by the 
Cherry Brook. Every nook and cranny delights the sens- 
es, from the top-of-the-line kitchen to the great room 
with built-in shelving, track lighting, custom banquettes 
and more. Call today. $779,000 

CALL WEIDEL PRINCETON (609) 921-2700 



WEIDEL REALTORS AT THE COURTYARD ♦ 190 NASSAU STREET, PRINCETON, NJ 



REALTORS 



(609) 921-2700 

E-mail: princcton@weidcl.com 
REAL ESTATE ♦ MORTGAGE ♦ INSURANCE ♦ TITLE 




MEMBER OF 

WHO'S WHO 

IN LUXURY 

REAL ESTATE 




I III III XDERSONS 



THIS VERY DAY SOME OF 

THE AREA'S FINEST 

PROPERTIES 

ARE AVAILABLE THROUGH 

THIS OFFICE.... 




34 CHAMBERS STREET 



MELODY WOODS III... more than a dwelling, a tribute! 

...to the spirit of the late world-class craftsman GEORGE 
NAKASHIMA. this unbelievable marriage of wood, glass and 
si one, stands side by side with culture. Warmth glows with 
i .Hid ih< spini i a nd beauty of Nakashima pervades the 
i nil. residence. Remarkable architectural features of 
vaulted ceilings and hexagonal skylights Alter light from 

above and beyond. Serenity, tranquility, softness, 

gentleness. ..are all provided by this exceptional dwelling 
throughout all necessary rooms... music/living, diing, 
librai v l.ii' hen. Arlyn/family, master suite and guest 
qii truly a haven from" t lie world and its cares. Please 

call foi details. Princeton Township. 




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ARCHITECTS NEW HOUSE MADE EVEN BETTER... INSIDE & 
OUT! One of the signature houses at POND VIEW, and the last 
I opportunity to buy from the builder! Open spaces, exceedingly 
gracious floor plan, three levels with a master on the main floor, 
spacious deck across the entire house with access from the liv- 
ing, dining and family rooms... all overlooking the woods. A full 
finished lower level for recreation, teenagers, guests, or home 
office! $1,750,000 



STATELY OLD ELM RIDGE PARK... Come see this spectac- 
ular seemingly traditional colonial on a large lot in old Elm 
Ridge Park with a Princeton mailing address! The new 
kitchen is simply stunning with a fireplace, granite eat-in 
island, top Ol the line appliances and charming custom tile 

original floor plan has been expanded to 
ln< luai i room master suite and a quiet first floor 

study. With tall trees, a fenced yard, a pool, finished base- 
men! and much more. Call today! $849,000 





HERITAGE RESTORATION MANAGEMENT HAS JUST COM- 
PLETED ANOTHER OF ITS OUTSTANDING HOMES... on 

Colfax Road in Montgomery, nestled between two golf courses, 
this is the ultimate executive retreat! Originally, an architect- 
designed neo-Classic, now a Shingle-style manor on an acre of 
perfect grounds with a pool complex and separate carriage 
house over the three-car garage, this spacious home is NEW 
from the basement up! Master suite on the first floor, three 
other bedrooms each with its own NEW bath, designer kitchen 
with up to the -minute countertops and appliances, custom 
panelling In the grand dining room, and a sunken living room 
overlooking the seven open acres behind. READY TO MOVE 
RIGHT IN! $1,625,000 



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<PRJNCETON 

REAL ESTATE 

GRQUR, 



STOP BY OUR NEW OFFICES fiPOT TP SEE THESE AND M0RE 0N 0UR 

AND SAY "HELLO"! Uiyyurw EXCITING NEW WEBSITE 

John T. Henderson w ™ p™*™™ 1 *^™^™ 

LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER 
34 Chambers Street, Princeton, NJ Phone: 609-924-1000 Fax: 609-924-7743 




A Western Princeton Estate... 
A Vision Realized!! 




34 CHAMBERS STREET 



THE HENDERSONS 




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STOP BY OUR NEW OFFICES 
AND SAY "HELLO"! 



Up a meandering driveway set back from a rural western Princeton 
road a stately brick colonial stands proud designed with elements 
both formal and casual, while maintaining an awareness and sen- 
sitivity to the surrounding natural environment. The owners built 
the home only six years ago on the only site deemed worthy of the 
vision and the result now exists as a five bedroom four and one 
half bath house combining the best of old and new. 

A gracious foyer with maple flooring and walnut inlay, invites 
guests through the front door allowing access to both the formal 
living and dining rooms and to the family room ahead with walk- 
out access to the rear yard beyond. Of course the family room is 
open to the stunning kitchen with all of the appointments 
expected for such a spectacular home. A billiards room, a study, a 
home office, a walk- in pantry, and access to the attached oversized 
three car garage completes the thorough first floor plan. 

Upstairs, an understated, yet elegant master suite has a well 
appointed full bath, large closets and a sitting room with a fire- 
place and beautiful views of the woods. Two other bedrooms share 
a large hall bath while a separate bedroom has a bath en-suite. An 
upstairs homework room exists that could be a fifth bedroom, but 
it is designed with today's family in mind. 

The third floor is a large finished recreational space accommodat- 
ing a multitude of desires, while the basement is full and ready for 
any use as well. 

The creation is more than the house. The wooded acreage has 
been preserved and protected by the owners, truly a private park- 
land. Make an appointment today to see what was once a vision 
and is now a reality. 



$2,795,000 



<PIQNCETON 

REAL ESTATE 

GKQUR. 
John T. Henderson www princetonrea ,estategroupcom 




SEE THESE AND MORE ON OUR 
EXCITING NEW WEBSITE 



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LICENSED REAL ESTATE BROKER 
hambers Street, Princeton, NJ Phone: 609-924-1000 Fax: 609-924-7743 



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20 NASSAU - HEART OF PRINCETON 

STORE FRONT 

1,380 sq. ft., exclusive area, large display windows. 

OFFICE SPACE 

1 ,035 sq. ft., 1 ,277 sq. ft., 726 sq. ft., 200 sq. ft., 1 00 sq. ft. 

Parking Garage in Immediate Vicinity 

STORAGE 

4,700 sq. ft., will divide. Dry, carpeted, electrified, 
direct access to loading platform. 

Call 609-924-7027 



GE Appliance Rebate 

Free Locksmith Service 

Long Distance Connection 

Moving Services 

10% Discount at Home Depot 

ADT Security System, Free Install 

Cable TV Installed 

Address Change 

These and many more services done for your 
customer by Weichert Financial Services! 
WHY WORK ANYWHERE ELSE? 

Call Josh Wilton, Manager, Weichert Princeton 
Office (609) 921-1900 to schedule an interview. 
Real Estate School Scholarships available. 




www weichert com 



PRINCETON OFFICE 

350 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 



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Weichert 



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I-BOOWEICHERT 



RENTALS 

House for ronl: Four bedrooms. 
1 5 baths. Princeton Riverside Avail- 
able immediately $2400/month 

Apartment for rent: Princeton 
Borough. Nassau Street. One bed- 
room. Irving room, kitchen, bath, park- 
ing $975/montn plus utilities Year 
lease required Please ask lor Kathy. 

Peyton Associates Realtors 

343 Nassau Street 

Princeton, NJ 08540 

(609) 921-1550 

10-15-tf 

HOME IMPROVEMENTS: From 
roofs to cabinets Carpentry and 
masonry repairs, large or small Call 
J at 924-1475. here since 1958 tfc 

WANTED: GUNS, SWORDS: 

And military items Licensed dealer 
will pay more. Call Bert. (732) 821- 
4949 5£ 

SCANNELLA LANDSCAPING 

Commercial/Residential Maintenance 
25 years experience Lawn cutting, 
gardening, pruning, walls, walks, and 
patios Local references available 
Larry G Scannella 924-2668 
Email LGSLandOaol com tf-521-3/5 

DOROTHY BISSELL: Watercolor 
painting for sale Southwest Series, 
$1000 Painting could be brought to 
your home lor showing Call (609) 
924-6072' 10-1-4t 

HOUSE AND APT. CLEANING: 

I speak English, have experience and 
good references Own transportation 
Call Lesvia (609) 394-7279, 213-8028 
or 273-5275 10-1-4t 



REMOVAL: YOU CALL WE 
haul! Princeton resident will 
remove unwanted items from 
attic, basement or garage. 
Interior and exterior demoli- 
tion service/cleanup. Tree 
removal at discounted rates. 
Match or beat anyone's price. 
Same day service/Sr. discount. 
Call John: (609) 720-9016 or 
cell (609) 203-5305 tt/52/4-16 



AVAILABLE RENTALS: 



PRINCETON: 

3 bedrooms, 2 baths Single family. 

$2200/month 

2 bedrooms, 2 baths Single family, 

$1900/month 

MONTGOMERY: 

4 bedrooms. 2.5 baths. Single family. 

$2950/month 

3 bedrooms. 25 baths Townhome. 

$2100/month 

HILLSBOROUGH: 

5 bedrooms, 5.5 baths Single family 
Rent includes one horse stall and 
access to trails $4000/month 

Call today for our other area 
rentals. 

WEIDEL REALTORS 

PRINCETON OFFICE 

AT THE COURTYARD 

190 NASSAU STREET 

PRINCETON, NJ 08542 

(609)921-2700 



The FELOENKRAIS METHOD 

with Jaclyn Boone (609) 279-9883 

Learn to Relax and Move with 

Greater Ease and Comfort 

Enhance Professional Performance 

Private, Semi-Pnvate. or Group 
Lessons 9-10-6t 

HOUSEKEEPING: Cleaning, iron- 
ing, laundry by Polish women with a 
lot of experience Excellent referenc- 
es, own transportation. Please call 
Inga (609) 530-1169 & leave a 
message 9-17-5t 

JEWISH CONGREGATION 

In Princeton We are the the String of 
Pearls, affiliates of the Jewish Recorv 
structionist Federation. We are a 
cooperative, family friendly, and inclu- 
sive synagogue Our Hebrew School 
is for students in first grade through 
B'nai Mitzvah. For information on 
membership contact Jane Milrod 
Jemas (609) 683 8787. or e-mail 
Jane®Jemasprinceton com 9-24-4t 

GUITAR LESSONS: Available for 
all levels of students. Individualized 
courses set by professional musician. 
Call Princeton studio at (609) 
924-8255 8-20-71 

MATH TUTORING: Available in 
algebra, geometry, trigonometry, cal- 
culus, and physics. For more mforma- 
tion call Tom at (609) 
203-8658 9-10-4t 

WINDOWS/STORM WINDOWS: 

Inside and out $7 each window Fully 
insured all work guaranteed. Call 
(609) 393-2122 or (609) 924-1404 

8-27-6t 



HOUSE CLEANING: Experience. 
10-15 excellent references English speak- 
ing Housesitting also available Call 

Susan ( 732) 873-3 1 68 9- 1 0-4t 



Law Office of Michael C. Schonberger, LLC. 

is proud to announce the opening of its 

real estate practice 

learn more about our firm on www.RE-Lawyer.com 

We are here to serve 

88 Orchard Road. Skillman, NJ 08558 Voice 609-279-9900 Fax 609-279-9901 



com 



REALTORS 



Visits us at wwwhurgdorff.com to sec all our homes for sale. 




LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP — Spectacular 4/5 bedroom, 4 1/2 bath home in prestigious neighborhood. Minutes from Princeton 
w/a Princeton mailing adr. Handsome plantation style colonial; superior craftsmanship; appealing floor plan enhanced by exten- 
sive details & designer input throughout. Hardwood & marble flooring; 2 fpl's; back staircase; gourmet kit; extra high ceilings; 
custom moldings & built-ins; finished bsmt w/separate workout rm, playroom, recreation area, wine cellar & generous storage 
areas. Court style deck in back. $1,278,000 



PRINCETON OFFICE • 264 Nassau Street • Princeton, NJ 08542 • (609) 921-9222 
For all your mortgage needs Call ERA Mortgage at 888-400-7970 




burqcIorCLm- 

1 realtors'" ER V 



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PEYTON 



ASSOCIATTES^REAL^TORS 



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HANDSOME TRADITIONAL in an appealing set- 
ting overlooking Carnegie Lake... .6 bedrooms, 
inground pool, over an acre in 
Princeton... $985,000 




A BREATHTAKING SETTING enhances this 
striking contemporary with 3 bedrooms, 4 baths, 
spectacular pool in a great Montgomery 
neighborhood... $875,000 



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PRINCETON'S EDGERSTOUNE AREA a spa- 
cious traditional with gracious features, 6 bed- 
ooms, 4 baths, on a lovely piece of 
property, .tt-^^ $835,000 




GRACIOUS TRADITIONAL in 

Princeton... convenient first floor bedroom, 2 addi- 
tional bedrooms, 2 full baths, deck overlooking 
lovely grounds.... $595,000 




ON THE WESTERN SIDE OF PRINCETON a AN ATTRACTIVE ONE STORY in Princeton 
two-story colonial with 5 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, a Township with 3 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, splendid 
family-friendly house.... $625,000 gardens, beautiful plantings.... $650,000 



343 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 609-921-1550 
■ 134 South Main Street, Pennington, NJ 08534 609-737-1550 

♦ Anna Andrevski ♦ Virginia Aahenfelter ♦ Margaret Baldwin ♦ Maynett Breithaupt ♦ Victoria Campbell ♦ Mary Finnell ♦ Martha Giancola ♦ Sheila Graham ♦ 

♦ Lynn Grieainger ♦ Laura Huntsman ♦ Marjorie Jaeger ♦ Lincoln Kemey ♦ Mildred Light ♦ Berit Marshall ♦ Margaret Michael ♦ Drucilla Mihan ♦ 

♦ Catherine Nemeth ♦ Margaret Petera ♦ Theresa Price ♦ Angela Romano ♦ Elizabeth Sayen ♦ Emily Schwab ♦ Helen Sherman ♦ Christine Short ♦ Virginia Snook ♦ 

♦ Carol Stewart ♦ Loralee Strauss ♦ Eleanor Suydam ♦ Joy Ward ♦ Martha Jane Weber ♦ Beverly Willever ♦ Nancy Willever ♦ 



(2) 



Peyton People - We Make the difference. 

Theodore "Tod" Peyton, Broker Find us at: www.peytonsales.com 



Exclusive AffHtau 

CHRISTIES 

GREAT ESTATES 




Ellen's clients are satisfied: 
"Ellen's professionalism A thor- 
oughness makes hei a pleasure to 

work with, I don 't think there could 
be a better agent!" 

Office: (609) 987-8889 

mnr If.(W) 655-0647 
Cell: (609) 577 -9012 

m ,,il « Hi... if'. / aol.com 



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Kllen I . Allel 



KELLER WILLIAMS. 



Sleep Sofas 

From 

$599 

Assorted Styles & Fabrics' 

Nassau Interiors 

162 Nassau St. • Princeton. NJ 
(609) 924-2561 

Mon-Fn 9-5 30; Thurs til 8 
Sat 9-5; Sun 12-4 




32 CHAMBERS STREET 

PRINCETON, NJ 

800-763-1416 * 609-924-1416 



Historic Princeton Home 






Elegant 4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath brick and frame, authentic 
colonial on 4.156 acres in Princeton Township. Formal liv- 
ing room with fireplace, large master suite with ample clos- 
ets. Stunning, glassed conservatory overlooking natural 
beauty. Spacious office over detached two car garage. A 
one-of-a-kind house. 



36 MOORE 

APARTMENTS FOR LEASE 




36 MOORE features 2 spacious, first floor end units with 
|m\ ate patios, as well as 14 attractive two level units. Each home has all 
modern appliances including central air-conditioning, stacked washers 
and dryers, dishwashers, cable hookups, and even built in speakers 
The kitchens are absolutely lovely, with sleek styled wood cabinets and 
stainless steel appliances. Other notable features include; generous closet 
space, brick accent walls, a circular staircase to the carpeted 
bedroom, unique bamboo-wood flooring materials, and skylights in a 
majority of the units. The exquisite landscaping and dedicated parking 
space for each unit make 36 MOORE an excellent choice for the dis- 
criminating resident. 



Weinberg Management Corporation 
217 Nassau Street, Princeton, nj 08542 



uiduion.il information and to 
arrange an appointment please contact 
Jan R Weinberg or Jaime G Weinbeij 
(609)924-8535 




Employment Opportunities 
in the Princeton Area 



OPERATIONS MANAGER: FT/PT 
for a no-kill small dog rescue facility 
Oversight of animal care and adop- 
tions, dealing with statl. clients, and 
follow up contacts Good organiza- 
tional and people skills and a knack 
for dealing with animals helpful Sal- 
ary commensurate with experience 
and ab.hty Call (908) 
904-9154 10-8-3t 

CMILOCARE WANTED: CCC A 

childcare referral service for parents 
has great jobs tor weekend babysit- 
ters, full-time and part-time nannies 
Great pay, flexible hours Call (609) 
252-9900 9-24-4t 

POSITION AVAILABLE: West 
Windsor mom seeks responsible 
Nanny to watch 2 boys, ages 5 and 2. 
two to three afternoons/evenings per 
week must have own car and excel- 
lenl references Call (609) 

936-8719 10-01-3t 

FABRIC CUTTER A SEWERS: 
Wanted with experience on machinery 
and pattern yields or industrial sewing 
machinery Call (609) 
392-4895 10-1-3t 

SITTER AND HOUSEKEEPER: 

Princeton family needs sitter for new- 
born and housekeeping full-time 7 
am - 5 pm Tuesday through Satur- 
day. English speaking Must have 
experience and references Call (609) 
279-0512 10-8 

SEAMSTRESS PART TIME: 

For high end womens's boutique 
Work on beautiful clothing Great staff, 
great customers Call Marian at 
921-0338 10-15-27 

FT/PT KENNEL STAFF: For no- 

Ikill small dog rescue facility Feeding 
the dogs, tending kennel, errands to 
vets and groomer. meeting with 
would-be adopters Ability to work 
with animals essential Working with 
people and office skills a helpful plus 
Salary negotiable Call (908) 

1 904-9154 10-8-3t 

PERSONAL ASSISTANT: FT/PT 
I to help manage a small estate 
Numerous responsibilities including 
I but not limited to correspondence, 
record keeping, filing, errands, deal- 
ing with vendors and start Salary 
negotiable (908)359-3863 10-8-31 

ADMINISTRATIVE: Fast paced 
law firm Competitive pay Flexible 
hours. Computer savy. ability to be 
flexible and handle many proiects at 
once. High energy, organized and 
efficient Excellent writing and com- 
mumcation skills Email 
recruitsOmillermitchell.com No phone 
calls please; 10-15-4t 



SALES PART-TIME: Must like 
clothesand love people Great dis- 
count, staff and customers High end 
women's boutique Call Marian 
921-0338 '0-15-21 

ASSEMBLE CRAFTS: Wood items 
up lo $480 plus/week. Free informa- 
tion package 24 hours Call 
1-800-428-4881 10-15 



Engagement & 

Wedding 
Notices/Photos 

TOWN TOPICS welcomes 
wedding and engagement 
notices and photographs. 
They should be brought or 
sent to the office at 4 Mer- 
cer Street, Princeton, NJ, 
by the Friday before the 
Wednesday publication 
date in which the 
announcement will appear 
Announcements may be 
sent in advance of the pre- 
ferred issue and release 
dates will be observed. 



DRIVERS/OWNER OPERATORS: 

Want miles 9 Central Transport is 
seeking owner operators for regional 
road runs out ol our Allentown termi- 
nal Home every other day. $ 87/mi 
all miles. 2400-3200 miles per week, 
fuel, plate, and insurance programs, 
COL A with hazmat required. 
800-922-7294 10-15 

BABYSITTER WANTED: Seeking 
experienced babysitter for adorable 
baby girl. 20-25 hrs/week. including 
one day starting at 6 am Must love 
babies and dogs, be responsible and 
creative, and have own transportation 
Non-smokers only (609) 
430-0874 10-15 



Boys Head Varsity 
Basketball Coach - 

Immediate Opening All quali- 
fied applicants should contact 
Princeton Day School Athletics 
Dept at 609-924-6700 x288. 
www.pds.org EOE 



TUTOR WANTED: Computer Sci- 
ence GRE tutor needed for TCNJ stu- 
dent for 2004 computer science GRE. 
Call (908) 735 6296 10-8-31 



PRINCETON 

DAY SCHOOL 

Seeks Assistant Girls 
Varsity Basketball Coach 

Position begins November 
17, 2003 and ends February 
25, 2004. All interested can- 
didates should contact the 
Athletic Dept. 

609-924-6700 x 267 
EOE 



CARRIER ROUTES 

AVAILABLE 

(immediate openings) 

$ 200- $600 /month 
2-5 hours / one day per week 

Are you an early bird with some free time 

every Wednesday morning at 5-6 am to 

deliver our weekly newspaper to Princeton 

residents? 

If interested please contact Ken Smith, Gen. Mgr. 

TOWN TOPICS 

an equal opportunity employer 

4 Mercer Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 tel: 609-924-2200 



REAL ESTATE AD 
MANAGER 

Part-time position immediately 

available in our downtown 

Princeton office to manage our 

real estate advertising dept. 

Fri-Mon-Tues 1 0-4 

Must be organized and 
obsessive about detail. 

Familiarity with Princeton a+. 

It interested please contact Ken Smith. General Manager 

TOWN TOPICS 

an equal opponurnry employer 

4 Mercer Street, Princeton. NJ 08540 tel: 609-924-2200 
e-mail: ken.smith@towntopics.com 



RATE INFO: 

30 words or less s ,0.00 
each aclcl'l word 10 cents 

BEST DEAL 

3 issues lor $ 27 .00 

ICING ON THE CAKE 

all bold race type 

adci'l $ 6.00 w eel 

ads with line spacing 
1 3(H) per inch 

contract rates available 

2 pm Xv 
"publication w 



Town Topics 

"un-classified ads" 



the best BANG for the buck 



14,000 weekly circulation. 20.000+weekly readers 

Phone 924-2200 or Fax 924-8818 
to place an order 

pa>ment in advance req'd; MC VISA accepted 





This distinguished property, a handsomely 
appointed main house surrounded by 
exquisite formal gardens and an 
accommodating full-scale house for guests, is 
the essence of a country estate. Its main house 
echoes the embracing hospitable ease of an 
English country manor and is enriched with 
architectural innovations and given texture 
and elegant detail by skilled craftsmen: the 
deep coffered ceiling, walk-in fireplace, 
flanked by bookcases, and angled bays oi' the 
living and dining room; a stepped wood 
ceiling in the maple-accented gourmet 
kitchen; the padded leather walls o\' the 
billiard room; a game room offering a 
southwestern ambiance; lattice work 
accenting doors and staircases assuring the 
flow of light. 



Sotheby's 

INTERNATIONAL REALTY 



Cedar walls and ceiling and a sauna 
complement the changing rooms that lead to a 
wing with magnificent pool, fireplace seating 
area, glass ceiling and angled bays opening to 
the garden. The expansive master suite, also 
opening to the garden, offers a kitchenette 
and skylit his and her baths and dressing 
areas. There are three pleasant family 
bedrooms, each with bath. A windowed 
gallery leads to the guesthouse, with its first 
floor living and dining rooms, featuring 
fireplaces. The kitchen presently serves as an 
office. On the second floor, the master 
bedroom and bath, two bedrooms and a hall 
bath and the third floor has a bedroom and a 
kitchenette. In the gracious anonymity of a 
tree-lined street in Princeton, this exceptional 
offering is near the Institute for Advanced 
Study. 

Marketed by 
Robin L. McCarthy 



N.tCallawa/ 1 

Real Estate Broker.LLC >J 



4 Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08542 (609) 921-1050 



tu 



0»»O«Tu«»T» 



www.ntcallawav.com 



cc 

e 



i 



t 

s 



Gloria Nikon 

REALTORS 



f # GMAC 

I I -ife-Real Estate 



CLASSIC AND MODERN MEET ON LIBRARY PLACE 




A Btately, traditional center hall colonial home on Princeton's Library Place has been renovated with extraordi- 
nary architectural flair. Set at the back of an expansive front lawn, framed by massive trees, the home conceals a 
rear garden combining terraces, stonewalls and mature plantings that run the length of the house. On the first floor 
is ;. Iront t<> back gracious entrance foyer, large living room with fireplace, French doors leading to a screened 
porch and a formal dining room with chair rail and crown moldings. Of special note is the kitchen/family room, 
designed lor gourmet taste, comfortable living and architectural interest. Its features include a fireplace, coffered 
ceiling, granite counters, and charming window seats. Off to one side is a large sunny breakfast room with 
cathedral ceiling, skylights, and a view of the garden. The library, equally architecturally fascinating, has built-in 
bookshelves and cabinets, double height ceiling, built-in large screen TV, and another beautiful view of the 
garden. On the second floor, the master bedroom suite has a pyramidal ceiling, sitting room, walk-in closet with 
custom cabinetry and a luxurious marble master bathroom. Two additional bedrooms and bathrooms with a 

anient laundry room nearby complete this floor. The third floor has a spacious bedroom with triple floor 

length windows overlooking the garden, a hallway with abundant closets, and one of the most unusually designed 
bathrooms you will ever s* 





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inf. mm * m 
link mi "^ vmniiini 




FOR FURTHER DETAILS CONTACT JUDY STIER 



H 



P R I N 



E T Q U 



.Q F F I C P 



33 Witherspoon Street - Princeton, New Jersey 08542 
Tel: (609) 921-2600 Fax: (609) 921-3299 

http://www.glorianilson.com http://www.eleflanthomas.org http://www.gmacrealesUte.com 



£} 




Introducing Assisted Living and Skilled Nursing 
at Stonebridge at Montgomery 



Princeton area's most innovative new senioi living 
community, Stonebridge at Montgomery, offers 
independent living apartments and < ottages and 
is now accepting reservations for assisted living 
and skilled nursing. 

An on-site continuum oi < are — assisted living, 
skilled nursing, memorj care, and physu ian and 
rehabilitative services. 

A separate, secure neighborhood foi those with 
memory impairment. 



• Affiliated with Presbyterian Monies Sc Servii es, 
a not for-profit, non-se< tarian organization with 
ovei 85 years ol expei ience in providing servii i 
to seniors. 

• Phis, all assisted living residents enjoy complete access 

to all Stonebridge amenities, sneh as the fitness unlet, 

indoor swimming pool, library, banking, post office 

and more. 




AT MONTC.OMFKY S' 

Independent Living • Assisted Living • Skilled Nursing 

(888) 327-2444 

Information Center: 512 Executive Drive, Princeton, NJ 08540 • www.phsmt.onj 

|nsi south "I ili<- Pi mi ciiiii An |k»i i 

flood I f tmlefnrm the intersection of Montgomery Road and i 




Jiaidenla at Stond/ridgeat Montgomery 

in,, maintain tilth 'ml, /„ mini. • . rn/.-M' 

favorite activities liki visits with grandchildren 



Commonly Asked 

Questions about 

Assisted Living and 

Skilled Nursing at 

Stonebridge at 

Montgomery 



J^*f Sionrhrid m uiMiatrd T_ L^^J 

d m^w »iiii l'i- C^A. IOUAl MI,U$INC 

™ ^^ i ii.'i 1..1 |h..im i-h" | lion v^ v orroHTumn 



Wbal is an assisted living 
imumty? 

Assisted living < ommunities offei 
seniors i ompassionate assistant i 
v. hi. of dail) living in .1 

home like setting, ini luding services 
bin li as three meals pei day, hous< - 
1 , , ping and mu< h more. Residents 
and iIh 11 families gain peai e oi 
mind from knowing thai profession- 
al . .in givers an thi re to help meel 
. hanging health 1 an ni 1 ds I h< 
01 iabilitj "I < ommunit) life and a 
full ( alendai <>i stimulating a< uvitj 
1 iprjons 1 "iin ibute to a fulfilling 
hi, Some assisted living < ommuni- 

■ ii( 1 separate, se< ure living 
areas with spe< ialized programming 
foi reside nts with Uzh< im< 
disease or other types oi memorj 
impaii 1 

What happens if residents need 
more can- than their assisted living 

community can provide? 

I \ l >i< ally, when residents have med- 
H al needs thai require .1 nursing 
home level <»l care, the) will have 
1.. move from theii assisted living 

reside .1 skilled nursing 

Inline. 1 he benefit oi Stonebridge 
..1 \\, mtgomery is thai an adji lining 
skilled nursing neighbor! d is 

I, m ated "ii siti & >, assisted living 
residents who need skilled medical 
can 1 mi ■:< 1 the .issisi.uk <• the) 
need on a ti mporai j 1 n perman( nl 
basis right where the) already Hvt 
1 1 .1 residents who need short-term 
n h.ii.iln.iih.n rehab services are 

II adit} available in the skilled 
nursing se« lion. 

what is the benefit ol assisted 
living as part ol the Stonebridge 
community ? 

Residents ol assisted living 01 skilled 
nursing 1 enters will have ai 1 ess to 
the lull ,ui.i\ oi amenities available 
.11 Stonebi idgi al Mi intgi imery, 
mi luding .1 fitness « enter, indooi 



\i S 

with Mom an ■ 



pool, a comprehensive library, 
a . 1 imputi 1 ' ' nter, .1 state-of-the-art 
pi 1 1, irming arts < enter, and much 
more. 

What are the benefits of a 
Presbyterian Homes 8c Services 
assisted living community? 
Presbyterian Homes & Services, Inc. 
(PHS) is .1 not-for-profit, non-sei tar- 
ian organization that pro\ides a 
wide range of living options and 
segues to seniors throughout New 
Jersey. The PHs not-for-profit status 
means that incoming revenue is 
( ..mii ibutt .1 .In- 1 d\ to resident 1 an 
and si rvi< es. With over 85 years 
ol experience, Presbyterian Homes 
gives residents and families assur- 
.1111 •• ol financial and operational 
stability. 

How can I obtain more information 
about Stonebridge at Montgomery? 
( ..II 888-327-2 1 1 1 We'll he happy 
1. 1 provide you with additional 

ml. .1 ination about i elu eiiient and 
health care options, including 
assisted living, continuing 1 .m 
retirement communities, skilled 
nursing 01 atloidahle housing 




Vev / 1 <>/j '/ fWeyc 
AT MONTGOMERY <S 

(888) 327-2444 

luioi 111. in. .11 < enter: 

512 I \ecutive l)i i\. 

Princeton, \| 08540